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Windows 10 slightly more popular than Windows XP curently
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B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-07-25 06:16:28 UTC
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http://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-only-slightly-more-popular-than-windows-xp-among-firms/

http://tinyurl.com/y9o3whse
Peter Boulding
2017-07-25 09:31:55 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
http://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-only-slightly-more-popular-than-windows-xp-among-firms/
http://tinyurl.com/y9o3whse
I object strongly to the use of the word "popular" given that Microsoft have
been allowed to---and do---make it damnably difficult to acquire a PC loaded
with any version of Windows other than 10.

Note, BTW, that the MSM's near-universal assumption that the majority of
systems affected by Wannacry and similar ransomware were running XP was wide
of the mark: in fact the majority of affected systems were running Windows
7.

Since they lacked the relevant patch, these systems must have had
auto-updating switched off---probably because their owners had done so for
fear of being auto-"upgraded" to Windows 10.
--
Regards, Peter Boulding
***@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk (to e-mail, remove "UNSPAM")
Fractal Images and Music: http://www.pboulding.co.uk/
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Richard Hershberger
2017-07-25 13:25:17 UTC
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Post by Peter Boulding
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
http://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-only-slightly-more-popular-than-windows-xp-among-firms/
http://tinyurl.com/y9o3whse
I object strongly to the use of the word "popular" given that Microsoft have
been allowed to---and do---make it damnably difficult to acquire a PC loaded
with any version of Windows other than 10.
Note, BTW, that the MSM's near-universal assumption that the majority of
systems affected by Wannacry and similar ransomware were running XP was wide
of the mark: in fact the majority of affected systems were running Windows
7.
Since they lacked the relevant patch, these systems must have had
auto-updating switched off---probably because their owners had done so for
fear of being auto-"upgraded" to Windows 10.
I loath Windows 10. I bought a laptop a couple of years ago with it loaded, and have regretted it ever since. At least at first I could turn Cortana mostly off. A subsequent downgrade removed that option. Now there is a penalty for inadvertently letting the cursor stray into that part of the screen, where Cortana pops up and I have to wait for it to go away. This is a pure "fuck you" from Microsoft.

The stuff I want to do on my laptop is all pretty basic. There is no good reason I couldn't do it on XP. Windows 10 is based on the principle that I should be using my computer for the stuff that Microsoft wants me to, so everything is designed to push that. I am coming around to the idea that my next computer will run Linux. I am not a computer geek and don't really want the hassle of a non-standard system, but I gather that there are versions nowadays that are pretty hassle-free.

My desktop at home runs Windows 7. I steadfastly refused the offer of a free downgrade to Windows 10, but one slipped through in a moment of inattention. Fortunately there was the final step of clicking to accept Microsoft's terms of service. Hell, no! That reverted the system back to 7.

Richard R. Hershberger
Snidely
2017-07-26 07:07:22 UTC
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Post by Richard Hershberger
Post by Peter Boulding
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
http://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-only-slightly-more-popular-than-windows-xp-among-firms/
http://tinyurl.com/y9o3whse
I object strongly to the use of the word "popular" given that Microsoft have
been allowed to---and do---make it damnably difficult to acquire a PC loaded
with any version of Windows other than 10.
Note, BTW, that the MSM's near-universal assumption that the majority of
systems affected by Wannacry and similar ransomware were running XP was wide
of the mark: in fact the majority of affected systems were running Windows
7.
Since they lacked the relevant patch, these systems must have had
auto-updating switched off---probably because their owners had done so for
fear of being auto-"upgraded" to Windows 10.
I loath Windows 10. I bought a laptop a couple of years ago with it loaded,
and have regretted it ever since. At least at first I could turn Cortana
mostly off. A subsequent downgrade removed that option. Now there is a
penalty for inadvertently letting the cursor stray into that part of the
screen, where Cortana pops up and I have to wait for it to go away. This is
a pure "fuck you" from Microsoft.
I run W10 at home and at work, can't tell Cortana is there, and I'm
very happy with it. The one flaw that I grouse about, and not often,
is that it seems to have forgotten how to talk to my Pocket Instamatic,
er, older digital point-and-shoot camera.
Post by Richard Hershberger
The stuff I want to do on my laptop is all pretty basic. There is no good
reason I couldn't do it on XP.
Which would be fine, if you weren't on the internet. There comes a
time when applying fixes to XP's security problems is putting band-aids
on band-aids, and those who understand its insides are either long
since transferred, promoted, retired, or dead.
Post by Richard Hershberger
Windows 10 is based on the principle that I
should be using my computer for the stuff that Microsoft wants me to, so
everything is designed to push that. I am coming around to the idea that my
next computer will run Linux. I am not a computer geek and don't really want
the hassle of a non-standard system, but I gather that there are versions
nowadays that are pretty hassle-free.
I think that you want the Mint variety, but I haven't actually tried
it. I've used Fedora, Centos, and Ubuntu without too much hassle,
though. The biggest challenge is setting up CUPS to use a printer, and
I'm batting 666 on that. But I plead guilty to also having used Xenix
286, System V, 4.2 BSD, and that wierd blend Sun ran on the 386
workstations; what I say may not reflect anything you consider reality.
One of my machines has a version of Gnome (an old version, true) that
does irritate me because ALT-TAB doesn't cycle through *windows*, it
cycles through *groups* of windows, and when I tab to "terminal", it
generally doesn't put on top the terminal window I was hoping for.
Post by Richard Hershberger
My desktop at home runs Windows 7. I steadfastly refused the offer of a free
downgrade to Windows 10, but one slipped through in a moment of inattention.
Fortunately there was the final step of clicking to accept Microsoft's terms
of service. Hell, no! That reverted the system back to 7.
Your stone knives should be back from washing at the river bank soon,
too, along with freshly beaten trews.

Dave "no sympathy"
/dps
--
Killing a mouse was hardly a Nobel Prize-worthy exercise, and Lawrence
went apopleptic when he learned a lousy rodent had peed away all his
precious heavy water.
_The Disappearing Spoon_, Sam Kean
HVS
2017-07-26 10:37:05 UTC
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-snip-
Post by Snidely
Post by Richard Hershberger
Windows 10 is based on the principle that I
should be using my computer for the stuff that Microsoft wants me to,
so everything is designed to push that. I am coming around to the idea
that my next computer will run Linux. I am not a computer geek and
don't really want the hassle of a non-standard system, but I gather
that there are versions nowadays that are pretty hassle-free.
I think that you want the Mint variety, but I haven't actually tried
it. I've used Fedora, Centos, and Ubuntu without too much hassle,
though. The biggest challenge is setting up CUPS to use a printer, and
I'm batting 666 on that. But I plead guilty to also having used Xenix
286, System V, 4.2 BSD, and that wierd blend Sun ran on the 386
workstations; what I say may not reflect anything you consider reality.
One of my machines has a version of Gnome (an old version, true) that
does irritate me because ALT-TAB doesn't cycle through *windows*, it
cycles through *groups* of windows, and when I tab to "terminal", it
generally doesn't put on top the terminal window I was hoping for.
Y'see, this answer illustrates a core problem: for anyone who's not
comfortable with, or interested in, things like multiple OS interations and
command lines, the second two-thirds of your answer looks like English, but
may as well be Swahili.

Over the years - every time since Windows95 that I've had to transfer to a
new OS - I've tried out various flavours of Linux, especially when a new
"ready-for-the-consumer-desktop-and-not-just-for-geeks" UI is being touted
around.

In each case I've ultimately given up when basic stuff like printers,
internet connections, software installation, and replacement software
packages proved tricky to configure or to replace. After spending an
afternoon or two trying to get it up and running - waving goodbye to
chargeable-hours productivity for those days - I've tended to file the
experience under "must try this again.....some other year".

AFAICT, the default Linux solution to configuration problems even for
first-level hardware and software - printers, software for anything beyond
word processing, internet browsing, and email - remains the same: if
you've got a problem, the solution is going to be "open a terminal window
and do it with a command line".

Frankly, I don't think that will ever change, and it consigns Linux to
marginal rather than widespread use. The last time I looked at the figures
(earlier this year), Linux's share of desktop use was still under 3%.
--
Cheers,
Harvey
Greg Goss
2017-07-26 15:03:33 UTC
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Post by HVS
Frankly, I don't think that will ever change, and it consigns Linux to
marginal rather than widespread use. The last time I looked at the figures
(earlier this year), Linux's share of desktop use was still under 3%.
Well, they can HIDE the Linux from you. I think Chromebook sits on
Linux. And then there's Android.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
HVS
2017-07-26 15:23:35 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by HVS
Frankly, I don't think that will ever change, and it consigns Linux to
marginal rather than widespread use. The last time I looked at the
figures (earlier this year), Linux's share of desktop use was still
under 3%.
Well, they can HIDE the Linux from you. I think Chromebook sits on
Linux. And then there's Android.
Do you think Android would be viable as a desktop OS?
--
Cheers,
Harvey
s***@gmail.com
2017-07-26 20:23:45 UTC
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Post by HVS
Post by Greg Goss
Post by HVS
Frankly, I don't think that will ever change, and it consigns Linux to
marginal rather than widespread use. The last time I looked at the
figures (earlier this year), Linux's share of desktop use was still
under 3%.
Well, they can HIDE the Linux from you. I think Chromebook sits on
Linux. And then there's Android.
Do you think Android would be viable as a desktop OS?
No, but that's why Google developed Chrome (the OS; not to be confused with Chrome the browser). And now that games are available in HTML5, you don't need to leave the browser,either.

Try a Chromebook when you're in BestBuy (or local source of tech shopping).

/dps
Snidely
2017-07-27 06:17:51 UTC
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Post by HVS
Frankly, I don't think that will ever change, and it consigns Linux to
marginal rather than widespread use. The last time I looked at the figures
(earlier this year), Linux's share of desktop use was still under 3%.
Well, considering how much floor space big box stores devote to linux
systems, I think the problem isn't just "open a terminal window". A
shrink-wrapped linux system is certainly possible ... see again
Chromebooks. Some of the non-Sony, non-NES, non-Redmond gaming boxes
are also linux boxes in disguise, and I suspect that the network
storage boxes are, also. Oh, and Raspberry Pi.

/dps
--
"I am not given to exaggeration, and when I say a thing I mean it"
_Roughing It_, Mark Twain
Les Albert
2017-07-26 17:29:01 UTC
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Post by Snidely
Post by Richard Hershberger
Windows 10 is based on the principle that I
should be using my computer for the stuff that Microsoft wants me to, so
everything is designed to push that. I am coming around to the idea that my
next computer will run Linux. I am not a computer geek and don't really want
the hassle of a non-standard system, but I gather that there are versions
nowadays that are pretty hassle-free.
I think that you want the Mint variety, but I haven't actually tried
it. I've used Fedora, Centos, and Ubuntu without too much hassle,
though. The biggest challenge is setting up CUPS to use a printer, and
I'm batting 666 on that. But I plead guilty to also having used Xenix
286, System V, 4.2 BSD, and that wierd blend Sun ran on the 386
workstations; what I say may not reflect anything you consider reality.
One of my machines has a version of Gnome (an old version, true) that
does irritate me because ALT-TAB doesn't cycle through *windows*, it
cycles through *groups* of windows, and when I tab to "terminal", it
generally doesn't put on top the terminal window I was hoping for.
The non-cycling through Windows is a well known problem with older
versions of Gnome, but there is a correction. You will have to
contact the manufacturer. Email them and ask them for "Alt-Tab
Addition Kit". The kit will probably be the no-fault type, and either
system A or system B can be used. When operating system A, depress
the lever and a plastic removal ring will be dispensed through the
slot at the the bottom. When you have fastened the adhesive lip,
attach the connection marked by the large "X" to the outlet hose.
Twist the silver colored ring one inch below the connection point
until you feel it lock. The kit is now ready to use. Turn on the
monitor and computer, or the laptop, and install the program from the
CD that was included with the addition kit. The "Remove Base" is
activated by the small switch on the lip. When securing, twist the
ring back to its original position so that the two orange lines meet.
Disconnect the ring and try removing the base. If the base does not
remove then press the red release switch several times. The base
should then become removed and the program can be exited if the green
box in the upper left corner of the screen is blinking, and the
Alt-Tab addition entrance should be revealed on the pepsal. If the
red light is blinking then one of the "base removal" requirements has
not been met. You will have to return the pepsal to the manufacturer
and request the "automatic" version of the Alt-Tab addition kit.

Les
Snidely
2017-07-27 06:21:12 UTC
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Post by Les Albert
Post by Snidely
Post by Richard Hershberger
Windows 10 is based on the principle that I
should be using my computer for the stuff that Microsoft wants me to, so
everything is designed to push that. I am coming around to the idea that
my next computer will run Linux. I am not a computer geek and don't
really want the hassle of a non-standard system, but I gather that there
are versions nowadays that are pretty hassle-free.
I think that you want the Mint variety, but I haven't actually tried
it. I've used Fedora, Centos, and Ubuntu without too much hassle,
though. The biggest challenge is setting up CUPS to use a printer, and
I'm batting 666 on that. But I plead guilty to also having used Xenix
286, System V, 4.2 BSD, and that wierd blend Sun ran on the 386
workstations; what I say may not reflect anything you consider reality.
One of my machines has a version of Gnome (an old version, true) that
does irritate me because ALT-TAB doesn't cycle through *windows*, it
cycles through *groups* of windows, and when I tab to "terminal", it
generally doesn't put on top the terminal window I was hoping for.
The non-cycling through Windows is a well known problem with older
versions of Gnome, but there is a correction. You will have to
contact the manufacturer. Email them and ask them for "Alt-Tab
Addition Kit". The kit will probably be the no-fault type, and either
system A or system B can be used. When operating system A, depress
the lever and a plastic removal ring will be dispensed through the
slot at the the bottom. When you have fastened the adhesive lip,
attach the connection marked by the large "X" to the outlet hose.
Twist the silver colored ring one inch below the connection point
until you feel it lock. The kit is now ready to use. Turn on the
monitor and computer, or the laptop, and install the program from the
CD that was included with the addition kit. The "Remove Base" is
activated by the small switch on the lip. When securing, twist the
ring back to its original position so that the two orange lines meet.
Disconnect the ring and try removing the base. If the base does not
remove then press the red release switch several times. The base
should then become removed and the program can be exited if the green
box in the upper left corner of the screen is blinking, and the
Alt-Tab addition entrance should be revealed on the pepsal. If the
red light is blinking then one of the "base removal" requirements has
not been met. You will have to return the pepsal to the manufacturer
and request the "automatic" version of the Alt-Tab addition kit.
Pepsals should not be near any lips.

Also, some manufacturers are replacing the CD with a MicroSD, so be
sure and have a magnifying glass ready.

/dps
--
I have always been glad we weren't killed that night. I do not know
any particular reason, but I have always been glad.
_Roughing It_, Mark Twain
Howard
2017-07-25 16:31:20 UTC
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Post by Peter Boulding
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
http://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-only-slightly-more-
popular-than-windows-xp-among-firms/
Post by Peter Boulding
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
http://tinyurl.com/y9o3whse
I object strongly to the use of the word "popular" given that
Microsoft have been allowed to---and do---make it damnably difficult
to acquire a PC loaded with any version of Windows other than 10.
To clarify things, that article is about business users, and companies
with a lot of users have a lot more flexibility than home users.

Not that MS doesn't want to push 10 on businesses too, but they have
less leverage. Many businesses still don't see the value in buying a
ton of new software and hardware for units dedicated to a narrow set of
tasks, which is what a lot of those old XP boxes are doing.
Post by Peter Boulding
Note, BTW, that the MSM's near-universal assumption that the majority
of systems affected by Wannacry and similar ransomware were running XP
was wide of the mark: in fact the majority of affected systems were
running Windows 7.
Since they lacked the relevant patch, these systems must have had
auto-updating switched off---probably because their owners had done so
for fear of being auto-"upgraded" to Windows 10.
I started reading more carefully about Windows Updates when the Win 10
upgrade started being pushed. The sources I've read complain that
Microsoft's upgrade process is getting worse and worse, with increases
in various subsets of users getting hit with bugs. To be fair, I'm sure
people have been complaining since Windows Updates began, but does seem
that Microsoft has been flailing a bit with its OSes since 8 came out.
Questor
2017-07-27 21:47:41 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
Post by Peter Boulding
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
http://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-only-slightly-more-
popular-than-windows-xp-among-firms/
Post by Peter Boulding
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
http://tinyurl.com/y9o3whse
I object strongly to the use of the word "popular" given that
Microsoft have been allowed to---and do---make it damnably difficult
to acquire a PC loaded with any version of Windows other than 10.
To clarify things, that article is about business users, and companies
with a lot of users have a lot more flexibility than home users.
Not that MS doesn't want to push 10 on businesses too, but they have
less leverage. Many businesses still don't see the value in buying a
ton of new software and hardware for units dedicated to a narrow set of
tasks, which is what a lot of those old XP boxes are doing.
I have seen the full range of responses from one extreme to the other, but
companies generally follow suit sooner rather later. I understand the reasons
they do so, even if there is little to be gained for their end users. Many of
those reasons don't apply for individuals, who are subject to the expense and
effort of an "upgrade" without receiving any benefit.

When Office 2007 was released with its radical interface change from menus to
"ribbon bars" and a new backwards-incompatible file format, I thought there
would be a huge pushback from corporations. I expected them to balk at the
training costs for users and support, and at the potential problems of
maintaining a library of documents while stepping from one format to another.

They didn't.

The old saying, changed years ago to "nobody ever got fired for buying
Microsoft," has been modified again: "nobody ever got fired for staying on the
MIcrosoft upgrade treadmill."
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
Post by Peter Boulding
Note, BTW, that the MSM's near-universal assumption that the majority
of systems affected by Wannacry and similar ransomware were running XP
was wide of the mark: in fact the majority of affected systems were
running Windows 7.
Since they lacked the relevant patch, these systems must have had
auto-updating switched off---probably because their owners had done so
for fear of being auto-"upgraded" to Windows 10.
Over ten years ago there was a flurry of concern when it was revealed that
Microsoft's online registration system was assembling a profile of users' PCs --
the hardware configuration and what software was installed -- and sending it to
their servers.

Windows 10 not only does that, it regularly sends information to Microsoft about
what applications are used, when they are used and for how long, as well as web
browsing habits. Microsoft calls it "telemetry," and its very difficult to turn
it off. The operating system itself is performing the very definition of
spyware. Oh, and home users can't opt out of automatic updates either.
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
I started reading more carefully about Windows Updates when the Win 10
upgrade started being pushed. The sources I've read complain that
Microsoft's upgrade process is getting worse and worse, with increases
in various subsets of users getting hit with bugs. To be fair, I'm sure
people have been complaining since Windows Updates began, but does seem
that Microsoft has been flailing a bit with its OSes since 8 came out.
"Since the end of 2014, Microsoft's record of patches has been dismal.
At least 39 patches issued since then were defective and had to be
replaced. That is more than one defective patch a month. Three
replacement patches themselves were also defective and had to be replaced."

(http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/30/31#subj13)
B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-07-28 04:51:13 UTC
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Post by Questor
The old saying, changed years ago to "nobody ever got fired for buying
Microsoft," has been modified again: "nobody ever got fired for staying on the
MIcrosoft upgrade treadmill."
I have a friend who's from Japan. I like Pepsi, he likes Pepsi.
But he can not be seen by his countrymen drinking anything other
than Coca-Cola. The peer pressure is powerful.
Les Albert
2017-07-28 05:00:45 UTC
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Thu, 27 Jul 2017
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
Post by Questor
The old saying, changed years ago to "nobody ever got fired for buying
Microsoft," has been modified again: "nobody ever got fired for staying on the
MIcrosoft upgrade treadmill."
I have a friend who's from Japan. I like Pepsi, he likes Pepsi.
But he can not be seen by his countrymen drinking anything other
than Coca-Cola. The peer pressure is powerful.
It's not about peer pressure. It's about keeping one's job by not
screwing up.

Les
Questor
2017-07-28 15:19:11 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
Post by Questor
The old saying, changed years ago to "nobody ever got fired for buying
Microsoft," has been modified again: "nobody ever got fired for staying on the
MIcrosoft upgrade treadmill."
I have a friend who's from Japan. I like Pepsi, he likes Pepsi.
But he can not be seen by his countrymen drinking anything other
than Coca-Cola. The peer pressure is powerful.
The peer pressure may indeed be powerful, but the justification based on ROI is
non-existent.
Les Albert
2017-07-28 15:35:03 UTC
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Post by Questor
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
Post by Questor
The old saying, changed years ago to "nobody ever got fired for buying
Microsoft," has been modified again: "nobody ever got fired for staying on the
MIcrosoft upgrade treadmill."
I have a friend who's from Japan. I like Pepsi, he likes Pepsi.
But he can not be seen by his countrymen drinking anything other
than Coca-Cola. The peer pressure is powerful.
The peer pressure may indeed be powerful, but the justification based on ROI is
non-existent.
LeROI

Les
Greg Goss
2017-07-29 01:37:57 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
Post by Questor
The old saying, changed years ago to "nobody ever got fired for buying
Microsoft," has been modified again: "nobody ever got fired for staying on the
MIcrosoft upgrade treadmill."
I have a friend who's from Japan. I like Pepsi, he likes Pepsi.
But he can not be seen by his countrymen drinking anything other
than Coca-Cola. The peer pressure is powerful.
Back in 1992, I was a household mover specialized in Hong Kong
immigrants. They always had "New Coke" for us, most of a decade after
it had vanished from local stores.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Greg Goss
2017-07-29 01:36:55 UTC
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Post by Questor
When Office 2007 was released with its radical interface change from menus to
"ribbon bars" and a new backwards-incompatible file format, I thought there
would be a huge pushback from corporations. I expected them to balk at the
training costs for users and support, and at the potential problems of
maintaining a library of documents while stepping from one format to another.
They didn't.
Microsoft issued an add-on that allowed Office 2003 to open, modify
and save the new formats. I was running 2003 at the time and it was
seamless.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
B***@BillTurlock.com
2017-07-25 18:42:24 UTC
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On Tue, 25 Jul 2017 10:31:55 +0100, Peter Boulding
Post by Peter Boulding
Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
http://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-only-slightly-more-popular-than-windows-xp-among-firms/
http://tinyurl.com/y9o3whse
I object strongly to the use of the word "popular" given that Microsoft have
been allowed to---and do---make it damnably difficult to acquire a PC loaded
with any version of Windows other than 10.
Note, BTW, that the MSM's near-universal assumption that the majority of
systems affected by Wannacry and similar ransomware were running XP was wide
of the mark: in fact the majority of affected systems were running Windows
7.
Since they lacked the relevant patch, these systems must have had
auto-updating switched off---probably because their owners had done so for
fear of being auto-"upgraded" to Windows 10.
IDNKT
TY
Beaver Fever
2017-07-27 15:56:47 UTC
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Post by B***@BillTurlock.com
http://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-only-slightly-more-popular-than-windows-xp-among-firms/
http://tinyurl.com/y9o3whse
I fucking hate Windows 10. And it keylogs and sends out everything.
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