Discussion:
Watergate
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Howard
2017-07-05 18:24:02 UTC
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I started reading part of Katherine Graham's autobiography and I was
interested to read about how Nixon attacked the Washington Post.

The attacks started well before Watergate. They included little things,
such as a supposed reader letter writing campaign with letters taking
the form of "I'm not a Nixon supporter but..." In 1970, Nixon directly
ordered his staff to refuse to talk to anyone from the Post, even one
reporter who with a reputation for writing some favorable pieces.

Bob Dole twice attacked the Post before the 1972 election for being
liberal elitists openly pulling for McGovern. Graham describes meeting
Dole later and basically asking him WTF, and he responds that he doesn't
read the speeches he's told to deliver.

The big threat though was the Nixon administration orchestrating
challenges to the FCC licenses of local TV stations owned by the Post.
The challenges drove down the price of the Post's stock by half. Nixon
also tried to engineer a hostile takeover of the Post by
archconservative billionaire Richard Scaife, and Graham was warned by a
banker with Nixon ties that he had heard she shouldn't go out alone if
she knew what was good for her.

There are some parallels to Trump, included Nixon's longstanding wounded
whining attitude which he used to justify anything he did as reasonable
payback. But one big difference is that Watergate had little press
attention outside of the Post until Walter Cronkite covered it in depth
several months later, and coverage by other outlets remained sketchy
until March 1973. Trump must wish he had such breathing room, although
he's done all he can to get any breathing room.
Boron Elgar
2017-07-05 22:25:47 UTC
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On Wed, 5 Jul 2017 18:24:02 +0000 (UTC), Howard
Post by Howard
I started reading part of Katherine Graham's autobiography and I was
interested to read about how Nixon attacked the Washington Post.
The attacks started well before Watergate. They included little things,
such as a supposed reader letter writing campaign with letters taking
the form of "I'm not a Nixon supporter but..." In 1970, Nixon directly
ordered his staff to refuse to talk to anyone from the Post, even one
reporter who with a reputation for writing some favorable pieces.
Bob Dole twice attacked the Post before the 1972 election for being
liberal elitists openly pulling for McGovern. Graham describes meeting
Dole later and basically asking him WTF, and he responds that he doesn't
read the speeches he's told to deliver.
The big threat though was the Nixon administration orchestrating
challenges to the FCC licenses of local TV stations owned by the Post.
The challenges drove down the price of the Post's stock by half. Nixon
also tried to engineer a hostile takeover of the Post by
archconservative billionaire Richard Scaife, and Graham was warned by a
banker with Nixon ties that he had heard she shouldn't go out alone if
she knew what was good for her.
There are some parallels to Trump, included Nixon's longstanding wounded
whining attitude which he used to justify anything he did as reasonable
payback. But one big difference is that Watergate had little press
attention outside of the Post until Walter Cronkite covered it in depth
several months later, and coverage by other outlets remained sketchy
until March 1973. Trump must wish he had such breathing room, although
he's done all he can to get any breathing room.
One word - Internet.
Howard
2017-07-06 01:02:29 UTC
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Post by Boron Elgar
On Wed, 5 Jul 2017 18:24:02 +0000 (UTC), Howard
Post by Howard
There are some parallels to Trump, included Nixon's longstanding
wounded whining attitude which he used to justify anything he did
as reasonable payback. But one big difference is that Watergate
had little press attention outside of the Post until Walter
Cronkite covered it in depth several months later, and coverage
by other outlets remained sketchy until March 1973. Trump must
wish he had such breathing room, although he's done all he can
to get any breathing room.
One word - Internet.
If only Nixon could have been able to drunk tweet his conspiracy theories
about Jews to the world instead of just screaming them at Haldeman and
Ehrlichman in the privacy of the Oval Office, he would have resigned a lot
sooner.
B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-07-06 01:33:36 UTC
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On Thu, 6 Jul 2017 01:02:29 +0000 (UTC), Howard
Post by Howard
Haldeman and
Ehrlichman
What (besides the obvious) do they have in common.
a***@yahoo.com
2017-07-07 19:11:28 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Thu, 6 Jul 2017 01:02:29 +0000 (UTC), Howard
Post by Howard
Haldeman and
Ehrlichman
What (besides the obvious) do they have in common.
Man, I have no idea.
B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-07-07 19:46:37 UTC
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Post by a***@yahoo.com
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Thu, 6 Jul 2017 01:02:29 +0000 (UTC), Howard
Post by Howard
Haldeman and
Ehrlichman
What (besides the obvious) do they have in common.
Man, I have no idea.
Name three famous "christian" "scientists": Mary Baker Eddy, ...,
...
a***@yahoo.com
2017-07-07 21:20:08 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Thu, 6 Jul 2017 01:02:29 +0000 (UTC), Howard
Post by Howard
Haldeman and
Ehrlichman
What (besides the obvious) do they have in common.
Man, I have no idea.
Name three famous "christian" "scientists": Mary Baker Eddy, ...,
...
I was referring to their last names....
bill van
2017-07-07 22:54:30 UTC
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Post by a***@yahoo.com
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Thu, 6 Jul 2017 01:02:29 +0000 (UTC), Howard
Post by Howard
Haldeman and
Ehrlichman
What (besides the obvious) do they have in common.
Man, I have no idea.
Name three famous "christian" "scientists": Mary Baker Eddy, ...,
...
I was referring to their last names....
Oh, alright then. Mary Baker Eddyman.
--
bill
Snidely
2017-07-08 07:23:42 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Thu, 6 Jul 2017 01:02:29 +0000 (UTC), Howard
Post by Howard
Haldeman and
Ehrlichman
What (besides the obvious) do they have in common.
Man, I have no idea.
Name three famous "christian" "scientists": Mary Baker Eddy, ...,
...
I was referring to their last names....
Oh, alright then. Mary Baker Eddyman.
You've got his ideé fixe'd, do you?

/dps
--
Rule #0: Don't be on fire.
In case of fire, exit the building before tweeting about it.
(Sighting reported by Adam F)
Boron
2017-07-06 15:43:43 UTC
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On Thu, 6 Jul 2017 01:02:29 +0000 (UTC), Howard
Post by Howard
Post by Boron Elgar
On Wed, 5 Jul 2017 18:24:02 +0000 (UTC), Howard
Post by Howard
There are some parallels to Trump, included Nixon's longstanding
wounded whining attitude which he used to justify anything he did
as reasonable payback. But one big difference is that Watergate
had little press attention outside of the Post until Walter
Cronkite covered it in depth several months later, and coverage
by other outlets remained sketchy until March 1973. Trump must
wish he had such breathing room, although he's done all he can
to get any breathing room.
One word - Internet.
If only Nixon could have been able to drunk tweet his conspiracy theories
about Jews to the world instead of just screaming them at Haldeman and
Ehrlichman in the privacy of the Oval Office, he would have resigned a lot
sooner.
http://www.nytimes.com/1976/03/29/archives/nixon-on-his-knees.html
In the small Lincoln sitting room, alone with Henry Kissinger, the
embattled President is reported to have said: “Henry, you are not a
very orthodox Jew, and I am not an orthodox Quaker, but we need to
pray.” And then, according to this report, “Nixon got down on his
knees. Kissinger felt he had no alternative but to kneel down, too.”
Les Albert
2017-07-06 15:52:17 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Thu, 6 Jul 2017 01:02:29 +0000 (UTC), Howard
Post by Howard
Post by Boron Elgar
On Wed, 5 Jul 2017 18:24:02 +0000 (UTC), Howard
Post by Howard
There are some parallels to Trump, included Nixon's longstanding
wounded whining attitude which he used to justify anything he did
as reasonable payback. But one big difference is that Watergate
had little press attention outside of the Post until Walter
Cronkite covered it in depth several months later, and coverage
by other outlets remained sketchy until March 1973. Trump must
wish he had such breathing room, although he's done all he can
to get any breathing room.
One word - Internet.
If only Nixon could have been able to drunk tweet his conspiracy theories
about Jews to the world instead of just screaming them at Haldeman and
Ehrlichman in the privacy of the Oval Office, he would have resigned a lot
sooner.
http://www.nytimes.com/1976/03/29/archives/nixon-on-his-knees.html
In the small Lincoln sitting room, alone with Henry Kissinger, the
embattled President is reported to have said: “Henry, you are not a
very orthodox Jew, and I am not an orthodox Quaker, but we need to
pray.” And then, according to this report, “Nixon got down on his
knees. Kissinger felt he had no alternative but to kneel down, too.”
It didn't work.

Les
Howard
2017-07-06 17:36:41 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
On Thu, 6 Jul 2017 01:02:29 +0000 (UTC), Howard
Post by Howard
If only Nixon could have been able to drunk tweet his conspiracy
theories about Jews to the world instead of just screaming them at
Haldeman and Ehrlichman in the privacy of the Oval Office, he would
have resigned a lot sooner.
http://www.nytimes.com/1976/03/29/archives/nixon-on-his-knees.html
In the small Lincoln sitting room, alone with Henry Kissinger, the
embattled President is reported to have said: “Henry, you are not a
very orthodox Jew, and I am not an orthodox Quaker, but we need to
pray.” And then, according to this report, “Nixon got down on his
knees. Kissinger felt he had no alternative but to kneel down, too.”
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/daily/oct99/nixon6.htm

In many cases, Nixon's tirades were touched off by news leaks
and political setbacks, such as the occasion at the beginning
of July 1971 when the Bureau of Labor Statistics released
figures showing that unemployment was on the upswing. Concerned
that news of the joblessness was hurting him in the polls,
Nixon demanded the ouster of the director of the bureau,
Julius Shiskin, and asked his hatchet man, Charles Colson, to
investigate the ethnic background of officials in the agency.

"They are all Jews?" Nixon exclaimed when Colson listed the
names.

"Every one of them," Colson replied. "Well, with a couple of
exceptions. . . . You just have to go down the goddamn list
and you know they are out to kill us."

Charming relevant paranoid audio here:

https://www.nixonlibrary.gov/themuseum/exhibits/2010/watergateexhibitbac
kground/WG_resources/Tape/536-16%20Malek%20is%20not%20Jewish_Jews%20in%
20Government.mp3

http://tinyurl.com/ycacyeew

Big time GOP operative and current Trump supporter Fred Malek led the
effort to name and punish Jews in the Department of Labor. Malek long
lied about his role and remains a major player in Republican politics.

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/chatterbox/2007/09/nixon
s_jew_count_the_whole_story.html

http://tinyurl.com/8993ktc
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