Discussion:
Wi-Fi
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Charles Bishop
2017-07-03 17:46:55 UTC
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There was a time, when WiFi first came out that people didn't like the
name, don't know why. Too close to HiFi for stereo recording, maybe.

Anyway, I have a router, and it supplies WiFi. There is a green light
that is on that indicates, I think, that "wireless" is functioning.
Except that now, every time I get on the computer, there is a window
asking me to pick my wifi source, and then give my password to connect.
I did this a couple of times, but it keeps asking.

Shouldn't once I "connect" to wifi, it stay on? Admittedly, the light
next to "wireless" doesn't glow as brightly as the other indicator
lights. I thought this might mean something.

Any thoughts?
--
charles
Tim Wright
2017-07-03 18:25:53 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
There was a time, when WiFi first came out that people didn't like the
name, don't know why. Too close to HiFi for stereo recording, maybe.
Anyway, I have a router, and it supplies WiFi. There is a green light
that is on that indicates, I think, that "wireless" is functioning.
Except that now, every time I get on the computer, there is a window
asking me to pick my wifi source, and then give my password to connect.
I did this a couple of times, but it keeps asking.
Shouldn't once I "connect" to wifi, it stay on? Admittedly, the light
next to "wireless" doesn't glow as brightly as the other indicator
lights. I thought this might mean something.
Any thoughts?
On my computer when I select a WiFi source it gives me the option to
"connect automatically", or words to that effect. Does yours do that
and have you selected that option?
--
Studies have shown that the people of Dubai don't understand the humor
of the Flintstones, but the people of Abu Dhabi do.

Tim W
Charles Bishop
2017-07-06 19:19:43 UTC
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Post by Tim Wright
Post by Charles Bishop
There was a time, when WiFi first came out that people didn't like the
name, don't know why. Too close to HiFi for stereo recording, maybe.
Anyway, I have a router, and it supplies WiFi. There is a green light
that is on that indicates, I think, that "wireless" is functioning.
Except that now, every time I get on the computer, there is a window
asking me to pick my wifi source, and then give my password to connect.
I did this a couple of times, but it keeps asking.
Shouldn't once I "connect" to wifi, it stay on? Admittedly, the light
next to "wireless" doesn't glow as brightly as the other indicator
lights. I thought this might mean something.
Any thoughts?
On my computer when I select a WiFi source it gives me the option to
"connect automatically", or words to that effect. Does yours do that
and have you selected that option?
Yes, but the problem now becomes the WiFi won't accept the password,
where before it did. I may have to check my records to see if I've made
an error somewhere.
--
charles
Tim Wright
2017-07-06 19:47:14 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Tim Wright
Post by Charles Bishop
There was a time, when WiFi first came out that people didn't like the
name, don't know why. Too close to HiFi for stereo recording, maybe.
Anyway, I have a router, and it supplies WiFi. There is a green light
that is on that indicates, I think, that "wireless" is functioning.
Except that now, every time I get on the computer, there is a window
asking me to pick my wifi source, and then give my password to connect.
I did this a couple of times, but it keeps asking.
Shouldn't once I "connect" to wifi, it stay on? Admittedly, the light
next to "wireless" doesn't glow as brightly as the other indicator
lights. I thought this might mean something.
Any thoughts?
On my computer when I select a WiFi source it gives me the option to
"connect automatically", or words to that effect. Does yours do that
and have you selected that option?
Yes, but the problem now becomes the WiFi won't accept the password,
where before it did. I may have to check my records to see if I've made
an error somewhere.
Often times the WiFi password is on a label on the back/bottom of the
router. At least the factory password is. Even if you've changed it
you may still be able to gain access with the factory name and pwd.
--
Studies have shown that the people of Dubai don't understand the humor
of the Flintstones, but the people of Abu Dhabi do.

Tim W
Greg Goss
2017-07-09 20:24:36 UTC
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Post by Tim Wright
Often times the WiFi password is on a label on the back/bottom of the
router. At least the factory password is. Even if you've changed it
you may still be able to gain access with the factory name and pwd.
For a while there network cards and routers made a big deal about
"press the button at about the same time" to set the connection. All
the routers still have the curved-arrow set-the-connection button.

I used to know where to find it in Windows. I'm sure it's still
somewhere, but Windows keeps moving stuff like that around. If you
can find the equivalent of "press this button" that might be easier
than guessing a password.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Greg Goss
2017-07-04 08:22:04 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
There was a time, when WiFi first came out that people didn't like the
name, don't know why. Too close to HiFi for stereo recording, maybe.
Anyway, I have a router, and it supplies WiFi. There is a green light
that is on that indicates, I think, that "wireless" is functioning.
Except that now, every time I get on the computer, there is a window
asking me to pick my wifi source, and then give my password to connect.
I did this a couple of times, but it keeps asking.
Shouldn't once I "connect" to wifi, it stay on? Admittedly, the light
next to "wireless" doesn't glow as brightly as the other indicator
lights. I thought this might mean something.
My Telus-supplied ADSL modem and WiFi router box got weaker and weaker
with the WiFi signal. Eventually I picked up a generic WiFi router
from Kijiji and wired it to the still-strong ethernet link on the
router/modem.

So there's at least one brand of modem/router out there that gets
weaker over time.

I'm on vacation at the moment, staying in an AirBnB (without the nB).
My computer refuses to connect to it. So I'm using a "wired tether"
from my phone (after carefully checking that my 4G connection was
turned off). But of the four cables packed or laying around in my
car, one is charge-only, no data, two seem completely dead, and the
fourth is really flakey. ("Help me, one last cable. You're my only
hope.") I find it weird that the phone was willing to connect to the
WiFi, but the computer just keeps running dots across the window under
"obtaining network requirements" or some such and never asks for a
password. The computer is 2013 or so and the phone is 2015, so
perhaps the modem has turned off older protocols?)
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Charles Bishop
2017-07-06 19:15:23 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Charles Bishop
There was a time, when WiFi first came out that people didn't like the
name, don't know why. Too close to HiFi for stereo recording, maybe.
Anyway, I have a router, and it supplies WiFi. There is a green light
that is on that indicates, I think, that "wireless" is functioning.
Except that now, every time I get on the computer, there is a window
asking me to pick my wifi source, and then give my password to connect.
I did this a couple of times, but it keeps asking.
Shouldn't once I "connect" to wifi, it stay on? Admittedly, the light
next to "wireless" doesn't glow as brightly as the other indicator
lights. I thought this might mean something.
My Telus-supplied ADSL modem and WiFi router box got weaker and weaker
with the WiFi signal. Eventually I picked up a generic WiFi router
from Kijiji and wired it to the still-strong ethernet link on the
router/modem.
So there's at least one brand of modem/router out there that gets
weaker over time.
I'm on vacation at the moment, staying in an AirBnB (without the nB).
My computer refuses to connect to it. So I'm using a "wired tether"
from my phone (after carefully checking that my 4G connection was
turned off). But of the four cables packed or laying around in my
car, one is charge-only, no data, two seem completely dead, and the
fourth is really flakey. ("Help me, one last cable. You're my only
hope.") I find it weird that the phone was willing to connect to the
WiFi, but the computer just keeps running dots across the window under
"obtaining network requirements" or some such and never asks for a
password. The computer is 2013 or so and the phone is 2015, so
perhaps the modem has turned off older protocols?)
Doesn't seem to help me, but it's nice to know others have problems as
well. As I recall you're geeky enough to figure this stuff out.
--
charoles
Peter Boulding
2017-07-04 15:13:23 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
There was a time, when WiFi first came out that people didn't like the
name, don't know why. Too close to HiFi for stereo recording, maybe.
The phrase "Wi-Fi" was coined by a marketing firm on behalf of a group of
companies that wanted to promote IEEE 802.11b. It's no coincidence that it
rhymes with Sci-Fi and Hi-Fi, but the firm made no attempt to justify the
"Fi" bit.

The group was later to use the slogan "The Standard for Wireless Fidelity"
but, as the relevant Wikipedia article comments, that's a nonsense slogan.
Post by Charles Bishop
Anyway, I have a router, and it supplies WiFi. There is a green light
that is on that indicates, I think, that "wireless" is functioning.
Except that now, every time I get on the computer, there is a window
asking me to pick my wifi source, and then give my password to connect.
I did this a couple of times, but it keeps asking.
Shouldn't once I "connect" to wifi, it stay on? Admittedly, the light
next to "wireless" doesn't glow as brightly as the other indicator
lights. I thought this might mean something.
Any thoughts?
The "doesn't glow as brightly" bit is unlikely to be significant. I would
have expected the relevant light to come on as soon as Wi-Fi is enabled in
the router interface, and stay on -- perhaps flickering to indicate actual
sending/receiving. But I would expect it to be lit regardless of whether any
device is currently connected wirelessly to the router.

Whenever you boot the relevant computer it has to connect to the router's
Wi-Fi, and it appears that the said computer no longer knows that your
router is the preferred device. As Tim said, look on the computer for a
"connect automatically" setting. In Win 7, at least, you can easily get at
the relevant dialog by right-clicking on the relevant Wi-Fi router in the
displayed list you mentioned and selecting "Properties".

Oh -- one other thing: the router's aerial may have a tightening ring or
tightenable socket where it joins the body of the router. Make sure it
hasn't become loose, as this can degrade the signal strength.
--
Regards, Peter Boulding
***@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk (to e-mail, remove "UNSPAM")
Fractal Images and Music: http://www.pboulding.co.uk/
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=794240&content=music
Charles Bishop
2017-07-06 19:13:47 UTC
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Post by Peter Boulding
Post by Charles Bishop
There was a time, when WiFi first came out that people didn't like the
name, don't know why. Too close to HiFi for stereo recording, maybe.
The phrase "Wi-Fi" was coined by a marketing firm on behalf of a group of
companies that wanted to promote IEEE 802.11b. It's no coincidence that it
rhymes with Sci-Fi and Hi-Fi, but the firm made no attempt to justify the
"Fi" bit.
The group was later to use the slogan "The Standard for Wireless Fidelity"
but, as the relevant Wikipedia article comments, that's a nonsense slogan.
Post by Charles Bishop
Anyway, I have a router, and it supplies WiFi. There is a green light
that is on that indicates, I think, that "wireless" is functioning.
Except that now, every time I get on the computer, there is a window
asking me to pick my wifi source, and then give my password to connect.
I did this a couple of times, but it keeps asking.
Shouldn't once I "connect" to wifi, it stay on? Admittedly, the light
next to "wireless" doesn't glow as brightly as the other indicator
lights. I thought this might mean something.
Any thoughts?
The "doesn't glow as brightly" bit is unlikely to be significant. I would
have expected the relevant light to come on as soon as Wi-Fi is enabled in
the router interface, and stay on -- perhaps flickering to indicate actual
sending/receiving. But I would expect it to be lit regardless of whether any
device is currently connected wirelessly to the router.
Ok, so low light is not a problem. The light does flicker, but as far as
I know, no WiFi is being used since I have a hard connection to the
router.
Post by Peter Boulding
Whenever you boot the relevant computer it has to connect to the router's
Wi-Fi, and it appears that the said computer no longer knows that your
router is the preferred device. As Tim said, look on the computer for a
"connect automatically" setting. In Win 7, at least, you can easily get at
the relevant dialog by right-clicking on the relevant Wi-Fi router in the
displayed list you mentioned and selecting "Properties".
Apple iMac. and I don't think I have a mouse with right-click.

Once I select the correct router id from a list, and put in my password,
I have WiFi. However, on another session at the computer, the router
asks me to repeat getting connected to WiFi.
Post by Peter Boulding
Oh -- one other thing: the router's aerial may have a tightening ring or
tightenable socket where it joins the body of the router. Make sure it
hasn't become loose, as this can degrade the signal strength.
I'll check the other stuff, but this router doesn't have an aerial that
is external to the router. There is only output cable to the computer,
phone line connection, and power.

Thanks

Charles
Peter Boulding
2017-07-06 19:59:41 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
I'll check the other stuff, but this router doesn't have an aerial that
is external to the router. There is only output cable to the computer,
phone line connection, and power.
We may have a misunderstanding here.

If the relevant computer is *cable*-connected to the router, then you
won't--or shouldn't--be using its Wi-Fi capabilities. I would expect (based
on Windows; I have no experience of Macs) to find separate settings for the
cable connection.
--
Regards, Peter Boulding
***@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk (to e-mail, remove "UNSPAM")
Fractal Images and Music: http://www.pboulding.co.uk/
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=794240&content=music
Charles Bishop
2017-07-11 17:56:53 UTC
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Post by Peter Boulding
Post by Charles Bishop
I'll check the other stuff, but this router doesn't have an aerial that
is external to the router. There is only output cable to the computer,
phone line connection, and power.
We may have a misunderstanding here.
If the relevant computer is *cable*-connected to the router, then you
won't--or shouldn't--be using its Wi-Fi capabilities. I would expect (based
on Windows; I have no experience of Macs) to find separate settings for the
cable connection.
That's true, but there can be other devices to use the WiFi-iPads and
the like. Since I don't have one, I don't need the WiFi.

However, I became confused since as far as I knew, the WiFi worked (even
though unneeded) and now it doesn't. The reason I think this is true is
that if I turn WiFi on, I

1) would enter the password and the WiFi would be on. Then, some time
later, it would behave as if I hadn't enable it, and ask to be
"reconnected" - enter the password once again. I didn't understand what
would "turn it off" where I would need to reset it.

Now it

2) won't accept the password that it used to and it won't even turn on.

The solution now is to turn it off, but in case I need it in the future,
I'm trying to solve it now.

I've been away, and will try the suggestions given and report back.
--
charles
Tim Wright
2017-07-11 19:21:42 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Boulding
Post by Charles Bishop
I'll check the other stuff, but this router doesn't have an aerial that
is external to the router. There is only output cable to the computer,
phone line connection, and power.
We may have a misunderstanding here.
If the relevant computer is *cable*-connected to the router, then you
won't--or shouldn't--be using its Wi-Fi capabilities. I would expect (based
on Windows; I have no experience of Macs) to find separate settings for the
cable connection.
That's true, but there can be other devices to use the WiFi-iPads and
the like. Since I don't have one, I don't need the WiFi.
However, I became confused since as far as I knew, the WiFi worked (even
though unneeded) and now it doesn't. The reason I think this is true is
that if I turn WiFi on, I
1) would enter the password and the WiFi would be on. Then, some time
later, it would behave as if I hadn't enable it, and ask to be
"reconnected" - enter the password once again. I didn't understand what
would "turn it off" where I would need to reset it.
Now it
2) won't accept the password that it used to and it won't even turn on.
The solution now is to turn it off, but in case I need it in the future,
I'm trying to solve it now.
I've been away, and will try the suggestions given and report back.
Typically there will be a reset button on the back of the router to
reset everything to factory settings. Often this is a pinhole reset
button which means you'll need a straightened out paper clip to insert
into the pinhole to push the enclosed button.
--
Studies have shown that the people of Dubai don't understand the humor
of the Flintstones, but the people of Abu Dhabi do.

Tim W
Greg Goss
2017-07-12 15:07:21 UTC
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Post by Tim Wright
Typically there will be a reset button on the back of the router to
reset everything to factory settings. Often this is a pinhole reset
button which means you'll need a straightened out paper clip to insert
into the pinhole to push the enclosed button.
Sometimes you press and hold for fifteen or twenty seconds.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
bill van
2017-07-06 22:33:03 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Boulding
Whenever you boot the relevant computer it has to connect to the router's
Wi-Fi, and it appears that the said computer no longer knows that your
router is the preferred device. As Tim said, look on the computer for a
"connect automatically" setting. In Win 7, at least, you can easily get at
the relevant dialog by right-clicking on the relevant Wi-Fi router in the
displayed list you mentioned and selecting "Properties".
Apple iMac. and I don't think I have a mouse with right-click.
On a Mac, control-click will get you the same thing: a menu of
commands you can execute in relation to whatever you're clicking on.
--
bill
Greg Goss
2017-07-10 03:21:13 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Boulding
router is the preferred device. As Tim said, look on the computer for a
"connect automatically" setting. In Win 7, at least, you can easily get at
the relevant dialog by right-clicking on the relevant Wi-Fi router in the
displayed list you mentioned and selecting "Properties".
Apple iMac. and I don't think I have a mouse with right-click.
A cheap $5 mouse can be plugged into an Apple, and if you do, I've
been told right-click does what it should. Someone else in the thread
has already told you what keyboard alt to press to get the equivalent
"what can I do with this thing" menu.

Android treats long-press (sometimes) as a right-click. Does a long
click do anything in Apples?
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
bill van
2017-07-10 05:16:14 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Boulding
router is the preferred device. As Tim said, look on the computer for a
"connect automatically" setting. In Win 7, at least, you can easily get at
the relevant dialog by right-clicking on the relevant Wi-Fi router in the
displayed list you mentioned and selecting "Properties".
Apple iMac. and I don't think I have a mouse with right-click.
A cheap $5 mouse can be plugged into an Apple, and if you do, I've
been told right-click does what it should. Someone else in the thread
has already told you what keyboard alt to press to get the equivalent
"what can I do with this thing" menu.
Android treats long-press (sometimes) as a right-click. Does a long
click do anything in Apples?
A long click doesn't do anything in the Mac OS, and in 20-some years
of using Macs I haven't encountered a Mac app in which it did
anything. But I'm no Mac software expert.
--
bill
Questor
2017-07-10 17:54:35 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Boulding
router is the preferred device. As Tim said, look on the computer for a
"connect automatically" setting. In Win 7, at least, you can easily get at
the relevant dialog by right-clicking on the relevant Wi-Fi router in the
displayed list you mentioned and selecting "Properties".
Apple iMac. and I don't think I have a mouse with right-click.
A cheap $5 mouse can be plugged into an Apple, and if you do, I've
been told right-click does what it should. Someone else in the thread
has already told you what keyboard alt to press to get the equivalent
"what can I do with this thing" menu.
Android treats long-press (sometimes) as a right-click. Does a long
click do anything in Apples?
A long click doesn't do anything in the Mac OS,
Past a certain duration, a "long click" is going to appear as a "drag"
operation. (As in, "drag and drop.")
bill van
2017-07-10 18:55:21 UTC
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Post by Questor
Post by bill van
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Boulding
router is the preferred device. As Tim said, look on the computer for a
"connect automatically" setting. In Win 7, at least, you can easily get at
the relevant dialog by right-clicking on the relevant Wi-Fi router in the
displayed list you mentioned and selecting "Properties".
Apple iMac. and I don't think I have a mouse with right-click.
A cheap $5 mouse can be plugged into an Apple, and if you do, I've
been told right-click does what it should. Someone else in the thread
has already told you what keyboard alt to press to get the equivalent
"what can I do with this thing" menu.
Android treats long-press (sometimes) as a right-click. Does a long
click do anything in Apples?
A long click doesn't do anything in the Mac OS,
Past a certain duration, a "long click" is going to appear as a "drag"
operation. (As in, "drag and drop.")
I'm not seeing that. If you're over a folder or a document, any click,
long or short, will let you drag it. If you're on the desktop, a long
or short click will appear to create a transparent box, but it
disappears as soon as you let go. So I'm not sure what you're
referring to.
--
bill
Questor
2017-07-12 15:13:14 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Questor
Post by bill van
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Peter Boulding
router is the preferred device. As Tim said, look on the computer for a
"connect automatically" setting. In Win 7, at least, you can easily get at
the relevant dialog by right-clicking on the relevant Wi-Fi router in the
displayed list you mentioned and selecting "Properties".
Apple iMac. and I don't think I have a mouse with right-click.
A cheap $5 mouse can be plugged into an Apple, and if you do, I've
been told right-click does what it should. Someone else in the thread
has already told you what keyboard alt to press to get the equivalent
"what can I do with this thing" menu.
Android treats long-press (sometimes) as a right-click. Does a long
click do anything in Apples?
A long click doesn't do anything in the Mac OS,
Past a certain duration, a "long click" is going to appear as a "drag"
operation. (As in, "drag and drop.")
I'm not seeing that. If you're over a folder or a document, any click,
long or short, will let you drag it. If you're on the desktop, a long
or short click will appear to create a transparent box, but it
disappears as soon as you let go. So I'm not sure what you're
referring to.
That is the "selection rectangle," which one *drags* over a group of items in
order to select them all for some subsequent group operation. My point was that
attempting to extend the desktop GUI interface with a "long click" is going to
get confused with dragging. Dunno how Android handles it.

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