Discussion:
Fun with Thermite
(too old to reply)
a***@yahoo.com
2008-12-13 19:04:40 UTC
Permalink


Somebody doesn't like the French......
Jeff Wisnia
2008-12-13 20:12:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@yahoo.com
http://youtu.be/WrCWLpRc1yM
Somebody doesn't like the French......
Thermite is sometimes used for in situ welding as this other You Tube
video shows:



Watching that welding video reminded me of a story (probably apocryphal)
I heard while a student at MIT 50+ years ago. Back then the MTA (The
Massachusetts Transit Authority, the subject of a song made famous by
the Kingston Trio.) had trolley tracks running along Massachusetts
Avenue in Cambridge, passing right in front of my alma mater.

The story was that some "hackers" pretended that their automobile was
disabled and blocking the trolley tracks. When the next trolley train
came along it had to stop. While it was standing there, some other guys
snuck out and shoved a small bag of thermite between one of the train's
wheels and the track and lit it, welding the wheel to the track and
freezing the train right there.

The reason I think that probably never happened (but it could have)is
because the first rule in the code of "hacking" at MIT is to do no damage.

Thanks for the mammarys,

Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
The speed of light is 1.98*10^14 fathoms per fortnight.
Peter Ward
2008-12-13 21:28:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Post by a***@yahoo.com
http://youtu.be/WrCWLpRc1yM
Somebody doesn't like the French......
Thermite is sometimes used for in situ welding as this other You Tube
http://youtu.be/nR6K90cR8Lg
Watching that welding video reminded me of a story (probably apocryphal)
I heard while a student at MIT 50+ years ago. Back then the MTA (The
Massachusetts Transit Authority, the subject of a song made famous by
the Kingston Trio.) had trolley tracks running along Massachusetts
Avenue in Cambridge, passing right in front of my alma mater.
The story was that some "hackers" pretended that their automobile was
disabled and blocking the trolley tracks. When the next trolley train
came along it had to stop. While it was standing there, some other guys
snuck out and shoved a small bag of thermite between one of the train's
wheels and the track and lit it, welding the wheel to the track and
freezing the train right there.
The reason I think that probably never happened (but it could have)is
because the first rule in the code of "hacking" at MIT is to do no damage.
Thanks for the mammarys,
Heh! The latest periodic video for Fe described a similar trick at
Berkeley, with the same result. It was the first time I'd seen a
thermite reaction as well, only a couple of days ago.

http://www.periodicvideos.com/videos/026.htm

I found nothing on Snopes.
--
Peter

I'm an alien
email: home at peteward dot gotadsl dot co dot uk
I am not aware of any data about that, but I will be pleased to make some up.
- Les Albert
a***@yahoo.com
2008-12-13 21:51:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Ward
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Post by a***@yahoo.com
http://youtu.be/WrCWLpRc1yM
Somebody doesn't like the French......
Thermite is sometimes used for in situ welding as this other You Tube
http://youtu.be/nR6K90cR8Lg
Watching that welding video reminded me of a story (probably apocryphal)
I heard while a student at MIT 50+ years ago. Back then the MTA (The
Massachusetts Transit Authority, the subject of a song made famous by
the Kingston Trio.) had trolley tracks running along Massachusetts
Avenue in Cambridge, passing right in front of my alma mater.
The story was that some "hackers" pretended that their automobile was
disabled and blocking the trolley tracks. When the next trolley train
came along it had to stop. While it was standing there, some other guys
snuck out and shoved a small bag of thermite between one of the train's
wheels and the track and lit it, welding the wheel to the track and
freezing the train right there.
The reason I think that probably never happened (but it could have)is
because the first rule in the code of "hacking" at MIT is to do no damage.
Thanks for the mammarys,
Heh! The latest periodic video for Fe described a similar trick at
Berkeley, with the same result. It was the first time I'd seen a
thermite reaction as well, only a couple of days ago.
http://www.periodicvideos.com/videos/026.htm
I found nothing on Snopes.
Note that unlike MIT, at Berkeley there is no such prohibition on
damage by hackers, although perhaps the person(s) responsible for
putting the Mickey Mouse hands on the Campanile Clock didn't realize
how much damage they would do.
Supposedly profs at Cal Tech would sometimes find their cars in their
classrooms and the students managed to disassemble a Navy jet.
Jeff Wisnia
2008-12-14 04:59:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Ward
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Post by a***@yahoo.com
http://youtu.be/WrCWLpRc1yM
Somebody doesn't like the French......
Thermite is sometimes used for in situ welding as this other You Tube
http://youtu.be/nR6K90cR8Lg
Watching that welding video reminded me of a story (probably apocryphal)
I heard while a student at MIT 50+ years ago. Back then the MTA (The
Massachusetts Transit Authority, the subject of a song made famous by
the Kingston Trio.) had trolley tracks running along Massachusetts
Avenue in Cambridge, passing right in front of my alma mater.
The story was that some "hackers" pretended that their automobile was
disabled and blocking the trolley tracks. When the next trolley train
came along it had to stop. While it was standing there, some other guys
snuck out and shoved a small bag of thermite between one of the train's
wheels and the track and lit it, welding the wheel to the track and
freezing the train right there.
The reason I think that probably never happened (but it could have)is
because the first rule in the code of "hacking" at MIT is to do no damage.
Thanks for the mammarys,
Heh! The latest periodic video for Fe described a similar trick at
Berkeley, with the same result. It was the first time I'd seen a
thermite reaction as well, only a couple of days ago.
http://www.periodicvideos.com/videos/026.htm
So much for ".....But not in Nottingham."

Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
The speed of light is 1.98*10^14 fathoms per fortnight.
Post by Peter Ward
I found nothing on Snopes.
Charlie Pearce
2009-01-06 21:56:52 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 13 Dec 2008 23:59:26 -0500, Jeff Wisnia
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Post by Peter Ward
http://www.periodicvideos.com/videos/026.htm
So much for ".....But not in Nottingham."
Ah! My alma mater!

Charlie
--
Email killed by spammers - please ask for the real one.
Charlie Pearce
2009-01-06 22:07:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Ward
Heh! The latest periodic video for Fe described a similar trick at
Berkeley, with the same result. It was the first time I'd seen a
thermite reaction as well, only a couple of days ago.
http://www.periodicvideos.com/videos/026.htm
The tower block you can just about see over the presenter's left
shoulder at 2:56 is the one I abseiled down several years ago.

Charlie
--
Email killed by spammers - please ask for the real one.
Charles Wm. Dimmick
2008-12-14 19:35:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Watching that welding video reminded me of a story (probably apocryphal)
I heard while a student at MIT 50+ years ago. Back then the MTA (The
Massachusetts Transit Authority, the subject of a song made famous by
the Kingston Trio.) had trolley tracks running along Massachusetts
Avenue in Cambridge, passing right in front of my alma mater.
The story was that some "hackers" pretended that their automobile was
disabled and blocking the trolley tracks. When the next trolley train
came along it had to stop. While it was standing there, some other guys
snuck out and shoved a small bag of thermite between one of the train's
wheels and the track and lit it, welding the wheel to the track and
freezing the train right there.
An identical story, changing only the location and the name of
the trolley line, is told at Colorado School of Mines, where the
incident supposedly happened in the 1940s, and involved the
trolley line that came from Denver to Golden.

The story is mentioned here:
http://catb.org/esr/jargon/html/meaning-of-hack.html
where CMU refers to Carnegie Mellon University, not to
Colorado Mines.
M C Hamster
2008-12-13 22:17:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@yahoo.com
http://youtu.be/WrCWLpRc1yM
Somebody doesn't like the French......
Here's a kind of cool one with liquid nitrogen.

--
M C Hamster "Big Wheel Keep on Turning" -- Creedence Clearwater Revival
D.F. Manno
2008-12-14 03:26:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by M C Hamster
Post by a***@yahoo.com
http://youtu.be/WrCWLpRc1yM
Somebody doesn't like the French......
Here's a kind of cool one with liquid nitrogen.
http://youtu.be/w2mj-Sq2oeo
Following some of the "Related Videos" links led me to people walking on
custard. I'd never heard of "non-Newtonian fluids" before.
--
D.F. Manno | ***@mail.com

This time _we_ won. This time _you_ get over it.
Hactar
2008-12-14 04:33:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by D.F. Manno
Post by M C Hamster
Post by a***@yahoo.com
http://youtu.be/WrCWLpRc1yM
Somebody doesn't like the French......
Here's a kind of cool one with liquid nitrogen.
http://youtu.be/w2mj-Sq2oeo
Following some of the "Related Videos" links led me to people walking on
custard. I'd never heard of "non-Newtonian fluids" before.
Look up "ooblick". Physics-geek party toy.
--
-eben ***@vTerYizUonI.nOetP royalty.mine.nu:81
If you need someone to blame
Throw a rock in the air
You'll hit someone guilty -- U2, _Zooropa_, "Dirty Day"
Veronique
2008-12-14 05:21:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by D.F. Manno
Post by M C Hamster
Post by a***@yahoo.com
http://youtu.be/WrCWLpRc1yM
Somebody doesn't like the French......
Here's a kind of cool one with liquid nitrogen.
http://youtu.be/w2mj-Sq2oeo
Following some of the "Related Videos" links led me to people walking on
custard. I'd never heard of "non-Newtonian fluids" before.
Just cornstarch and water, uncooked. If you have cornstarch at home,
you can mix some up with cold water in a bowl and play with the
properties with your finger. Weird stuff!


V.
--
Veronique Chez Sheep
Greg Goss
2008-12-14 08:36:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by D.F. Manno
Post by M C Hamster
Post by a***@yahoo.com
http://youtu.be/WrCWLpRc1yM
Somebody doesn't like the French......
Here's a kind of cool one with liquid nitrogen.
http://youtu.be/w2mj-Sq2oeo
Following some of the "Related Videos" links led me to people walking on
custard. I'd never heard of "non-Newtonian fluids" before.
Not really custard. The most affordable such fluid is cornstarch
based. I've run into people who grew up playing with such stuff,
calling it "oobleck". They had cooler parents than mine.
--
"Recessions catch what the auditors miss." (Galbraith)
Lee Ayrton
2008-12-14 14:49:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Post by D.F. Manno
Following some of the "Related Videos" links led me to people walking on
custard. I'd never heard of "non-Newtonian fluids" before.
Not really custard. The most affordable such fluid is cornstarch
based. I've run into people who grew up playing with such stuff,
calling it "oobleck". They had cooler parents than mine.
Our old friend anti-thixotropy. It is a fluid until you apply force to
it, then it becomes a semi-solid. See:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thixotropy
--
"I have never yet encountered a semi-trailer in my bathroom." Jen puts a
bright face on the state of the transit system in AFC-A.
M C Hamster
2008-12-14 16:39:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Post by D.F. Manno
Post by M C Hamster
Post by a***@yahoo.com
http://youtu.be/WrCWLpRc1yM
Somebody doesn't like the French......
Here's a kind of cool one with liquid nitrogen.
http://youtu.be/w2mj-Sq2oeo
Following some of the "Related Videos" links led me to people walking on
custard. I'd never heard of "non-Newtonian fluids" before.
Not really custard. The most affordable such fluid is cornstarch
based. I've run into people who grew up playing with such stuff,
calling it "oobleck". They had cooler parents than mine.
Oh yeah, that's wonderful stuff. A big messy, though.

I once brought it in to a meeting at Procter and Gamble talking about
new ideas for diaper technology. The idea was that you'd have the
diapers full of some substance kinda like cornstarch, and the poop
would turn into this weird substance that, when you put pressure on
it, suddenly solidifies and can be peeled off or manipulated. It
wasn't totally clear to me why that was something desirable except
that it vaguely seemed like maybe it would mean the poop wouldn't
stick to the kid's bottom and would come off clean as a whistle. Or
something like that.

It was fun seeing these high-level execs&G playing with oobleck on
the conference room table.

For another exercise, I had them all put on a Depends, and wear it for
an hour, to try to identify what "comfort" might mean for a baby. We
learned, among other things, that ventilation was a definite issue.

I did NOT make them pee into the Depends. We had to draw the line
somewhere.
--
M C Hamster "Big Wheel Keep on Turning" -- Creedence Clearwater Revival
Peter Ward
2008-12-14 16:54:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by M C Hamster
Post by Greg Goss
Post by D.F. Manno
Post by M C Hamster
Post by a***@yahoo.com
http://youtu.be/WrCWLpRc1yM
Somebody doesn't like the French......
Here's a kind of cool one with liquid nitrogen.
http://youtu.be/w2mj-Sq2oeo
Following some of the "Related Videos" links led me to people walking on
custard. I'd never heard of "non-Newtonian fluids" before.
Not really custard. The most affordable such fluid is cornstarch
based. I've run into people who grew up playing with such stuff,
calling it "oobleck". They had cooler parents than mine.
Oh yeah, that's wonderful stuff. A big messy, though.
I once brought it in to a meeting at Procter and Gamble talking about
new ideas for diaper technology. The idea was that you'd have the
diapers full of some substance kinda like cornstarch, and the poop
would turn into this weird substance that, when you put pressure on
it, suddenly solidifies and can be peeled off or manipulated. It
wasn't totally clear to me why that was something desirable except
that it vaguely seemed like maybe it would mean the poop wouldn't
stick to the kid's bottom and would come off clean as a whistle. Or
something like that.
I get the impression that parents enjoy playing with shit, so maybe
they want to preserve it as play-doh for their kids when they're
older.
--
Peter

I'm an alien
email: home at peteward dot gotadsl dot co dot uk
I think his portrayal of zombie lust and carnal desires is by far the most sensitive of the genre.
- N Jill Marsh
M C Hamster
2008-12-14 17:47:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Ward
Post by M C Hamster
I once brought it in to a meeting at Procter and Gamble talking about
new ideas for diaper technology. The idea was that you'd have the
diapers full of some substance kinda like cornstarch, and the poop
would turn into this weird substance that, when you put pressure on
it, suddenly solidifies and can be peeled off or manipulated. It
wasn't totally clear to me why that was something desirable except
that it vaguely seemed like maybe it would mean the poop wouldn't
stick to the kid's bottom and would come off clean as a whistle. Or
something like that.
I get the impression that parents enjoy playing with shit, so maybe
they want to preserve it as play-doh for their kids when they're
older.
I understand, if you are not a parent, why it may seem like that. I
remember being at gatherings with other young parents, and us sharing
the most fascinating details about our young kids' bowel movements,
and us all being wildly interested. I mean, this stuff is a central
part of our lives at that stage.

That disappears once the kids are toilet trained, fortunately. (If
there are cases this is not true, I don't want to think about them.)

I do also remember that when we had kids, our set of social friends
changed totally. The friends without kids disappeared, and a new set
of friends with kids suddenly appeared. I do understand the reasons
for the former phenomenon, totally.
--
M C Hamster "Big Wheel Keep on Turning" -- Creedence Clearwater Revival
Charles Bishop
2008-12-14 22:28:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by M C Hamster
Post by Peter Ward
Post by M C Hamster
I once brought it in to a meeting at Procter and Gamble talking about
new ideas for diaper technology. The idea was that you'd have the
diapers full of some substance kinda like cornstarch, and the poop
would turn into this weird substance that, when you put pressure on
it, suddenly solidifies and can be peeled off or manipulated. It
wasn't totally clear to me why that was something desirable except
that it vaguely seemed like maybe it would mean the poop wouldn't
stick to the kid's bottom and would come off clean as a whistle. Or
something like that.
I get the impression that parents enjoy playing with shit, so maybe
they want to preserve it as play-doh for their kids when they're
older.
I understand, if you are not a parent, why it may seem like that. I
remember being at gatherings with other young parents, and us sharing
the most fascinating details about our young kids' bowel movements,
and us all being wildly interested. I mean, this stuff is a central
part of our lives at that stage.
That disappears once the kids are toilet trained, fortunately. (If
there are cases this is not true, I don't want to think about them.)
If the child is Royalty, I understand there a a person singularly
concerned with the Royal Poop.

I don't remember discussing a child's poop, other than with the mother and
then only when it indicated a possible illness. Do the same with the cats
now, again only if there is indication of a problem.
--
charles
M C Hamster
2008-12-15 02:28:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by M C Hamster
Post by Peter Ward
Post by M C Hamster
I once brought it in to a meeting at Procter and Gamble talking about
new ideas for diaper technology. The idea was that you'd have the
diapers full of some substance kinda like cornstarch, and the poop
would turn into this weird substance that, when you put pressure on
it, suddenly solidifies and can be peeled off or manipulated. It
wasn't totally clear to me why that was something desirable except
that it vaguely seemed like maybe it would mean the poop wouldn't
stick to the kid's bottom and would come off clean as a whistle. Or
something like that.
I get the impression that parents enjoy playing with shit, so maybe
they want to preserve it as play-doh for their kids when they're
older.
I understand, if you are not a parent, why it may seem like that. I
remember being at gatherings with other young parents, and us sharing
the most fascinating details about our young kids' bowel movements,
and us all being wildly interested. I mean, this stuff is a central
part of our lives at that stage.
That disappears once the kids are toilet trained, fortunately. (If
there are cases this is not true, I don't want to think about them.)
If the child is Royalty, I understand there a a person singularly
concerned with the Royal Poop.
I don't remember discussing a child's poop, other than with the mother and
then only when it indicated a possible illness.
I'm sorry you were so repressed. Really, the discussions were quite
interesting.
Post by Charles Bishop
Do the same with the cats
now, again only if there is indication of a problem.
Perv.
--
M C Hamster "Big Wheel Keep on Turning" -- Creedence Clearwater Revival
Charles Wm. Dimmick
2008-12-15 22:49:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by M C Hamster
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by M C Hamster
Post by Peter Ward
Post by M C Hamster
I once brought it in to a meeting at Procter and Gamble talking about
new ideas for diaper technology. The idea was that you'd have the
diapers full of some substance kinda like cornstarch, and the poop
would turn into this weird substance that, when you put pressure on
it, suddenly solidifies and can be peeled off or manipulated. It
wasn't totally clear to me why that was something desirable except
that it vaguely seemed like maybe it would mean the poop wouldn't
stick to the kid's bottom and would come off clean as a whistle. Or
something like that.
I get the impression that parents enjoy playing with shit, so maybe
they want to preserve it as play-doh for their kids when they're
older.
I understand, if you are not a parent, why it may seem like that. I
remember being at gatherings with other young parents, and us sharing
the most fascinating details about our young kids' bowel movements,
and us all being wildly interested. I mean, this stuff is a central
part of our lives at that stage.
That disappears once the kids are toilet trained, fortunately. (If
there are cases this is not true, I don't want to think about them.)
If the child is Royalty, I understand there a a person singularly
concerned with the Royal Poop.
I don't remember discussing a child's poop, other than with the mother and
then only when it indicated a possible illness.
I'm sorry you were so repressed. Really, the discussions were quite
interesting.
There was at one time a great interest in the poop of a former
British Prime Minister. In fact there was a book written about
it, called Winnie the Poo.

Charles
Greg Goss
2008-12-16 04:33:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles Wm. Dimmick
Post by M C Hamster
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by M C Hamster
Post by Peter Ward
Post by M C Hamster
I once brought it in to a meeting at Procter and Gamble talking about
new ideas for diaper technology. The idea was that you'd have the
diapers full of some substance kinda like cornstarch, and the poop
would turn into this weird substance that, when you put pressure on
it, suddenly solidifies and can be peeled off or manipulated. It
wasn't totally clear to me why that was something desirable except
that it vaguely seemed like maybe it would mean the poop wouldn't
stick to the kid's bottom and would come off clean as a whistle. Or
something like that.
I get the impression that parents enjoy playing with shit, so maybe
they want to preserve it as play-doh for their kids when they're
older.
I understand, if you are not a parent, why it may seem like that. I
remember being at gatherings with other young parents, and us sharing
the most fascinating details about our young kids' bowel movements,
and us all being wildly interested. I mean, this stuff is a central
part of our lives at that stage.
That disappears once the kids are toilet trained, fortunately. (If
there are cases this is not true, I don't want to think about them.)
If the child is Royalty, I understand there a a person singularly
concerned with the Royal Poop.
I don't remember discussing a child's poop, other than with the mother and
then only when it indicated a possible illness.
I'm sorry you were so repressed. Really, the discussions were quite
interesting.
There was at one time a great interest in the poop of a former
British Prime Minister. In fact there was a book written about
it, called Winnie the Poo.
"Part of our heritage"

is the original. I've been unable to find the Molson parody that goes
on about the bear's flatulence on zoo food.
--
"Recessions catch what the auditors miss." (Galbraith)
Opus the Penguin
2008-12-16 15:24:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
"Part of our heritage"
http://youtu.be/qMkm21rg04o
is the original. I've been unable to find the Molson parody that
goes on about the bear's flatulence on zoo food.
Speaking of zoo food and flatulence:

http://www.yourlocalguardian.co.uk/news/topstories/3979145.Chessington_gorillas_King_Pong_/
http://www.metro.co.uk/news/article.html?Zoo_apologises_after_animal_farting_outbreak&in_article_id=444063&in_page_id=34
--
Opus the Penguin
Maybe there's just something about the way I look that screams out "cheese smuggler". - Bill Kinkaid
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