Discussion:
Proof That I Am Not Very Poetic
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Brettster
2016-09-09 22:02:13 UTC
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1. "Love is a Many-Splendored Thing" should be "Love is a Very Splendid Thing."

2. "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" should be "The First Time I Ever Saw Your Face."

Me gots none poetic consonance.
bill van
2016-09-09 22:50:21 UTC
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Post by Brettster
1. "Love is a Many-Splendored Thing" should be "Love is a Very Splendid Thing."
No. They mean different things. "Very splendid" is an overall assessment
of the quality of a person or thing. "Many-splendored" says the person
or thing in question has many outstanding qualities. But you're right,
your version did take the charm out of the writing.
Post by Brettster
2. "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" should be "The First Time I Ever Saw Your Face."
No, it shouldn't. It's perfectly grammatical either way. The original's
phrasing is intended to scan properly when it's song. It's kind of
klunky the other way.
Post by Brettster
Me gots none poetic consonance.
I think it's worse than that. You have destructive tendencies when it
comes to language. What did those two phrases ever do to you?
--
bill
Peter Boulding
2016-09-10 11:22:45 UTC
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Post by Brettster
2. "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" should be "The First Time I Ever Saw
Post by Brettster
Your Face."
No, it shouldn't. It's perfectly grammatical either way.
And mans the same, which is by no means always the case with the English
language; only two of the following mean the same thing:

1. Only my sister picks her nose.
2. My only sister picks her nose.
3. My sister only picks her nose.
4. My sister picks only her nose.
5. My sister picks her only nose.
6. My sister picks her nose only .

1. Nobody else does.
2. I have but one sister.
3. She never does anything else.
4. She doesn't pick scabs, or spots, or fights, or whatever.
5. She has but one nose.
6. As per 4, above.
--
Regards, Peter Boulding
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Fractal Images and Music: http://www.pboulding.co.uk/
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Sanford M. Manley
2016-09-10 19:08:46 UTC
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Post by Peter Boulding
And mans the same, which is by no means always the case with the English
1. Only my sister picks her nose.
2. My only sister picks her nose.
3. My sister only picks her nose.
4. My sister picks only her nose.
5. My sister picks her only nose.
6. My sister picks her nose only .
1. Nobody else does.
2. I have but one sister.
3. She never does anything else.
4. She doesn't pick scabs, or spots, or fights, or whatever.
5. She has but one nose.
6. As per 4, above.
Well tell her to stop ! :)
--
Sanford
Alfalfa Bill
2016-09-10 19:40:12 UTC
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Post by Peter Boulding
Post by Brettster
2. "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" should be "The First Time I Ever Saw
Post by Brettster
Your Face."
No, it shouldn't. It's perfectly grammatical either way.
And mans the same, which is by no means always the case with the English
1. Only my sister picks her nose.
2. My only sister picks her nose.
3. My sister only picks her nose.
4. My sister picks only her nose.
5. My sister picks her only nose.
6. My sister picks her nose only .
1. Nobody else does.
2. I have but one sister.
3. She never does anything else.
4. She doesn't pick scabs, or spots, or fights, or whatever.
5. She has but one nose.
6. As per 4, above.
She's rough.
She's tough.
She picks her nose and eats the stuff.

She's rough.
she's tough.
She picks her nose and eats the stuff.
Jeff Wisnia
2016-09-14 21:50:28 UTC
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Post by Peter Boulding
Post by Brettster
2. "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" should be "The First Time I Ever Saw
Post by Brettster
Your Face."
No, it shouldn't. It's perfectly grammatical either way.
And mans the same, which is by no means always the case with the English
1. Only my sister picks her nose.
2. My only sister picks her nose.
3. My sister only picks her nose.
4. My sister picks only her nose.
5. My sister picks her only nose.
6. My sister picks her nose only .
1. Nobody else does.
2. I have but one sister.
3. She never does anything else.
4. She doesn't pick scabs, or spots, or fights, or whatever.
5. She has but one nose.
6. As per 4, above.
One of my favorite truisms is:

"You can pick your nose but you can't pick your family."

(At least not the one you were born into.)

Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
The speed of light is 1.8*10^12 furlongs per fortnight.
Harvey
2016-09-14 22:49:49 UTC
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On Wed, 14 Sep 2016 17:50:28 -0400, Jeff Wisnia
Post by Jeff Wisnia
"You can pick your nose but you can't pick your family."
(At least not the one you were born into.)
" You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but don't
try to pick your friend's nose. "

( Made me laugh when I heard it c. 1963. Granted, I was 11 years
old.)
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanE (30 years) & BrE (34 years), indiscriminately mixed
Questor
2017-08-02 18:27:51 UTC
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On Sat, 10 Sep 2016 12:22:45 +0100, Peter Boulding
Post by Peter Boulding
Post by Brettster
2. "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" should be "The First Time I Ever Saw
Post by Brettster
Your Face."
No, it shouldn't. It's perfectly grammatical either way.
And mans the same, which is by no means always the case with the English
1. Only my sister picks her nose.
2. My only sister picks her nose.
3. My sister only picks her nose.
4. My sister picks only her nose.
5. My sister picks her only nose.
6. My sister picks her nose only .
1. Nobody else does.
2. I have but one sister.
3. She never does anything else.
4. She doesn't pick scabs, or spots, or fights, or whatever.
5. She has but one nose.
6. As per 4, above.
Changing the meaning by changing the case:

She requested an apple. She requested an Apple.
(fruit or computer?)

Are the bushes gone from the white house?
Are the bushes gone from the White House?
Are the Bushes gone from the White House?

Brettster
2016-09-10 22:44:33 UTC
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Post by bill van
I think it's worse than that. You have destructive tendencies when it
comes to language. What did those two phrases ever do to you?
Oh, Bill, it is SO much worse than you think. It goes way, way beyond
language.

For example: It occurred to me recently that there are many different
kinds, brands and sizes of eggs at the supermarket. One of the chief
differences seems to be the "grade" of eggs. I find all of it absolutely
mystifying. I require two things out of my eggs. One: Please do not be
broken. Two: All of the chambers need to be occupied by an egg. That
is all. If there is a carton of a dozen that costs $1.99, and another that
costs $5.99, obviously I am going to choose the cheaper one, largely
because one egg is pretty much the same as another as far as I have
the power to perceive. I have never had any problem with any egg I
have ever purchased. The real problem is with me, as I am fairy inept
at cracking eggs—a little piece of shell always seems fall into the
white, and I have to fish it out with the closest available utensil.

I could provide many other examples, but I don't want to scare
people.
Tim Wright
2016-09-10 22:50:09 UTC
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Post by Brettster
Post by bill van
I think it's worse than that. You have destructive tendencies when it
comes to language. What did those two phrases ever do to you?
Oh, Bill, it is SO much worse than you think. It goes way, way beyond
language.
For example: It occurred to me recently that there are many different
kinds, brands and sizes of eggs at the supermarket. One of the chief
differences seems to be the "grade" of eggs. I find all of it absolutely
mystifying. I require two things out of my eggs. One: Please do not be
broken. Two: All of the chambers need to be occupied by an egg. That
is all. If there is a carton of a dozen that costs $1.99, and another that
costs $5.99, obviously I am going to choose the cheaper one, largely
because one egg is pretty much the same as another as far as I have
the power to perceive. I have never had any problem with any egg I
have ever purchased. The real problem is with me, as I am fairy inept
at cracking eggs—a little piece of shell always seems fall into the
white, and I have to fish it out with the closest available utensil.
I could provide many other examples, but I don't want to scare
people.
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on the
rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to crack the
egg on a flat surface. You'll find it far less likely to wind up with
shell in the white.
--
“What did you expect? Welcome, sonny? Make yourself at home? Marry my
daughter? You've got to remember that these are just simple farmers.
These are people of the land. The common clay of the new West. You
know... morons.”
Gene Wilder, "Blazing Saddles"


Tim W
Brettster
2016-09-10 22:52:23 UTC
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Post by Tim Wright
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on the
rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to crack the
egg on a flat surface. You'll find it far less likely to wind up with
shell in the white.
Thank you, Tim. That may be the single best piece of advice I have ever come away
from this forum with.
b***@gmail.com
2016-09-11 00:55:26 UTC
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Plus, next time you get a bit of shell in the cracked egg, do not reach for the nearest utensil...use the shell you probably still have in your hand. The bit you are fishing for will cling quite readily to the edge of the larger piece of shell, instead of sliding away.
bobg
2016-09-12 17:20:56 UTC
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On Saturday, September 10, 2016 at 6:50:15 PM UTC-4, Tim Wright wrote:

<snip>
Post by Tim Wright
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on the
rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to crack the
egg on a flat surface. You'll find it far less likely to wind up with
shell in the white.
I've gotten that advice a lot, from people whose opinion I trust - and it
does seem to reduce the number of times that I get shards of eggshell in
the bowl where they shouldn't be. But a non-zero number of times, I maybe
apply a couple inch-ounces more force than I should, and the egg shatters on
the countertop, handling which is even more annoying than picking the shells
out of the bowl. So I'm back to using the rim of the bowl, at least until I
learn to better control my awesome strength.
Greg Goss
2016-09-13 03:40:34 UTC
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Post by bobg
<snip>
Post by Tim Wright
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on the
rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to crack the
egg on a flat surface. You'll find it far less likely to wind up with
shell in the white.
I've gotten that advice a lot, from people whose opinion I trust - and it
does seem to reduce the number of times that I get shards of eggshell in
the bowl where they shouldn't be. But a non-zero number of times, I maybe
apply a couple inch-ounces more force than I should, and the egg shatters on
the countertop, handling which is even more annoying than picking the shells
out of the bowl. So I'm back to using the rim of the bowl, at least until I
learn to better control my awesome strength.
I've never had problems breaking eggs into a bowl off the side of the
bowl.

But peeling hard boiled eggs? Impossible. Shock-cold under running
water, whatever.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
6***@gmail.com
2016-09-13 10:39:08 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by bobg
<snip>
Post by Tim Wright
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on the
rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to crack the
egg on a flat surface. You'll find it far less likely to wind up with
shell in the white.
I've gotten that advice a lot, from people whose opinion I trust - and it
does seem to reduce the number of times that I get shards of eggshell in
the bowl where they shouldn't be. But a non-zero number of times, I maybe
apply a couple inch-ounces more force than I should, and the egg shatters on
the countertop, handling which is even more annoying than picking the shells
out of the bowl. So I'm back to using the rim of the bowl, at least until I
learn to better control my awesome strength.
I've never had problems breaking eggs into a bowl off the side of the
bowl.
But peeling hard boiled eggs? Impossible.
Peeling hard boiled eggs is easy. What's impossible is peeling hard boiled eggs WITHOUT some of the egg white(s) breaking/coming/tearing off with the shell.
Tim Wright
2016-09-13 12:26:27 UTC
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Post by 6***@gmail.com
Post by Greg Goss
Post by bobg
<snip>
Post by Tim Wright
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on the
rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to crack the
egg on a flat surface. You'll find it far less likely to wind up with
shell in the white.
I've gotten that advice a lot, from people whose opinion I trust - and it
does seem to reduce the number of times that I get shards of eggshell in
the bowl where they shouldn't be. But a non-zero number of times, I maybe
apply a couple inch-ounces more force than I should, and the egg shatters on
the countertop, handling which is even more annoying than picking the shells
out of the bowl. So I'm back to using the rim of the bowl, at least until I
learn to better control my awesome strength.
I've never had problems breaking eggs into a bowl off the side of the
bowl.
But peeling hard boiled eggs? Impossible.
Peeling hard boiled eggs is easy. What's impossible is peeling hard boiled eggs WITHOUT some of the egg white(s) breaking/coming/tearing off with the shell.
I found this article a little over a year ago. My wife and I have been
using this method for hard boiled eggs ever since. It seems to be the
best path to success.

<http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/05/the-secrets-to-peeling-hard-boiled-eggs.html>

http://tinyurl.com/mljapo9
--
The only difference between death and taxes is that death doesn't get
worse every time Congress meets.
Will Rogers



Tim W
Brettster
2016-09-13 07:18:29 UTC
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Post by Tim Wright
It is best to crack the
egg on a flat surface. You'll find it far less likely to wind up with
shell in the white.
Tried it this morning, with egg-cellent results. Again, many thanks.

Brett
Opus the Penguin
2016-09-14 14:47:45 UTC
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Post by Tim Wright
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on the
rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to crack the
egg on a flat surface.
Last time I did that the entire egg ended up on the stovetop rather than in
the pan.
--
Opus the Penguin
The best darn penguin in all of Usenet
Les Albert
2016-09-14 16:02:58 UTC
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On Wed, 14 Sep 2016 14:47:45 -0000 (UTC), Opus the Penguin
Post by Opus the Penguin
Post by Tim Wright
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on the
rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to crack the
egg on a flat surface.
Last time I did that the entire egg ended up on the stovetop rather than in
the pan.
According to the egg cracking mavens, you should break the egg on the
broadly curved inner surface of the bowl that you are using to receive
the egg, not the flat surface of the counter. I don't do that;
instead I use the edge of a butter knife to crack eggs directly into
the frying pan, and never have a problem with pieces of the shell
coming off. You have to use the right amount of force so that you get
a clean break in the shell without breaking the yolk.

Les
Opus the Penguin
2016-09-14 21:40:38 UTC
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Post by Les Albert
According to the egg cracking mavens, you should break the egg on the
broadly curved inner surface of the bowl that you are using to receive
the egg, not the flat surface of the counter. I don't do that;
instead I use the edge of a butter knife to crack eggs directly into
the frying pan, and never have a problem with pieces of the shell
coming off. You have to use the right amount of force so that you get
a clean break in the shell without breaking the yolk.
I think you're right. I don't seem to have the knack, at least not anymore.
Either eggs aren't as good as they used to be, or I'm not. Maybe both.
--
Opus the Penguin
The best darn penguin in all of Usenet
Les Albert
2016-09-14 22:02:59 UTC
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On Wed, 14 Sep 2016 21:40:38 -0000 (UTC), Opus the Penguin
Post by Opus the Penguin
Post by Les Albert
According to the egg cracking mavens, you should break the egg on the
broadly curved inner surface of the bowl that you are using to receive
the egg, not the flat surface of the counter. I don't do that;
instead I use the edge of a butter knife to crack eggs directly into
the frying pan, and never have a problem with pieces of the shell
coming off. You have to use the right amount of force so that you get
a clean break in the shell without breaking the yolk.
I think you're right. I don't seem to have the knack, at least not anymore.
Either eggs aren't as good as they used to be, or I'm not. Maybe both.
Don't be too hard on yourself about the egg failures. According to
this person the problem may be entirely with the chicken:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Thin shelled eggs just mean that the hen that was laying it didn't
get quite enough of the nutrients she needed to develop a thicker
shell. It could be as simple as she didn't enough calcium, etc. just
that week alone before laying. It's no big deal. It means absolutely
zero for the consumer. The eggs are completely safe to eat. (My
background: I am a local food producer, have raised chickens my entire
life, and I am a biologist with specific knowledge in ornithology and
animal husbandry/agriculture).". - http://tinyurl.com/zjas9wn
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Les
Charles Bishop
2016-09-15 03:34:32 UTC
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Post by Les Albert
On Wed, 14 Sep 2016 14:47:45 -0000 (UTC), Opus the Penguin
Post by Opus the Penguin
Post by Tim Wright
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on the
rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to crack the
egg on a flat surface.
Last time I did that the entire egg ended up on the stovetop rather than in
the pan.
According to the egg cracking mavens, you should break the egg on the
broadly curved inner surface of the bowl that you are using to receive
the egg, not the flat surface of the counter. I don't do that;
instead I use the edge of a butter knife to crack eggs directly into
the frying pan, and never have a problem with pieces of the shell
coming off. You have to use the right amount of force so that you get
a clean break in the shell without breaking the yolk.
you don't want to telegraph the yolk either.

charles, yuk, yuk
Tim Wright
2016-09-14 17:10:33 UTC
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Post by Opus the Penguin
Post by Tim Wright
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on the
rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to crack the
egg on a flat surface.
Last time I did that the entire egg ended up on the stovetop rather than in
the pan.
Silly bird, you're supposed to keep the egg balanced on your feet and
nurture it.
--
The only difference between death and taxes is that death doesn't get
worse every time Congress meets.
Will Rogers



Tim W
Opus the Penguin
2016-09-14 21:40:36 UTC
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Post by Tim Wright
Post by Opus the Penguin
Post by Tim Wright
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on
the rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to
crack the egg on a flat surface.
Last time I did that the entire egg ended up on the stovetop rather
than in the pan.
Silly bird, you're supposed to keep the egg balanced on your feet and
nurture it.
Well, of course I do that. But after a while I get hungry, you know?
--
Opus the Penguin
The best darn penguin in all of Usenet
Lesmond
2016-09-16 01:36:13 UTC
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Post by Opus the Penguin
Post by Tim Wright
Post by Opus the Penguin
Post by Tim Wright
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on
the rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to
crack the egg on a flat surface.
Last time I did that the entire egg ended up on the stovetop rather
than in the pan.
Silly bird, you're supposed to keep the egg balanced on your feet and
nurture it.
Well, of course I do that. But after a while I get hungry, you know?
...
--
She may contain the urge to run away
But hold her down with soggy clothes and breeze blocks
Charles Bishop
2016-09-16 20:13:17 UTC
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Post by Opus the Penguin
Post by Tim Wright
Post by Opus the Penguin
Post by Tim Wright
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on
the rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to
crack the egg on a flat surface.
Last time I did that the entire egg ended up on the stovetop rather
than in the pan.
Silly bird, you're supposed to keep the egg balanced on your feet and
nurture it.
Well, of course I do that. But after a while I get hungry, you know?
You call that nurturing?
--
charsles
Jeff Wisnia
2016-09-14 22:15:52 UTC
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Post by Tim Wright
Post by Brettster
Post by bill van
I think it's worse than that. You have destructive tendencies when it
comes to language. What did those two phrases ever do to you?
Oh, Bill, it is SO much worse than you think. It goes way, way beyond
language.
For example: It occurred to me recently that there are many different
kinds, brands and sizes of eggs at the supermarket. One of the chief
differences seems to be the "grade" of eggs. I find all of it absolutely
mystifying. I require two things out of my eggs. One: Please do not be
broken. Two: All of the chambers need to be occupied by an egg. That
is all. If there is a carton of a dozen that costs $1.99, and another that
costs $5.99, obviously I am going to choose the cheaper one, largely
because one egg is pretty much the same as another as far as I have
the power to perceive. I have never had any problem with any egg I
have ever purchased. The real problem is with me, as I am fairy inept
at cracking eggs—a little piece of shell always seems fall into the
white, and I have to fish it out with the closest available utensil.
I could provide many other examples, but I don't want to scare
people.
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on the
rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to crack the
egg on a flat surface. You'll find it far less likely to wind up with
shell in the white.
Technology to the rescue!

http://tinyurl.com/zwtsh3c

and...

http://tinyurl.com/jycnk6q

Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
The speed of light is 1.8*10^12 furlongs per fortnight.
Tim Wright
2016-09-14 23:01:04 UTC
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Post by Jeff Wisnia
Post by Tim Wright
Post by Brettster
Post by bill van
I think it's worse than that. You have destructive tendencies when it
comes to language. What did those two phrases ever do to you?
Oh, Bill, it is SO much worse than you think. It goes way, way beyond
language.
For example: It occurred to me recently that there are many different
kinds, brands and sizes of eggs at the supermarket. One of the chief
differences seems to be the "grade" of eggs. I find all of it absolutely
mystifying. I require two things out of my eggs. One: Please do not be
broken. Two: All of the chambers need to be occupied by an egg. That
is all. If there is a carton of a dozen that costs $1.99, and another that
costs $5.99, obviously I am going to choose the cheaper one, largely
because one egg is pretty much the same as another as far as I have
the power to perceive. I have never had any problem with any egg I
have ever purchased. The real problem is with me, as I am fairy inept
at cracking eggs—a little piece of shell always seems fall into the
white, and I have to fish it out with the closest available utensil.
I could provide many other examples, but I don't want to scare
people.
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on the
rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to crack the
egg on a flat surface. You'll find it far less likely to wind up with
shell in the white.
Technology to the rescue!
http://tinyurl.com/zwtsh3c
and...
http://tinyurl.com/jycnk6q
Jeff
Solutions looking for a problem.
--
The only difference between death and taxes is that death doesn't get
worse every time Congress meets.
Will Rogers



Tim W
Kerr Mudd-John
2016-09-15 08:46:20 UTC
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On Wed, 14 Sep 2016 23:15:52 +0100, Jeff Wisnia =
Post by Jeff Wisnia
I think it's worse than that. You have destructive tendencies when =
it
Post by Jeff Wisnia
comes to language. What did those two phrases ever do to you?
Oh, Bill, it is SO much worse than you think. It goes way, way beyon=
d
Post by Jeff Wisnia
language.
For example: It occurred to me recently that there are many differen=
t
Post by Jeff Wisnia
kinds, brands and sizes of eggs at the supermarket. One of the chief=
differences seems to be the "grade" of eggs. I find all of it =
absolutely
mystifying. I require two things out of my eggs. One: Please do not =
be
Post by Jeff Wisnia
broken. Two: All of the chambers need to be occupied by an egg. That=
is all. If there is a carton of a dozen that costs $1.99, and anothe=
r
Post by Jeff Wisnia
that
costs $5.99, obviously I am going to choose the cheaper one, largely=
because one egg is pretty much the same as another as far as I have
the power to perceive. I have never had any problem with any egg I
have ever purchased. The real problem is with me, as I am fairy inep=
t
Post by Jeff Wisnia
at cracking eggs=E2=80=94a little piece of shell always seems fall i=
nto the
Post by Jeff Wisnia
white, and I have to fish it out with the closest available utensil.=
I could provide many other examples, but I don't want to scare
people.
The most frequent cause of shell in the egg is cracking the egg on th=
e
Post by Jeff Wisnia
rim of a bowl or pan or something like that. It is best to crack the=
egg on a flat surface. You'll find it far less likely to wind up wit=
h
Post by Jeff Wisnia
shell in the white.
Technology to the rescue!
ITYM Gadget (wo)Man!
Post by Jeff Wisnia
http://tinyurl.com/zwtsh3c
and...
http://tinyurl.com/jycnk6q
Jeff
-- =

Bah, and indeed, Humbug
Charles Bishop
2016-09-11 01:38:43 UTC
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In article <06745a3f-a405-499b-93b5-***@googlegroups.com>,
Brettster <***@gmail.com> wrote:

[there was snippage]
Post by Brettster
The real problem is with me, as I am fairy inept
at cracking eggs—a little piece of shell always seems fall into the
white, and I have to fish it out with the closest available utensil.
use a large piece of the broken eggshell.

--

harles
Greg Goss
2016-09-12 04:05:17 UTC
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Post by Brettster
Post by bill van
I think it's worse than that. You have destructive tendencies when it
comes to language. What did those two phrases ever do to you?
Oh, Bill, it is SO much worse than you think. It goes way, way beyond
language.
For example: It occurred to me recently that there are many different
kinds, brands and sizes of eggs at the supermarket. One of the chief
differences seems to be the "grade" of eggs. I find all of it absolutely
mystifying. I require two things out of my eggs. One: Please do not be
broken. Two: All of the chambers need to be occupied by an egg. That
is all. If there is a carton of a dozen that costs $1.99, and another that
costs $5.99, obviously I am going to choose the cheaper one, largely
because one egg is pretty much the same as another as far as I have
the power to perceive. I have never had any problem with any egg I
have ever purchased. The real problem is with me, as I am fairy inept
at cracking eggs—a little piece of shell always seems fall into the
white, and I have to fish it out with the closest available utensil.
Oh, there are lots of complexities to eggs. Some people claim that
free-range eggs, where the chickens get to eat bugs and such have more
micronutrients. I'm not sure if that has ever been tested. But a
client of my late wife perfected a way of getting Omega 3 fatty acids
(a nutrient important in brain function and regulation of other
systems like blood pressure) into eggs by changing the chicken's diet.
Then there's size. And size counts.

But I'm not sure which size counts. The stores where I regularly shop
have both "extra large" and "jumbo". Is Jumbo bigger than extra
large? They're not clear on that.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Tim Wright
2016-09-12 04:24:16 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Brettster
Post by bill van
I think it's worse than that. You have destructive tendencies when it
comes to language. What did those two phrases ever do to you?
Oh, Bill, it is SO much worse than you think. It goes way, way beyond
language.
For example: It occurred to me recently that there are many different
kinds, brands and sizes of eggs at the supermarket. One of the chief
differences seems to be the "grade" of eggs. I find all of it absolutely
mystifying. I require two things out of my eggs. One: Please do not be
broken. Two: All of the chambers need to be occupied by an egg. That
is all. If there is a carton of a dozen that costs $1.99, and another that
costs $5.99, obviously I am going to choose the cheaper one, largely
because one egg is pretty much the same as another as far as I have
the power to perceive. I have never had any problem with any egg I
have ever purchased. The real problem is with me, as I am fairy inept
at cracking eggs—a little piece of shell always seems fall into the
white, and I have to fish it out with the closest available utensil.
Oh, there are lots of complexities to eggs. Some people claim that
free-range eggs, where the chickens get to eat bugs and such have more
micronutrients. I'm not sure if that has ever been tested. But a
client of my late wife perfected a way of getting Omega 3 fatty acids
(a nutrient important in brain function and regulation of other
systems like blood pressure) into eggs by changing the chicken's diet.
Then there's size. And size counts.
But I'm not sure which size counts. The stores where I regularly shop
have both "extra large" and "jumbo". Is Jumbo bigger than extra
large? They're not clear on that.
Here is probably more than you really want to know on the subject.

https://sizes.com/food/chicken_eggs.htm
--
The only difference between death and taxes is that death doesn't get
worse every time Congress meets.
Will Rogers



Tim W
Sanford M. Manley
2016-09-13 01:36:28 UTC
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Post by Tim Wright
Here is probably more than you really want to know on the subject.
https://sizes.com/food/chicken_eggs.htm
That was eggciting!
--
Sanford
Tim Wright
2016-09-13 02:16:42 UTC
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Post by Sanford M. Manley
Post by Tim Wright
Here is probably more than you really want to know on the subject.
https://sizes.com/food/chicken_eggs.htm
That was eggciting!
I found it a shell of a good read.
--
The only difference between death and taxes is that death doesn't get
worse every time Congress meets.
Will Rogers



Tim W
bill van
2016-09-12 05:31:18 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Brettster
Post by bill van
I think it's worse than that. You have destructive tendencies when it
comes to language. What did those two phrases ever do to you?
Oh, Bill, it is SO much worse than you think. It goes way, way beyond
language.
For example: It occurred to me recently that there are many different
kinds, brands and sizes of eggs at the supermarket. One of the chief
differences seems to be the "grade" of eggs. I find all of it absolutely
mystifying. I require two things out of my eggs. One: Please do not be
broken. Two: All of the chambers need to be occupied by an egg. That
is all. If there is a carton of a dozen that costs $1.99, and another that
costs $5.99, obviously I am going to choose the cheaper one, largely
because one egg is pretty much the same as another as far as I have
the power to perceive. I have never had any problem with any egg I
have ever purchased. The real problem is with me, as I am fairy inept
at cracking eggs—a little piece of shell always seems fall into the
white, and I have to fish it out with the closest available utensil.
Oh, there are lots of complexities to eggs. Some people claim that
free-range eggs, where the chickens get to eat bugs and such have more
micronutrients. I'm not sure if that has ever been tested. But a
client of my late wife perfected a way of getting Omega 3 fatty acids
(a nutrient important in brain function and regulation of other
systems like blood pressure) into eggs by changing the chicken's diet.
Then there's size. And size counts.
But I'm not sure which size counts. The stores where I regularly shop
have both "extra large" and "jumbo". Is Jumbo bigger than extra
large? They're not clear on that.
Jumbo eggs are consistently larger than extra large at the several
places where I have bought them. I buy only extra large or jumbo, brown,
free range eggs. I realize there is no consistent definition of free
range, but it is a good bet that they're not in cages without enough
space to turn around.

We're not big egg eaters, maybe a dozen a month, but we like them to
taste good when we have them. The free range eggs taste considerably
better, and the jumbo ones often turn out to be double-yokers, which
suits me. Jumbos tend to have double the volume per egg that so-called
large eggs do. Regular sized eggs now look like pigeon eggs to me.

We occasionally have fried egg sandwiches on good buns with layers of
dill pickles and jalapeno slices, and a slice of smoked salmon when we
have some around. I also scramble them for breakfast, with
worcestershire sauce, sambal, and chopped shallots and other compatible
veggies.

And I don't mind paying $5 or $6 a dozen, even though I can get a dozen
regular or large eggs for three bucks or less. I economize on a lot of
my shopping, but not when the more expensive stuff is so much better
than the regular.
--
bill
Howard
2016-09-12 14:56:52 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Greg Goss
Oh, there are lots of complexities to eggs. Some people claim that
free-range eggs, where the chickens get to eat bugs and such have
more micronutrients. I'm not sure if that has ever been tested. But
a client of my late wife perfected a way of getting Omega 3 fatty
acids (a nutrient important in brain function and regulation of other
systems like blood pressure) into eggs by changing the chicken's
diet. Then there's size. And size counts.
But I'm not sure which size counts. The stores where I regularly
shop have both "extra large" and "jumbo". Is Jumbo bigger than extra
large? They're not clear on that.
Jumbo eggs are consistently larger than extra large at the several
places where I have bought them. I buy only extra large or jumbo,
brown, free range eggs. I realize there is no consistent definition of
free range, but it is a good bet that they're not in cages without
enough space to turn around.
We're not big egg eaters, maybe a dozen a month, but we like them to
taste good when we have them. The free range eggs taste considerably
better, and the jumbo ones often turn out to be double-yokers, which
suits me. Jumbos tend to have double the volume per egg that so-called
large eggs do. Regular sized eggs now look like pigeon eggs to me.
We occasionally have fried egg sandwiches on good buns with layers of
dill pickles and jalapeno slices, and a slice of smoked salmon when we
have some around. I also scramble them for breakfast, with
worcestershire sauce, sambal, and chopped shallots and other
compatible veggies.
And I don't mind paying $5 or $6 a dozen, even though I can get a
dozen regular or large eggs for three bucks or less. I economize on a
lot of my shopping, but not when the more expensive stuff is so much
better than the regular.
At my farmer's market, there's a couple who sell regular and cage free
eggs. People ask the difference and he tells them that for the cage
free eggs he leaves the door open to the hen house so the hens can go
outside, but they almost never do. I have a feeling he's not the
typical example of a chicken farmer, though.

I'm sure there are examples out there of organic farmers who brutalize
their chickens and major wholesalers who treat their chickens kindly,
although I agree that overall the moms of organic eggs get a somewhat
better treatment than the moms of regular eggs. And all of the moms end
up in soup sooner or later.
Opus the Penguin
2016-09-14 21:15:15 UTC
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Post by Howard
At my farmer's market, there's a couple who sell regular and cage free
eggs. People ask the difference and he tells them that for the cage
free eggs he leaves the door open to the hen house so the hens can go
outside, but they almost never do.
I bet that darn red wheelbarrow is in the way!
--
Opus the Penguin
The best darn penguin in all of Usenet
Howard
2016-09-14 23:14:57 UTC
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Post by Opus the Penguin
Post by Howard
At my farmer's market, there's a couple who sell regular and cage free
eggs. People ask the difference and he tells them that for the cage
free eggs he leaves the door open to the hen house so the hens can go
outside, but they almost never do.
I bet that darn red wheelbarrow is in the way!
It depends.

So much depends, come to think of it.
John Mc.
2016-09-12 12:14:01 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Brettster
Post by bill van
I think it's worse than that. You have destructive tendencies when it
comes to language. What did those two phrases ever do to you?
Oh, Bill, it is SO much worse than you think. It goes way, way beyond
language.
For example: It occurred to me recently that there are many different
kinds, brands and sizes of eggs at the supermarket. One of the chief
differences seems to be the "grade" of eggs. I find all of it absolutely
mystifying. I require two things out of my eggs. One: Please do not be
broken. Two: All of the chambers need to be occupied by an egg. That
is all. If there is a carton of a dozen that costs $1.99, and another that
costs $5.99, obviously I am going to choose the cheaper one, largely
because one egg is pretty much the same as another as far as I have
the power to perceive. I have never had any problem with any egg I
have ever purchased. The real problem is with me, as I am fairy inept
at cracking eggs—a little piece of shell always seems fall into the
white, and I have to fish it out with the closest available utensil.
Oh, there are lots of complexities to eggs. Some people claim that
free-range eggs, where the chickens get to eat bugs and such have more
micronutrients. I'm not sure if that has ever been tested. But a
client of my late wife perfected a way of getting Omega 3 fatty acids
(a nutrient important in brain function and regulation of other
systems like blood pressure) into eggs by changing the chicken's diet.
Then there's size. And size counts.
But I'm not sure which size counts. The stores where I regularly shop
have both "extra large" and "jumbo". Is Jumbo bigger than extra
large? They're not clear on that.
I thought it was girth that mattered?

John Mc.
Les Albert
2016-09-12 16:08:24 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Oh, there are lots of complexities to eggs. Some people claim that
free-range eggs, where the chickens get to eat bugs and such have more
micronutrients. I'm not sure if that has ever been tested. ....
It's difficult to perform exact micronutrient testing; the true
free-range chickens are sometimes not available for testing:


Les
Greg Goss
2016-09-13 03:39:12 UTC
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Post by Les Albert
Post by Greg Goss
Oh, there are lots of complexities to eggs. Some people claim that
free-range eggs, where the chickens get to eat bugs and such have more
micronutrients. I'm not sure if that has ever been tested. ....
It's difficult to perform exact micronutrient testing; the true
http://youtu.be/heMbsdTJaAw
"Home, home on the range ..."

I like the GEICO ads, and haven't ever seen that one.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
bobg
2016-09-12 17:31:51 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Brettster
Post by bill van
I think it's worse than that. You have destructive tendencies when it
comes to language. What did those two phrases ever do to you?
Oh, Bill, it is SO much worse than you think. It goes way, way beyond
language.
For example: It occurred to me recently that there are many different
kinds, brands and sizes of eggs at the supermarket. One of the chief
differences seems to be the "grade" of eggs. I find all of it absolutely
mystifying. I require two things out of my eggs. One: Please do not be
broken. Two: All of the chambers need to be occupied by an egg. That
is all. If there is a carton of a dozen that costs $1.99, and another that
costs $5.99, obviously I am going to choose the cheaper one, largely
because one egg is pretty much the same as another as far as I have
the power to perceive. I have never had any problem with any egg I
have ever purchased. The real problem is with me, as I am fairy inept
at cracking eggs—a little piece of shell always seems fall into the
white, and I have to fish it out with the closest available utensil.
Oh, there are lots of complexities to eggs. Some people claim that
free-range eggs, where the chickens get to eat bugs and such have more
micronutrients. I'm not sure if that has ever been tested. But a
client of my late wife perfected a way of getting Omega 3 fatty acids
(a nutrient important in brain function and regulation of other
systems like blood pressure) into eggs by changing the chicken's diet.
Then there's size. And size counts.
But I'm not sure which size counts. The stores where I regularly shop
have both "extra large" and "jumbo". Is Jumbo bigger than extra
large? They're not clear on that.
--
Jumbo is bigger than extra large.

Mayflower Poultry in Cambridge, MA (who have my favorite business slogan: "LIVE POULTRY FRESH KILLED" (http://tinyurl.com/zzsx7em)) sell "extra jumbo"
eggs, which are the biggest chicken eggs I have regular access to. (A
dozen, on average, will feature three or four with double yolks, which is
probably good luck in some peasant tradition or other.)
a***@yahoo.com
2016-09-10 11:53:51 UTC
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You can't get no satisfaction.
Alfalfa Bill
2016-09-10 18:04:59 UTC
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Post by a***@yahoo.com
You can't get no satisfaction.
In the desert you can remember your name
'Cause there ain't no one for to give you no pain
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