Discussion:
Did we ever resolve this - Remotes at a Distance?
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Charles Bishop
2017-07-31 03:58:52 UTC
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Car Talk is in repeats, of course, and "today" (30 July, 2017) they had
the question about extending the range of a car remote, by pointing it,
not in the direction of the vehicle, but back at the chin of the person
holding it. They then extended this to a tv remote's operation.

Did we (FCVO) ever figure out if this was possible? I suppose, given a
large enough car parking lot I could find out what the range was, with
and without a chin, but I'll ask here first.
--
charles
Tim Wright
2017-07-31 13:04:02 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
Car Talk is in repeats, of course, and "today" (30 July, 2017) they had
the question about extending the range of a car remote, by pointing it,
not in the direction of the vehicle, but back at the chin of the person
holding it. They then extended this to a tv remote's operation.
Did we (FCVO) ever figure out if this was possible? I suppose, given a
large enough car parking lot I could find out what the range was, with
and without a chin, but I'll ask here first.
I don't know about car remotes, but I doubt it would work with a TV
remote since most of them are IR and thus line of sight.

I have a GDO on the roll up door on my shop building. When I try to
open it from my driveway, just in front of my garage door, it won't
open. However, if I tuck the remote under my chin, like described
above, it will open from there. So that part does work.
--
Studies have shown that the people of Dubai don't understand the humor
of the Flintstones, but the people of Abu Dhabi do.

Tim W
Whiskers
2017-07-31 17:35:11 UTC
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Post by Tim Wright
Post by Charles Bishop
Car Talk is in repeats, of course, and "today" (30 July, 2017) they
had the question about extending the range of a car remote, by
pointing it, not in the direction of the vehicle, but back at the
chin of the person holding it. They then extended this to a tv
remote's operation.
Did we (FCVO) ever figure out if this was possible? I suppose, given
a large enough car parking lot I could find out what the range was,
with and without a chin, but I'll ask here first.
I don't know about car remotes, but I doubt it would work with a TV
remote since most of them are IR and thus line of sight.
I have a GDO on the roll up door on my shop building. When I try to
open it from my driveway, just in front of my garage door, it won't
open. However, if I tuck the remote under my chin, like described
above, it will open from there. So that part does work.
I don't know how to aim a car remote control; none of those I've seen
have any obvious aerial or direction-indicator. They seem to operate at
radio wavelengths, and I have noticed that putting a radio receiver
close to my body can affect reception - not always for the better - so I
suppose body proximity might make a car remote control work better (or
worse). I'm not sure that I want to use my body or any part of it as a
radio amplifier though.

I have heard of malefactors using radio amplification equipment to
operate 'keyless' car systems from a much greater distance than
normal; they detect the code emitted by the owner's device, by using a
sensitive receiver at a distance, then transmit the unlock signal also
from a safe distance so that they can just walk up to the car, get in,
and drive off.

TV remote controls all seem to be infra-red line-of-sight devices, so
pointing one of those at your chin will only work if your chin reflects
enough IR back to the TV.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-07-31 21:47:26 UTC
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On Mon, 31 Jul 2017 18:35:11 +0100, Whiskers
Post by Whiskers
Post by Tim Wright
Post by Charles Bishop
Car Talk is in repeats, of course, and "today" (30 July, 2017) they
had the question about extending the range of a car remote, by
pointing it, not in the direction of the vehicle, but back at the
chin of the person holding it. They then extended this to a tv
remote's operation.
Did we (FCVO) ever figure out if this was possible? I suppose, given
a large enough car parking lot I could find out what the range was,
with and without a chin, but I'll ask here first.
I don't know about car remotes, but I doubt it would work with a TV
remote since most of them are IR and thus line of sight.
I have a GDO on the roll up door on my shop building. When I try to
open it from my driveway, just in front of my garage door, it won't
open. However, if I tuck the remote under my chin, like described
above, it will open from there. So that part does work.
I don't know how to aim a car remote control; none of those I've seen
have any obvious aerial or direction-indicator. They seem to operate at
radio wavelengths, and I have noticed that putting a radio receiver
close to my body can affect reception - not always for the better - so I
suppose body proximity might make a car remote control work better (or
worse). I'm not sure that I want to use my body or any part of it as a
radio amplifier though.
I have heard of malefactors using radio amplification equipment to
operate 'keyless' car systems from a much greater distance than
normal; they detect the code emitted by the owner's device, by using a
sensitive receiver at a distance, then transmit the unlock signal also
from a safe distance so that they can just walk up to the car, get in,
and drive off.
TV remote controls all seem to be infra-red line-of-sight devices, so
pointing one of those at your chin will only work if your chin reflects
enough IR back to the TV.
aerial =|= antenna

Car remotes are usually in the 400-450mHz range

I've been working around RF most of my life, at times _very_
strong RF. I've never noticed
anythingggggggggggggggwwwwrrooonnggg
Peter Boulding
2017-07-31 23:24:30 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
Car remotes are usually in the 400-450mHz range
Wikipedia and others claim that 315 MHz is the norm in North American
cars---following after Ford, who were the first to introduce keyless
entry---and 433.92 MHz for cars made in Europe, Japan and elsewhere in Asia.
I don't know why the rest of the world didn't follow the US; in the case of
all that new tech that came out of Britain in the nineteenth century, others
tended to go down a slightly different road having had the opportunity to
learn from our early mistakes, but nowadays such differences tend to exist
thanks to the attempts of corporates to make life a little more difficult
for their competitors (current HTML standards are a classic example of
this).
--
Regards, Peter Boulding
***@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk (to e-mail, remove "UNSPAM")
Fractal Images and Music: http://www.pboulding.co.uk/
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=794240&content=music
B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-08-01 06:11:02 UTC
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On Tue, 01 Aug 2017 00:24:30 +0100, Peter Boulding
Post by Peter Boulding
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
Car remotes are usually in the 400-450mHz range
Wikipedia and others claim that 315 MHz is the norm in North American
cars---following after Ford, who were the first to introduce keyless
entry---and 433.92 MHz for cars made in Europe, Japan and elsewhere in Asia.
I don't know why the rest of the world didn't follow the US; in the case of
all that new tech that came out of Britain in the nineteenth century, others
tended to go down a slightly different road having had the opportunity to
learn from our early mistakes, but nowadays such differences tend to exist
thanks to the attempts of corporates to make life a little more difficult
for their competitors (current HTML standards are a classic example of
this).
Would you believe that I just pulled that out of my ass?
Peter Boulding
2017-08-01 07:09:40 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Tue, 01 Aug 2017 00:24:30 +0100, Peter Boulding
Post by Peter Boulding
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
Car remotes are usually in the 400-450mHz range
Wikipedia and others claim that 315 MHz is the norm in North American
cars---following after Ford, who were the first to introduce keyless
entry---and 433.92 MHz for cars made in Europe, Japan and elsewhere in Asia.
I don't know why the rest of the world didn't follow the US; in the case of
all that new tech that came out of Britain in the nineteenth century, others
tended to go down a slightly different road having had the opportunity to
learn from our early mistakes, but nowadays such differences tend to exist
thanks to the attempts of corporates to make life a little more difficult
for their competitors (current HTML standards are a classic example of
this).
Would you believe that I just pulled that out of my ass?
Not really.
--
Regards, Peter Boulding
***@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk (to e-mail, remove "UNSPAM")
Fractal Images and Music: http://www.pboulding.co.uk/
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=794240&content=music
B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-08-01 07:20:54 UTC
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On Tue, 01 Aug 2017 08:09:40 +0100, Peter Boulding
Post by Peter Boulding
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
Would you believe that I just pulled that out of my ass?
Not really.
Well, not literally.
Questor
2017-08-01 15:08:39 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
aerial =|= antenna
I'll bite. What's the diff? (Other than one word seems to have a surfeit of
vowels, and the other has a lot of n's.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2017-08-02 08:59:15 UTC
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Post by Questor
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
aerial =|= antenna
I'll bite. What's the diff? (Other than one word seems to have a
surfeit of vowels, and the other has a lot of n's.
One's for transmitters the other's for receivers?
I'think there might be an online dictionary somewhere on the interweb these
days.
Whiskers
2017-08-02 12:28:34 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Questor
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
aerial =|= antenna
I'll bite. What's the diff? (Other than one word seems to have a
surfeit of vowels, and the other has a lot of n's.
One's for transmitters the other's for receivers?
I'think there might be an online dictionary somewhere on the interweb these
days.
You generally don't see aerials on beetles, but they do have antennae.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-08-02 17:19:48 UTC
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On Wed, 2 Aug 2017 13:28:34 +0100, Whiskers
Post by Whiskers
You generally don't see aerials on beetles, but they do have antennae.
TY

Antennae receive signals, aerials are elevated (up in the air
(aer)) antennae
Whiskers
2017-08-02 17:34:09 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Wed, 2 Aug 2017 13:28:34 +0100, Whiskers
Post by Whiskers
You generally don't see aerials on beetles, but they do have antennae.
TY
Antennae receive signals, aerials are elevated (up in the air
(aer)) antennae
BrE doesn't distinguish between elevated aerials and others. They're
all aerials - transmitting, receiving, or both.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Snidely
2017-08-03 07:00:43 UTC
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Just this Wednesday, Whiskers explained that ...
Post by Whiskers
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Wed, 2 Aug 2017 13:28:34 +0100, Whiskers
Post by Whiskers
You generally don't see aerials on beetles, but they do have antennae.
TY
Antennae receive signals, aerials are elevated (up in the air
(aer)) antennae
BrE doesn't distinguish between elevated aerials and others. They're
all aerials - transmitting, receiving, or both.
Even when they are hidden inside an iPhone or a
fob-the-size-of-your-thumb?

/dps
--
"What do you think of my cart, Miss Morland? A neat one, is not it?
Well hung: curricle-hung in fact. Come sit by me and we'll test the
springs."
(Speculative fiction by H.Lacedaemonian.)
Whiskers
2017-08-03 13:56:23 UTC
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Post by Snidely
Just this Wednesday, Whiskers explained that ...
Post by Whiskers
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Wed, 2 Aug 2017 13:28:34 +0100, Whiskers
Post by Whiskers
You generally don't see aerials on beetles, but they do have antennae.
TY
Antennae receive signals, aerials are elevated (up in the air
(aer)) antennae
BrE doesn't distinguish between elevated aerials and others. They're
all aerials - transmitting, receiving, or both.
Even when they are hidden inside an iPhone or a
fob-the-size-of-your-thumb?
/dps
Yes. Even if they're carbon rods set in plastic with wire coiled around
them.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-08-03 19:16:33 UTC
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On Thu, 3 Aug 2017 14:56:23 +0100, Whiskers
Post by Whiskers
Post by Snidely
Just this Wednesday, Whiskers explained that ...
Post by Whiskers
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Wed, 2 Aug 2017 13:28:34 +0100, Whiskers
Post by Whiskers
You generally don't see aerials on beetles, but they do have antennae.
TY
Antennae receive signals, aerials are elevated (up in the air
(aer)) antennae
BrE doesn't distinguish between elevated aerials and others. They're
all aerials - transmitting, receiving, or both.
Even when they are hidden inside an iPhone or a
fob-the-size-of-your-thumb?
/dps
Yes. Even if they're carbon rods set in plastic with wire coiled around
them.
I regret bringing it...up.
Greg Goss
2017-08-01 15:07:05 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
I have heard of malefactors using radio amplification equipment to
operate 'keyless' car systems from a much greater distance than
normal; they detect the code emitted by the owner's device, by using a
sensitive receiver at a distance, then transmit the unlock signal also
from a safe distance so that they can just walk up to the car, get in,
and drive off.
I thought that modern car radio locks were smarter (in some way) to
prevent "play it again, Sam" attacks.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Questor
2017-08-01 15:08:19 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
I have heard of malefactors using radio amplification equipment to
operate 'keyless' car systems from a much greater distance than
normal; they detect the code emitted by the owner's device, by using a
sensitive receiver at a distance, then transmit the unlock signal also
from a safe distance so that they can just walk up to the car, get in,
and drive off.
I have also heard of this... the thief/joyrider has a wireless repeater that
picks up the signal from the keyfob and re-broadcasts it... while they stand
next to your car. The door unlocks, the car can be started and then driven
away. If it stops it can't be restarted, but obviously that's of little
concern.
Post by Whiskers
TV remote controls all seem to be infra-red line-of-sight devices, so
pointing one of those at your chin will only work if your chin reflects
enough IR back to the TV.
I have found the signal from IR remotes bounces off walls and other similar flat
surfaces quite readily and works at some distance. Fabric-covered furniture and
other similar "soft" items, not so much.
Charles Bishop
2017-08-01 21:54:10 UTC
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Post by Questor
Post by Whiskers
I have heard of malefactors using radio amplification equipment to
operate 'keyless' car systems from a much greater distance than
normal; they detect the code emitted by the owner's device, by using a
sensitive receiver at a distance, then transmit the unlock signal also
from a safe distance so that they can just walk up to the car, get in,
and drive off.
I have also heard of this... the thief/joyrider has a wireless repeater that
picks up the signal from the keyfob and re-broadcasts it... while they stand
next to your car. The door unlocks, the car can be started and then driven
away. If it stops it can't be restarted, but obviously that's of little
concern.
How is the car started. "I've also heard of this" isn't a reference to
inspire confidence. No insult intended though. Do we need NIIT added to
the AF? (acronym file)
Post by Questor
Post by Whiskers
TV remote controls all seem to be infra-red line-of-sight devices, so
pointing one of those at your chin will only work if your chin reflects
enough IR back to the TV.
I have found the signal from IR remotes bounces off walls and other similar flat
surfaces quite readily and works at some distance. Fabric-covered furniture and
other similar "soft" items, not so much.
--
charles
Whiskers
2017-08-01 23:39:02 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Questor
Post by Whiskers
I have heard of malefactors using radio amplification equipment to
operate 'keyless' car systems from a much greater distance than
normal; they detect the code emitted by the owner's device, by using a
sensitive receiver at a distance, then transmit the unlock signal also
from a safe distance so that they can just walk up to the car, get in,
and drive off.
I have also heard of this... the thief/joyrider has a wireless repeater that
picks up the signal from the keyfob and re-broadcasts it... while they stand
next to your car. The door unlocks, the car can be started and then driven
away. If it stops it can't be restarted, but obviously that's of little
concern.
How is the car started. "I've also heard of this" isn't a reference to
inspire confidence. No insult intended though. Do we need NIIT added to
the AF? (acronym file)
[...]

Starter button? 'Keyless' cars don't have 'ignition keys', they rely on
the presence in or near the car of the appropriate radio transceiver
gadget to release all the normal 'security'.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Questor
2017-08-03 15:34:56 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Questor
Post by Whiskers
I have heard of malefactors using radio amplification equipment to
operate 'keyless' car systems from a much greater distance than
normal; they detect the code emitted by the owner's device, by using a
sensitive receiver at a distance, then transmit the unlock signal also
from a safe distance so that they can just walk up to the car, get in,
and drive off.
I have also heard of this... the thief/joyrider has a wireless repeater that
picks up the signal from the keyfob and re-broadcasts it... while they stand
next to your car. The door unlocks, the car can be started and then driven
away. If it stops it can't be restarted, but obviously that's of little
concern.
How is the car started. "I've also heard of this" isn't a reference to
inspire confidence. No insult intended though. Do we need NIIT added to
the AF? (acronym file)
I guess so, because I don't get "NIIT."

Anyway, as explicated elsewhere, so-called "keyless" entry & ignition systems
use a little fob-thingy that transmits a weak signal. When the vehicle detects
said signal, the doors unlock and the car can be started.
Snidely
2017-08-07 07:21:19 UTC
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Post by Questor
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Questor
Post by Whiskers
I have heard of malefactors using radio amplification equipment to
operate 'keyless' car systems from a much greater distance than
normal; they detect the code emitted by the owner's device, by using a
sensitive receiver at a distance, then transmit the unlock signal also
from a safe distance so that they can just walk up to the car, get in,
and drive off.
I have also heard of this... the thief/joyrider has a wireless repeater
that picks up the signal from the keyfob and re-broadcasts it... while they
stand next to your car. The door unlocks, the car can be started and then
driven away. If it stops it can't be restarted, but obviously that's of
little concern.
How is the car started. "I've also heard of this" isn't a reference to
inspire confidence. No insult intended though. Do we need NIIT added to
the AF? (acronym file)
I guess so, because I don't get "NIIT."
It was pretty clear on the second reading of Charlie's paragraph.
Post by Questor
Anyway, as explicated elsewhere, so-called "keyless" entry & ignition systems
use a little fob-thingy that transmits a weak signal. When the vehicle
detects said signal, the doors unlock and the car can be started.
To escape the Urban Legend label, documented cases might restore some
confidence in the reports. And do any of these keyless starters have a
kill switch if the fob signal disappears?

/dps "as in factory-installed"
--
"What do you think of my cart, Miss Morland? A neat one, is not it?
Well hung: curricle-hung in fact. Come sit by me and we'll test the
springs."
(Speculative fiction by H.Lacedaemonian.)
Whiskers
2017-08-07 11:58:19 UTC
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Post by Snidely
On Tue, 01 Aug 2017 14:54:10 -0700, Charles Bishop
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Mon, 31 Jul 2017 18:35:11 +0100, Whiskers
Post by Whiskers
I have heard of malefactors using radio amplification equipment to
operate 'keyless' car systems from a much greater distance than
normal; they detect the code emitted by the owner's device, by
using a sensitive receiver at a distance, then transmit the unlock
signal also from a safe distance so that they can just walk up to
the car, get in, and drive off.
I have also heard of this... the thief/joyrider has a wireless
repeater that picks up the signal from the keyfob and re-broadcasts
it... while they stand next to your car. The door unlocks, the car
can be started and then driven away. If it stops it can't be
restarted, but obviously that's of little concern.
How is the car started. "I've also heard of this" isn't a reference
to inspire confidence. No insult intended though. Do we need NIIT
added to the AF? (acronym file)
I guess so, because I don't get "NIIT."
It was pretty clear on the second reading of Charlie's paragraph.
Anyway, as explicated elsewhere, so-called "keyless" entry & ignition
systems use a little fob-thingy that transmits a weak signal. When
the vehicle detects said signal, the doors unlock and the car can be
started.
To escape the Urban Legend label, documented cases might restore some
confidence in the reports. And do any of these keyless starters have
a kill switch if the fob signal disappears?
/dps "as in factory-installed"
Not hard to find reports on line
<https://www.ixquick.eu/do/search?q=keyless+car+theft>. As it happens
there's an item about it on BBC Radio 4 'You and Yours' programme as I
type. <http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08zzlk0>

This report is about people getting jailed for doing it
<https://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/keyless-car-theft-victims-praise-police-operation-as-gang-are-jailed-a3171771.html>
<http://preview.tinyurl.com/y964pd5y>

Snopes seem to be a bit out of touch, though
<http://www.snopes.com/autos/techno/lockcode.asp>.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Greg Goss
2017-08-02 05:32:23 UTC
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Post by Questor
Post by Whiskers
TV remote controls all seem to be infra-red line-of-sight devices, so
pointing one of those at your chin will only work if your chin reflects
enough IR back to the TV.
I have found the signal from IR remotes bounces off walls and other similar flat
surfaces quite readily and works at some distance. Fabric-covered furniture and
other similar "soft" items, not so much.
I find that "whiteness" matters more than "hardness". And my living
room in the eighties was extremely sunny and light coloured - it was
very difficult to get the VCR to pay attention to the remote. (My LR
TV at the time wasn't remote controlled. The bedroom TV was a
push-button TV with a rubber-tipped 6 foot CB antenna as a remote.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Charles Bishop
2017-08-01 21:52:42 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by Tim Wright
Post by Charles Bishop
Car Talk is in repeats, of course, and "today" (30 July, 2017) they
had the question about extending the range of a car remote, by
pointing it, not in the direction of the vehicle, but back at the
chin of the person holding it. They then extended this to a tv
remote's operation.
Did we (FCVO) ever figure out if this was possible? I suppose, given
a large enough car parking lot I could find out what the range was,
with and without a chin, but I'll ask here first.
I don't know about car remotes, but I doubt it would work with a TV
remote since most of them are IR and thus line of sight.
I have a GDO on the roll up door on my shop building. When I try to
open it from my driveway, just in front of my garage door, it won't
open. However, if I tuck the remote under my chin, like described
above, it will open from there. So that part does work.
I don't know how to aim a car remote control; none of those I've seen
have any obvious aerial or direction-indicator. They seem to operate at
radio wavelengths, and I have noticed that putting a radio receiver
close to my body can affect reception - not always for the better - so I
suppose body proximity might make a car remote control work better (or
worse). I'm not sure that I want to use my body or any part of it as a
radio amplifier though.
I have heard of malefactors using radio amplification equipment to
operate 'keyless' car systems from a much greater distance than
normal; they detect the code emitted by the owner's device, by using a
sensitive receiver at a distance, then transmit the unlock signal also
from a safe distance so that they can just walk up to the car, get in,
and drive off.
TV remote controls all seem to be infra-red line-of-sight devices, so
pointing one of those at your chin will only work if your chin reflects
enough IR back to the TV.
Someone else mentioned this, but please remember, the Car Talk has been
on for <mumble> years (30?) and so back then there were tv remotes that
used sound waves.
--
charles, ultra ultra secret sound waves
Greg Goss
2017-08-02 05:33:50 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
Someone else mentioned this, but please remember, the Car Talk has been
on for <mumble> years (30?) and so back then there were tv remotes that
used sound waves.
A friend of mine used to use a box of steel nuts and bolts to turn his
TV on or adjust the volume. He had to use the legit "ker-chunk"
remote to adjust the channel.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-07-31 21:42:56 UTC
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On Mon, 31 Jul 2017 08:04:02 -0500, Tim Wright
Post by Tim Wright
I have a GDO on the roll up door on my shop building. When I try to
open it from my driveway, just in front of my garage door, it won't
open. However, if I tuck the remote under my chin, like described
above, it will open from there. So that part does work.
The blurb I saw was you pointed the remote at your temple, and
that increased the range. Tried it. It worked.

Had my remote apart just the other day to replace the battery. I
didn't notice anything which would appear to be the actual
antenna of it, but since you must hold it according to its shape,
there's "natural" pointing end. That's what I use, then 'point'
my other temple at the target. Works.

I have several pieces of paper which claim to bestow electronical
knowledge on me. I can not explain the above mentioned
phenomenon.
Whiskers
2017-08-01 00:07:03 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Mon, 31 Jul 2017 08:04:02 -0500, Tim Wright
Post by Tim Wright
I have a GDO on the roll up door on my shop building. When I try to
open it from my driveway, just in front of my garage door, it won't
open. However, if I tuck the remote under my chin, like described
above, it will open from there. So that part does work.
The blurb I saw was you pointed the remote at your temple, and
that increased the range. Tried it. It worked.
Had my remote apart just the other day to replace the battery. I
didn't notice anything which would appear to be the actual
antenna of it, but since you must hold it according to its shape,
there's "natural" pointing end. That's what I use, then 'point'
my other temple at the target. Works.
I have several pieces of paper which claim to bestow electronical
knowledge on me. I can not explain the above mentioned
phenomenon.
Obviously whatever you did to get those electronical papers, made your
brain into a magnifier or focuser of radio waves. Would a human skull
function as a 'wave guide' at the frequencies involved? Something like
the 'Pringles can' WiFi thing?
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
bill van
2017-08-01 00:18:37 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Mon, 31 Jul 2017 08:04:02 -0500, Tim Wright
Post by Tim Wright
I have a GDO on the roll up door on my shop building. When I try to
open it from my driveway, just in front of my garage door, it won't
open. However, if I tuck the remote under my chin, like described
above, it will open from there. So that part does work.
The blurb I saw was you pointed the remote at your temple, and
that increased the range. Tried it. It worked.
Had my remote apart just the other day to replace the battery. I
didn't notice anything which would appear to be the actual
antenna of it, but since you must hold it according to its shape,
there's "natural" pointing end. That's what I use, then 'point'
my other temple at the target. Works.
I have several pieces of paper which claim to bestow electronical
knowledge on me. I can not explain the above mentioned
phenomenon.
You're voluntarily running some kind of radiation through your brain.
I understand that the debate remains active about whether radio
signals such as those used by cell phones can cause cancer. I think
I'll keep pointing my remotes at my electronic devices until further
notice.
--
bill
Kerr-Mudd,John
2017-08-01 09:39:59 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Mon, 31 Jul 2017 08:04:02 -0500, Tim Wright
Post by Tim Wright
I have a GDO on the roll up door on my shop building. When I try to
open it from my driveway, just in front of my garage door, it won't
open. However, if I tuck the remote under my chin, like described
above, it will open from there. So that part does work.
The blurb I saw was you pointed the remote at your temple, and
that increased the range. Tried it. It worked.
Had my remote apart just the other day to replace the battery. I
didn't notice anything which would appear to be the actual
antenna of it, but since you must hold it according to its shape,
there's "natural" pointing end. That's what I use, then 'point'
my other temple at the target. Works.
I have several pieces of paper which claim to bestow electronical
knowledge on me. I can not explain the above mentioned
phenomenon.
You're voluntarily running some kind of radiation through your brain.
I understand that the debate remains active about whether radio
signals such as those used by cell phones can cause cancer. I think
I'll keep pointing my remotes at my electronic devices until further
notice.
Please can I ask:
Why is your Captain Haddock surrounded by flies? EMNTK. TIA, HAND.
Charles Bishop
2017-08-01 21:48:41 UTC
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Post by Tim Wright
Post by Charles Bishop
Car Talk is in repeats, of course, and "today" (30 July, 2017) they had
the question about extending the range of a car remote, by pointing it,
not in the direction of the vehicle, but back at the chin of the person
holding it. They then extended this to a tv remote's operation.
Did we (FCVO) ever figure out if this was possible? I suppose, given a
large enough car parking lot I could find out what the range was, with
and without a chin, but I'll ask here first.
I don't know about car remotes, but I doubt it would work with a TV
remote since most of them are IR and thus line of sight.
I have a GDO on the roll up door on my shop building. When I try to
open it from my driveway, just in front of my garage door, it won't
open. However, if I tuck the remote under my chin, like described
above, it will open from there. So that part does work.
I'd like to know the relative locations of your garage (door) and your
shop? Is your shop inside the garage? It doesn't seem so from your
description but it's best to check.
--
halsk
Tim Wright
2017-08-01 22:16:47 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Tim Wright
Post by Charles Bishop
Car Talk is in repeats, of course, and "today" (30 July, 2017) they had
the question about extending the range of a car remote, by pointing it,
not in the direction of the vehicle, but back at the chin of the person
holding it. They then extended this to a tv remote's operation.
Did we (FCVO) ever figure out if this was possible? I suppose, given a
large enough car parking lot I could find out what the range was, with
and without a chin, but I'll ask here first.
I don't know about car remotes, but I doubt it would work with a TV
remote since most of them are IR and thus line of sight.
I have a GDO on the roll up door on my shop building. When I try to
open it from my driveway, just in front of my garage door, it won't
open. However, if I tuck the remote under my chin, like described
above, it will open from there. So that part does work.
I'd like to know the relative locations of your garage (door) and your
shop? Is your shop inside the garage? It doesn't seem so from your
description but it's best to check.
Loading Image... Measurement is from Google Earth.
--
Studies have shown that the people of Dubai don't understand the humor
of the Flintstones, but the people of Abu Dhabi do.

Tim W
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