Discussion:
Roundup at the Cart corrL
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John Mc.
2017-08-04 12:55:19 UTC
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<https://www.craigdacy.com/single-post/2016/09/12/What-Returning-Your-Shopping-Cart-Says-About-You>



"I have a pet peeve. You know when you’re at the grocery store and you see
shopping carts littered around the parking lot? That drives me
insane......"


I feel his pain. My cart goes to the corral mostly. The exception being-
as I've said I park out in BFE. And usually take two spaces. (I've grown
tired of dings and chips because SFB in his POS car just slams his door
into me). Anyway I NEVER do this with a full or nearly full lot. Now if I
walk out to BFE past empty space after empty space only to find SFB parked
right next to me. I will VERY VERY gently put my cart right the ***** up
against his driver's door. Just making a point.

John Mc.
Charles Bishop
2017-08-04 16:53:33 UTC
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In article
Post by John Mc.
,
<https://www.craigdacy.com/single-post/2016/09/12/What-Returning-Your-Shoppin
g-Cart-Says-About-You>
"I have a pet peeve. You know when you’re at the grocery store and you see
shopping carts littered around the parking lot? That drives me
insane......"
I feel his pain. My cart goes to the corral mostly. The exception being-
as I've said I park out in BFE. And usually take two spaces. (I've grown
tired of dings and chips because SFB in his POS car just slams his door
into me). Anyway I NEVER do this with a full or nearly full lot. Now if I
walk out to BFE past empty space after empty space only to find SFB parked
right next to me. I will VERY VERY gently put my cart right the ***** up
against his driver's door. Just making a point.
Something else. Some parking lot aisle are arranged with two way
traffic. So, if I pull into a spot, and the spot opposite me is empty, I
can, when I return to the car, pull straight out and not have to
reverse. I haven't kept track, but I think that more often than not, in
that case, someone else will park in front of my truck when there are
spaces on either side of me that are empty.
--
charles, tell them to knock it off
Whiskers
2017-08-04 17:41:50 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
In article
Post by John Mc.
,
<https://www.craigdacy.com/single-post/2016/09/12/What-Returning-Your-Shoppin
g-Cart-Says-About-You>
"I have a pet peeve. You know when you’re at the grocery store and you see
shopping carts littered around the parking lot? That drives me
insane......"
I feel his pain. My cart goes to the corral mostly. The exception being-
as I've said I park out in BFE. And usually take two spaces. (I've grown
tired of dings and chips because SFB in his POS car just slams his door
into me). Anyway I NEVER do this with a full or nearly full lot. Now if I
walk out to BFE past empty space after empty space only to find SFB parked
right next to me. I will VERY VERY gently put my cart right the ***** up
against his driver's door. Just making a point.
Something else. Some parking lot aisle are arranged with two way
traffic. So, if I pull into a spot, and the spot opposite me is empty, I
can, when I return to the car, pull straight out and not have to
reverse.
If I pull into a space and notice that the space in front is also empty
and that I can drive safely into it, then I often do so to avoid the
need to reverse out. That's particularly nice if the vehicle I'm
driving is difficult to reverse.
Post by Charles Bishop
I haven't kept track, but I think that more often than not, in
that case, someone else will park in front of my truck when there are
spaces on either side of me that are empty.
But presumably in that case the space in front of you was occupied when
you parked, or you would have driven into it, so you haven't actually
lost out.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Les Albert
2017-08-04 17:58:37 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by John Mc.
<https://www.craigdacy.com/single-post/2016/09/12/What-Returning-Your-Shoppin
g-Cart-Says-About-You>
"I have a pet peeve. You know when you’re at the grocery store and you see
shopping carts littered around the parking lot? That drives me
insane......"
I feel his pain. My cart goes to the corral mostly. The exception being-
as I've said I park out in BFE. And usually take two spaces. (I've grown
tired of dings and chips because SFB in his POS car just slams his door
into me). Anyway I NEVER do this with a full or nearly full lot. Now if I
walk out to BFE past empty space after empty space only to find SFB parked
right next to me. I will VERY VERY gently put my cart right the ***** up
against his driver's door. Just making a point.
Something else. Some parking lot aisle are arranged with two way
traffic. So, if I pull into a spot, and the spot opposite me is empty, I
can, when I return to the car, pull straight out and not have to
reverse.
If I pull into a space and notice that the space in front is also empty
and that I can drive safely into it, then I often do so to avoid the
need to reverse out. That's particularly nice if the vehicle I'm
driving is difficult to reverse.
...
It sounds like you rent cars when needed. What makes any of the
vehicles you drive difficult to reverse?

Les
Whiskers
2017-08-04 23:25:54 UTC
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Post by Les Albert
Post by Whiskers
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by John Mc.
<https://www.craigdacy.com/single-post/2016/09/12/What-Returning-Your-Shoppin
g-Cart-Says-About-You>
"I have a pet peeve. You know when you’re at the grocery store and you see
shopping carts littered around the parking lot? That drives me
insane......"
I feel his pain. My cart goes to the corral mostly. The exception being-
as I've said I park out in BFE. And usually take two spaces. (I've grown
tired of dings and chips because SFB in his POS car just slams his door
into me). Anyway I NEVER do this with a full or nearly full lot. Now if I
walk out to BFE past empty space after empty space only to find SFB parked
right next to me. I will VERY VERY gently put my cart right the ***** up
against his driver's door. Just making a point.
Something else. Some parking lot aisle are arranged with two way
traffic. So, if I pull into a spot, and the spot opposite me is empty, I
can, when I return to the car, pull straight out and not have to
reverse.
If I pull into a space and notice that the space in front is also empty
and that I can drive safely into it, then I often do so to avoid the
need to reverse out. That's particularly nice if the vehicle I'm
driving is difficult to reverse.
...
It sounds like you rent cars when needed. What makes any of the
vehicles you drive difficult to reverse?
Les
I recently acquired a classic campervan, and it's taking some time to
get used to it. There's a lot of it behind the driver's seat which is
above the front axle, and the windows are high enough off the ground for
low things outside to be completely invisible, so I have to use all the
mirrors a lot as well as look backwards - and if in doubt, stop get out
and walk around to see how much space I still have. Not having power
steering means it isn't as nimble as modern cars (but my upper body is
getting a good workout). The beeping reverse helper does help, but
doesn't seem to detect everything I might prefer not to hit (and almost
attracts pedestrians to wander into my path). The car is a lot more
modern, so it has bulging bodywork and headrests and silly-shaped rear
windows, but it isn't quite as tricky as the van. The car is actually
slightly wider than the van (but a lot lower, and significantly
shorter).
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Les Albert
2017-08-04 23:47:37 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by Les Albert
Post by Whiskers
If I pull into a space and notice that the space in front is also empty
and that I can drive safely into it, then I often do so to avoid the
need to reverse out. That's particularly nice if the vehicle I'm
driving is difficult to reverse.
...
It sounds like you rent cars when needed. What makes any of the
vehicles you drive difficult to reverse?
I recently acquired a classic campervan, and it's taking some time to
get used to it. There's a lot of it behind the driver's seat which is
above the front axle, and the windows are high enough off the ground for
low things outside to be completely invisible, so I have to use all the
mirrors a lot as well as look backwards - and if in doubt, stop get out
and walk around to see how much space I still have. Not having power
steering means it isn't as nimble as modern cars (but my upper body is
getting a good workout). The beeping reverse helper does help, but
doesn't seem to detect everything I might prefer not to hit (and almost
attracts pedestrians to wander into my path). The car is a lot more
modern, so it has bulging bodywork and headrests and silly-shaped rear
windows, but it isn't quite as tricky as the van. The car is actually
slightly wider than the van (but a lot lower, and significantly
shorter).
Now I get the picture. When you said the vehicles you drive were
difficult to reverse I thought maybe they were standard shift, and the
shift pattern for reverse was difficult to get engaged. What you
describe is something that I see a lot with drivers and the humongous
sized SUVs that have become popular; many of them don't seem to know
how to judge where the back of vehicle is when they are backing up.

Les
HVS
2017-08-05 00:39:23 UTC
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On Sat, 5 Aug 2017 00:25:54 +0100, Whiskers
Post by Whiskers
On Fri, 4 Aug 2017 18:41:50 +0100, Whiskers
Post by Whiskers
If I pull into a space and notice that the space in front is also empty
and that I can drive safely into it, then I often do so to avoid the
need to reverse out. That's particularly nice if the vehicle I'm
driving is difficult to reverse.
...
It sounds like you rent cars when needed. What makes any of the
vehicles you drive difficult to reverse?
I recently acquired a classic campervan, and it's taking some time to
get used to it. There's a lot of it behind the driver's seat
which is
Post by Whiskers
above the front axle, and the windows are high enough off the
ground for
Post by Whiskers
low things outside to be completely invisible, so I have to use all the
mirrors a lot as well as look backwards - and if in doubt, stop get out
and walk around to see how much space I still have. Not having power
steering means it isn't as nimble as modern cars (but my upper body is
getting a good workout). The beeping reverse helper does help, but
doesn't seem to detect everything I might prefer not to hit (and almost
attracts pedestrians to wander into my path). The car is a lot more
modern, so it has bulging bodywork and headrests and silly-shaped rear
windows, but it isn't quite as tricky as the van. The car is
actually
Post by Whiskers
slightly wider than the van (but a lot lower, and significantly
shorter).
Now I get the picture. When you said the vehicles you drive were
difficult to reverse I thought maybe they were standard shift, and the
shift pattern for reverse was difficult to get engaged. What you
describe is something that I see a lot with drivers and the
humongous
sized SUVs that have become popular; many of them don't seem to know
how to judge where the back of vehicle is when they are backing up.
It's a problem that's gradually dying out, though: modern ones I've
seen - say 5 or 10 years old - have sensors and cameras to help with
that. (Friends in New Zealand had an older one, but they'd
retro-fitted a camera to it.)
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanE (30 years) & BrE (34 years),
indiscriminately mixed
Whiskers
2017-08-05 13:06:54 UTC
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Post by Les Albert
Post by Whiskers
Post by Les Albert
Post by Whiskers
If I pull into a space and notice that the space in front is also empty
and that I can drive safely into it, then I often do so to avoid the
need to reverse out. That's particularly nice if the vehicle I'm
driving is difficult to reverse.
...
It sounds like you rent cars when needed. What makes any of the
vehicles you drive difficult to reverse?
I recently acquired a classic campervan, and it's taking some time to
get used to it. There's a lot of it behind the driver's seat which is
above the front axle, and the windows are high enough off the ground for
low things outside to be completely invisible, so I have to use all the
mirrors a lot as well as look backwards - and if in doubt, stop get out
and walk around to see how much space I still have. Not having power
steering means it isn't as nimble as modern cars (but my upper body is
getting a good workout). The beeping reverse helper does help, but
doesn't seem to detect everything I might prefer not to hit (and almost
attracts pedestrians to wander into my path). The car is a lot more
modern, so it has bulging bodywork and headrests and silly-shaped rear
windows, but it isn't quite as tricky as the van. The car is actually
slightly wider than the van (but a lot lower, and significantly
shorter).
Now I get the picture. When you said the vehicles you drive were
difficult to reverse I thought maybe they were standard shift, and the
shift pattern for reverse was difficult to get engaged. What you
describe is something that I see a lot with drivers and the humongous
sized SUVs that have become popular; many of them don't seem to know
how to judge where the back of vehicle is when they are backing up.
Les
I would have said 'selecting reverse gear is difficult' if that's what
I'd meant, I think. It would have to be very difficult to deter me from
mastering it though - in which case I'd suspect a mechanical fault and
get it attended to. (For the record, I have driven cars with automatic
transmission, but not much and have never owned one).

Long vehicles are more difficult to drive backwards, unless the driver
sits very near the back - in which case going forwards may be more
difficult.

An interesting development on 'dust carts' and 'street cleaners' around
here, is to have 'four wheel steering', which makes manoeuvring in tight
spaces a lot easier.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Greg Goss
2017-08-05 20:43:08 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
An interesting development on 'dust carts' and 'street cleaners' around
here, is to have 'four wheel steering', which makes manoeuvring in tight
spaces a lot easier.
I think Honda had four wheel steering on a production car in the early
nineties, and Toyota was working on it. I wonder what happened to
them?

(Quick google.) OK, they're out there. It's just that nobody talks
about them anymore.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/10-coolest-four-wheel-steering-cars-172834430.html
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Les Albert
2017-08-05 22:11:43 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Whiskers
An interesting development on 'dust carts' and 'street cleaners' around
here, is to have 'four wheel steering', which makes manoeuvring in tight
spaces a lot easier.
I think Honda had four wheel steering on a production car in the early
nineties, and Toyota was working on it. I wonder what happened to
them?
(Quick google.) OK, they're out there. It's just that nobody talks
about them anymore.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/10-coolest-four-wheel-steering-cars-172834430.html
My Mazda RX7 https://www.flickr.com/photos/***@N05/4078113263/
has rear wheel steering, but the rear steering is not controlled by
the steering wheel, it is activated by cornering load. It's called
Dynamic Tracking System: the rear wheels, under hard cornering load,
become an active part of the steering system, changing from toe out
during low G cornering to toe in under high G acceleration cornering.

Les
Whiskers
2017-08-06 13:20:17 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Whiskers
An interesting development on 'dust carts' and 'street cleaners' around
here, is to have 'four wheel steering', which makes manoeuvring in tight
spaces a lot easier.
I think Honda had four wheel steering on a production car in the early
nineties, and Toyota was working on it. I wonder what happened to
them?
(Quick google.) OK, they're out there. It's just that nobody talks
about them anymore.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/10-coolest-four-wheel-steering-cars-172834430.html
I had a '97 Citroën with 'passive' rear steering; cornering hard at
speed would make the rear wheels change their alignment somehow to
improve the handling of the car. It worked quite well.

A very similar effect can happen on vehicles with leaf springs and a
'live' back axle, as the flexing of the springs makes the alignment of
the axle change, but it may not work in a helpful or predictable manner.

The utility vehicles I've seen recently, give the driver some control
over how the two ends steer at manoeuvring speed.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Tim Wright
2017-08-06 13:38:49 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Whiskers
An interesting development on 'dust carts' and 'street cleaners' around
here, is to have 'four wheel steering', which makes manoeuvring in tight
spaces a lot easier.
I think Honda had four wheel steering on a production car in the early
nineties, and Toyota was working on it. I wonder what happened to
them?
(Quick google.) OK, they're out there. It's just that nobody talks
about them anymore.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/10-coolest-four-wheel-steering-cars-172834430.html
I had a '97 Citroën with 'passive' rear steering; cornering hard at
speed would make the rear wheels change their alignment somehow to
improve the handling of the car. It worked quite well.
A very similar effect can happen on vehicles with leaf springs and a
'live' back axle, as the flexing of the springs makes the alignment of
the axle change, but it may not work in a helpful or predictable manner.
The utility vehicles I've seen recently, give the driver some control
over how the two ends steer at manoeuvring speed.
Here's some rear steering for you.

--
Studies have shown that the people of Dubai don't understand the humor
of the Flintstones, but the people of Abu Dhabi do.

Tim W
Whiskers
2017-08-06 20:09:49 UTC
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Post by Tim Wright
Post by Whiskers
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Whiskers
An interesting development on 'dust carts' and 'street cleaners'
around here, is to have 'four wheel steering', which makes
manoeuvring in tight spaces a lot easier.
I think Honda had four wheel steering on a production car in the
early nineties, and Toyota was working on it. I wonder what
happened to them?
(Quick google.) OK, they're out there. It's just that nobody talks
about them anymore.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/10-coolest-four-wheel-steering-cars-172834430.html
I had a '97 Citroën with 'passive' rear steering; cornering hard at
speed would make the rear wheels change their alignment somehow to
improve the handling of the car. It worked quite well.
A very similar effect can happen on vehicles with leaf springs and a
'live' back axle, as the flexing of the springs makes the alignment
of the axle change, but it may not work in a helpful or predictable
manner.
The utility vehicles I've seen recently, give the driver some control
over how the two ends steer at manoeuvring speed.
Here's some rear steering for you.
http://youtu.be/O3Q2Is8JDqQ
Indeed. I suspect there's a second driver for the back of that
trailer!
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Les Albert
2017-08-06 20:39:40 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by Tim Wright
Here's some rear steering for you.
http://youtu.be/O3Q2Is8JDqQ
Indeed. I suspect there's a second driver for the back of that
trailer!
Your suspicions are well founded: There is a driver in the back of
that fire truck. Those kind of trucks are called "tillers" and they
were very common in NYC when I lived there, but apparently there are
not that many of them as there used to be. Here is some background
about tillers in a recent article from the NY Times:
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/23/nyregion/tiller-fire-engines.html?_r=0

Les
Greg Goss
2017-08-07 03:50:16 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by Tim Wright
Post by Whiskers
around here, is to have 'four wheel steering', which makes
Here's some rear steering for you.
http://youtu.be/O3Q2Is8JDqQ
Indeed. I suspect there's a second driver for the back of that
trailer!
You can see the guy in that high back cab.

I once followed an eighty foot or so bridge beam down the highway.
The back end was on a carrier with a low-slung seat under the beam
with a tractor-style seat ahd horizontal steering wheel. On the
highway that back seat was empty -- presumably for getting the beam
through towns.

Eventually I was able to pass him. Dunno where the bridge was going
to be -- that highway didn't have any obvious construction zones.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
John Mc.
2017-08-05 01:10:18 UTC
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Post by Les Albert
Post by Whiskers
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by John Mc.
<https://www.craigdacy.com/single-post/2016/09/12/What-Returning-Your-Shoppin
g-Cart-Says-About-You>
"I have a pet peeve. You know when you’re at the grocery store and you see
shopping carts littered around the parking lot? That drives me
insane......"
I feel his pain. My cart goes to the corral mostly. The exception being-
as I've said I park out in BFE. And usually take two spaces. (I've grown
tired of dings and chips because SFB in his POS car just slams his door
into me). Anyway I NEVER do this with a full or nearly full lot. Now if I
walk out to BFE past empty space after empty space only to find SFB parked
right next to me. I will VERY VERY gently put my cart right the ***** up
against his driver's door. Just making a point.
Something else. Some parking lot aisle are arranged with two way
traffic. So, if I pull into a spot, and the spot opposite me is empty, I
can, when I return to the car, pull straight out and not have to
reverse.
If I pull into a space and notice that the space in front is also empty
and that I can drive safely into it, then I often do so to avoid the
need to reverse out. That's particularly nice if the vehicle I'm
driving is difficult to reverse.
...
It sounds like you rent cars when needed. What makes any of the
vehicles you drive difficult to reverse?
Les
The new Tundra came with a backup camera which I guess is pretty much
standard these days. But it also came with sensors that warn you of
approaching cars as you're backing up. Nice for when you look and see no
one the a car comes barreling down the aisle toward you. I do get "false
positives" when I'm parked at the edge of a lot and the car approaching
is actually on the road behind the lot and there's no danger of it
hitting me.

John Mc.
Greg Goss
2017-08-05 20:46:22 UTC
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Post by John Mc.
The new Tundra came with a backup camera which I guess is pretty much
standard these days. But it also came with sensors that warn you of
approaching cars as you're backing up. Nice for when you look and see no
one the a car comes barreling down the aisle toward you. I do get "false
positives" when I'm parked at the edge of a lot and the car approaching
is actually on the road behind the lot and there's no danger of it
hitting me.
My new (to me -- 2013) car has rear sonar with pinging that depends on
distance. I find it useful, but there are a lot of false positives.
My parking space is in a corner with a rather awkward approach.
Backing out of it is a precision operation, and the pinger tells me
about bumpers that I've already arranged to clear. "I don't think I
CAN hit that bumper from here, so SHUT UP."

It also triggers on tire tracks in snow. Backing out of that space in
snow means I have to ignore the pinger entirely.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
John Mc.
2017-08-05 21:46:35 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by John Mc.
The new Tundra came with a backup camera which I guess is pretty much
standard these days. But it also came with sensors that warn you of
approaching cars as you're backing up. Nice for when you look and see no
one the a car comes barreling down the aisle toward you. I do get "false
positives" when I'm parked at the edge of a lot and the car approaching
is actually on the road behind the lot and there's no danger of it
hitting me.
My new (to me -- 2013) car has rear sonar with pinging that depends on
distance. I find it useful, but there are a lot of false positives.
My parking space is in a corner with a rather awkward approach.
Backing out of it is a precision operation, and the pinger tells me
about bumpers that I've already arranged to clear. "I don't think I
CAN hit that bumper from here, so SHUT UP."
It also triggers on tire tracks in snow. Backing out of that space in
snow means I have to ignore the pinger entirely.
I've the pinging sonar as well though I've a dash button to shut it off.
The back up side sensors are separate.

John Mc.
B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-08-04 18:11:13 UTC
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On Fri, 04 Aug 2017 09:53:33 -0700, Charles Bishop
Post by Charles Bishop
Something else. Some parking lot aisle are arranged with two way
traffic. So, if I pull into a spot, and the spot opposite me is empty, I
can, when I return to the car, pull straight out and not have to
reverse. I haven't kept track, but I think that more often than not, in
that case, someone else will park in front of my truck when there are
spaces on either side of me that are empty.
Sure I get that. But I'm not imbued with omnicience, so I can't
know how all the pervious cars were parked upon my return.

Sometimes some jerk will hug my driver's side white line
unmercifully, can't hardly get in the car. But, who knows, maybe
he was forced into that ugly maneuver by the guy next to him,
before. Who has by now left.
John Mc.
2017-08-05 13:57:35 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Fri, 04 Aug 2017 09:53:33 -0700, Charles Bishop
Post by Charles Bishop
Something else. Some parking lot aisle are arranged with two way
traffic. So, if I pull into a spot, and the spot opposite me is empty, I
can, when I return to the car, pull straight out and not have to
reverse. I haven't kept track, but I think that more often than not, in
that case, someone else will park in front of my truck when there are
spaces on either side of me that are empty.
Sure I get that. But I'm not imbued with omnicience, so I can't
know how all the pervious cars were parked upon my return.
Sometimes some jerk will hug my driver's side white line
unmercifully, can't hardly get in the car. But, who knows, maybe
he was forced into that ugly maneuver by the guy next to him,
before. Who has by now left.
Sort of a secondary reason to my BFE and two spaces idea. The Tundra isn't
small but if I park in the center of space and you park in the center of
yours we're fine. Happens one time in ten "maybe"

John BFE Mc.
Whiskers
2017-08-04 17:36:00 UTC
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Post by John Mc.
<https://www.craigdacy.com/single-post/2016/09/12/What-Returning-Your-Shopping-Cart-Says-About-You>
"I have a pet peeve. You know when you’re at the grocery store and you see
shopping carts littered around the parking lot? That drives me
insane......"
I feel his pain. My cart goes to the corral mostly. The exception being-
as I've said I park out in BFE. And usually take two spaces. (I've grown
tired of dings and chips because SFB in his POS car just slams his door
into me). Anyway I NEVER do this with a full or nearly full lot. Now if I
walk out to BFE past empty space after empty space only to find SFB parked
right next to me. I will VERY VERY gently put my cart right the ***** up
against his driver's door. Just making a point.
John Mc.
I don't know what point you think you're making, but what a
disinterested observer might well deduce is that you're disinclined to
return your trolley and that you have no respect for other people's
property. Which is asking for trouble.

If a parking space is empty, why shouldn't someone park in it?
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
John Mc.
2017-08-05 01:33:24 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by John Mc.
<https://www.craigdacy.com/single-post/2016/09/12/What-Returning-Your-Shopping-Cart-Says-About-You>
"I have a pet peeve. You know when you’re at the grocery store and you see
shopping carts littered around the parking lot? That drives me
insane......"
I feel his pain. My cart goes to the corral mostly. The exception being-
as I've said I park out in BFE. And usually take two spaces. (I've grown
tired of dings and chips because SFB in his POS car just slams his door
into me). Anyway I NEVER do this with a full or nearly full lot. Now if I
walk out to BFE past empty space after empty space only to find SFB parked
right next to me. I will VERY VERY gently put my cart right the ***** up
against his driver's door. Just making a point.
John Mc.
I don't know what point you think you're making, but what a
disinterested observer might well deduce is that you're disinclined to
return your trolley and that you have no respect for other people's
property. Which is asking for trouble.
If a parking space is empty, why shouldn't someone park in it?
In this scenario I've parked OUT far away from the store solely for the
purpose of NOT having my doors dinged by the inconsiderate louts who
fling their doors open with abandon. Granted the space is open but there
are also spaces open across the aisle and down the aisle. Many of them
closer to the store. PICK ONE. My opinion is they basically know what my
purpose is in parking there and are trying to "mark" their territory and
show I can run but I can't hide.

John Mc.
John Mc.
2017-08-05 02:08:09 UTC
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Post by John Mc.
Post by Whiskers
Post by John Mc.
<https://www.craigdacy.com/single-post/2016/09/12/What-Returning-Your-Shopping-Cart-Says-About-You>
"I have a pet peeve. You know when you’re at the grocery store and you see
shopping carts littered around the parking lot? That drives me
insane......"
I feel his pain. My cart goes to the corral mostly. The exception being-
as I've said I park out in BFE. And usually take two spaces. (I've grown
tired of dings and chips because SFB in his POS car just slams his door
into me). Anyway I NEVER do this with a full or nearly full lot. Now if I
walk out to BFE past empty space after empty space only to find SFB parked
right next to me. I will VERY VERY gently put my cart right the ***** up
against his driver's door. Just making a point.
John Mc.
I don't know what point you think you're making, but what a
disinterested observer might well deduce is that you're disinclined to
return your trolley and that you have no respect for other people's
property. Which is asking for trouble.
If a parking space is empty, why shouldn't someone park in it?
In this scenario I've parked OUT far away from the store solely for the
purpose of NOT having my doors dinged by the inconsiderate louts who
fling their doors open with abandon. Granted the space is open but there
are also spaces open across the aisle and down the aisle. Many of them
closer to the store. PICK ONE. My opinion is they basically know what my
purpose is in parking there and are trying to "mark" their territory and
show I can run but I can't hide.
John Mc.
An addendum to the above. I told about this before but. SWMBO and I had
gone to the local Cracker Barrel restaurant for breakfast. They've a
sort of store attached with all sorts of "stuff". Afterward I went to
the truck, put on Sinatra and put my seat back. Nap time-that woman
loves to shop. And I wake up to bang, bang. WTF? (Again, I like to park
in BFE) In this case I'm parked at the far end of the lot and there's a
small space next to me that is NOT for parking as it has diagonal hash
marks and a hydrant next to it. And what had happened was some ignorant
asshat, driving a real piece of sh*t car had decided HE was going to
park there; then found insufficient space for an easy exit and decided
to take it out on my passenger side door. He was almost to the door
before I brought my seat up and exited the truck. And there's this nice
set of dings in my door. SWMBO showed up and asked me about it. I
explained and she asked what I was going to do. She'd brought several
bags out from the store, I'd only brought one thing-a to go cup of diet
coke. SFB's beater car had a driver's window that wasn't rolled up and
cloth seats. OOPPS.

John Mc.
Les Albert
2017-08-05 03:12:54 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by John Mc.
Post by John Mc.
In this scenario I've parked OUT far away from the store solely for the
purpose of NOT having my doors dinged by the inconsiderate louts who
fling their doors open with abandon. Granted the space is open but there
are also spaces open across the aisle and down the aisle. Many of them
closer to the store. PICK ONE. My opinion is they basically know what my
purpose is in parking there and are trying to "mark" their territory and
show I can run but I can't hide.
John Mc.
An addendum to the above. I told about this before but. SWMBO and I had
gone to the local Cracker Barrel restaurant for breakfast. They've a
sort of store attached with all sorts of "stuff". Afterward I went to
the truck, put on Sinatra and put my seat back. Nap time-that woman
loves to shop. And I wake up to bang, bang. WTF? (Again, I like to park
in BFE) In this case I'm parked at the far end of the lot and there's a
small space next to me that is NOT for parking as it has diagonal hash
marks and a hydrant next to it. And what had happened was some ignorant
asshat, driving a real piece of sh*t car had decided HE was going to
park there; then found insufficient space for an easy exit and decided
to take it out on my passenger side door. He was almost to the door
before I brought my seat up and exited the truck. And there's this nice
set of dings in my door. SWMBO showed up and asked me about it. I
explained and she asked what I was going to do. She'd brought several
bags out from the store, I'd only brought one thing-a to go cup of diet
coke. SFB's beater car had a driver's window that wasn't rolled up and
cloth seats. OOPPS.
For a guy who is so attuned to the stupidity of other drivers and how
they park, you are an amateur when it comes to getting even. Diet
Coke spilled on a jerk's car seats is kid stuff. What you want to
keep in the car is this: http://tinyurl.com/ycjfz4rw
It's inexpensive, and it is effective to the point of making some of
those people you use it on want to sell their car. Just a few drops
on the upholstery, or if you can open their hood then paint some on
the exhaust manifold. If you are an Amazon customer then they also
have it as a Prime item shipped from Amazon stock.

Les
B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-08-05 05:23:16 UTC
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On Fri, 04 Aug 2017 22:08:09 -0400, "John Mc."
Post by John Mc.
She'd brought several
bags out from the store, I'd only brought one thing-a to go cup of diet
coke. SFB's beater car had a driver's window that wasn't rolled up and
cloth seats. OOPPS.
You're awfully vindictive, aren't you. I like that in a person.
John Mc.
2017-08-05 08:28:43 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Fri, 04 Aug 2017 22:08:09 -0400, "John Mc."
Post by John Mc.
She'd brought several
bags out from the store, I'd only brought one thing-a to go cup of diet
coke. SFB's beater car had a driver's window that wasn't rolled up and
cloth seats. OOPPS.
You're awfully vindictive, aren't you. I like that in a person.
Everybody needs a hobby.

John Mc.
B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-08-04 18:02:48 UTC
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On Fri, 4 Aug 2017 08:55:19 -0400, John Mc. <***@tdcogre.com>
wrote:>
Post by John Mc.
I feel his pain. My cart goes to the corral mostly. The exception being-
as I've said I park out in BFE. And usually take two spaces. (I've grown
tired of dings and chips because SFB in his POS car just slams his door
into me). Anyway I NEVER do this with a full or nearly full lot. Now if I
walk out to BFE past empty space after empty space only to find SFB parked
right next to me. I will VERY VERY gently put my cart right the ***** up
against his driver's door. Just making a point.
You are entirely justified in doing so.
--
"... leaving aside the question of whether Beethoven should
*ever* be played with vibrato." — Larry Lesser
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