Discussion:
(un) Favorite instrument
(too old to reply)
Bill Turlock
2006-01-16 03:41:06 UTC
Permalink
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.

But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.

What's yers?

Bill
Veronique
2006-01-16 03:53:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.


V.
--
Veronique Chez Sheep
Tim Wright
2006-01-16 04:34:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Veronique
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
V.
--
Veronique Chez Sheep
I can't think of any musical instrument that I don't like. Some styles
of singing, however really grate on my ears. The main one that comes to
mind is the growly guttural style some of the younger female singers
have adopted. Brittany Spears comes to mind. Makes me wish she'd just
hork up that hairball so she can sing properly.

Just my $.02.
--
Tim W
This space available.
Veronique
2006-01-16 04:38:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim Wright
Post by Veronique
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
I can't think of any musical instrument that I don't like. Some styles
of singing, however really grate on my ears. The main one that comes to
mind is the growly guttural style some of the younger female singers
have adopted. Brittany Spears comes to mind. Makes me wish she'd just
hork up that hairball so she can sing properly.
Who?
Post by Tim Wright
Just my $.02.
When I thought about instruments, it really depended on the music. I
like the trumpets in Handel's Messiah, but don't like brass in Big Band
music. Bagpipe was the one instrument I thought it would be hard to go
wrong with.


I guess I really get grumpy with the guy who plays a large plastic
trash can as a drum on the streets downtown at 2 AM. But that's more an
issue with lifestyle as with the instrument itself (eg, it'd be fine if
I didn't live downtown and be woken up by it.)


V.
--
Veronique Chez Sheep
darkon
2006-01-16 17:53:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim Wright
I can't think of any musical instrument that I don't like. Some
styles of singing, however really grate on my ears. The main
one that comes to mind is the growly guttural style some of the
younger female singers have adopted. Brittany Spears comes to
mind. Makes me wish she'd just hork up that hairball so she can
sing properly.
Just my $.02.
I like bluegrass music, but often don't care for the high, whiny,
nasal-sounding singing. Bill Monroe can get on my nerves (not
always). I do appreciate the "high lonesome" sound, but prefer
something like that found in Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder's
version of "Rank Stranger", because they can actually sing that high
without sounding like they're straining. Sometimes Alison Krauss can
send chills up my spine and put goosepimples on my arms.

Unverified anecdote about Bill Monroe and Alison Krauss: She was
playing at a festival somewhere while still a teenager and was known
primarily as a fiddler. She played a set with whatever band she was
with, and also sang a song or two with them. Afterwards, it's said
that Bill Monroe came up to her and said, "Little girl, put down your
fiddle and SING!"
Richard R. Hershberger
2006-01-16 19:02:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by darkon
Post by Tim Wright
I can't think of any musical instrument that I don't like. Some
styles of singing, however really grate on my ears. The main
one that comes to mind is the growly guttural style some of the
younger female singers have adopted. Brittany Spears comes to
mind. Makes me wish she'd just hork up that hairball so she can
sing properly.
Just my $.02.
I like bluegrass music, but often don't care for the high, whiny,
nasal-sounding singing. Bill Monroe can get on my nerves (not
always). I do appreciate the "high lonesome" sound, but prefer
something like that found in Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder's
version of "Rank Stranger", because they can actually sing that high
without sounding like they're straining. Sometimes Alison Krauss can
send chills up my spine and put goosepimples on my arms.
Unverified anecdote about Bill Monroe and Alison Krauss: She was
playing at a festival somewhere while still a teenager and was known
primarily as a fiddler. She played a set with whatever band she was
with, and also sang a song or two with them. Afterwards, it's said
that Bill Monroe came up to her and said, "Little girl, put down your
fiddle and SING!"
I too adore Alison Krauss, but with the proviso that her venures into
pop music do nothing for me. I can't begrudge her trying to cash in
(to be blunt about it) but I'm not happy about substituting mediocre
pop for first-rate bluegrass.

Richard R. Hershberger
darkon
2006-01-16 19:17:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard R. Hershberger
Post by darkon
Post by Tim Wright
I can't think of any musical instrument that I don't like.
Some styles of singing, however really grate on my ears. The
main one that comes to mind is the growly guttural style some
of the younger female singers have adopted. Brittany Spears
comes to mind. Makes me wish she'd just hork up that
hairball so she can sing properly.
Just my $.02.
I like bluegrass music, but often don't care for the high,
whiny, nasal-sounding singing. Bill Monroe can get on my
nerves (not always). I do appreciate the "high lonesome"
sound, but prefer something like that found in Ricky Skaggs and
Kentucky Thunder's version of "Rank Stranger", because they can
actually sing that high without sounding like they're
straining. Sometimes Alison Krauss can send chills up my spine
and put goosepimples on my arms.
Unverified anecdote about Bill Monroe and Alison Krauss: She
was playing at a festival somewhere while still a teenager and
was known primarily as a fiddler. She played a set with
whatever band she was with, and also sang a song or two with
them. Afterwards, it's said that Bill Monroe came up to her
and said, "Little girl, put down your fiddle and SING!"
I too adore Alison Krauss, but with the proviso that her venures
into pop music do nothing for me. I can't begrudge her trying
to cash in (to be blunt about it) but I'm not happy about
substituting mediocre pop for first-rate bluegrass.
Richard R. Hershberger
Very much agreed.

And she's cute, too. (Not that that matters, but it doesn't hurt.)
Bill Bonde ('Soli Deo Gloria')
2006-01-16 04:52:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Veronique
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
Annoying instruments? Didn't they make anonymous sax illegal on the
internet?
--
"He named his second child Jim after the horse that had brought him to
Washington. He caught his son one day writing 'James' on his lessons,
and he told the boy without raising his voice that if he had wanted to
name him 'James', that is what he would have done." -+Edward P. Jones,
"The Known World"
Charles Wm. Dimmick
2006-01-16 12:52:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Veronique
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
Essential in both Bolero and in Rhapsody in Blue.

Charles
Dover Beach
2006-01-16 13:52:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Veronique
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even
my _least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like
'em all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is
a good thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the
'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos,
four hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't
like the piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one
piano is enough. I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
V.
--
Veronique Chez Sheep
You can have all my share of bagpipes if you give me all your share of
sax. I love jazz saxophone.
--
Dover
Veronique
2006-01-16 17:08:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dover Beach
Post by Veronique
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
You can have all my share of bagpipes if you give me all your share of
sax. I love jazz saxophone.
Done!


V.
--
Veronique Chez Sheep
TedTheCat
2006-01-18 01:11:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dover Beach
You can have all my share of bagpipes if you give me all your share of
sax.
You have a very strong sax drive.
Wally Sevits
2006-01-16 17:44:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Veronique
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
Almost in complete agreement. Except in the soundtracks of Film Noir
movies, "Saxophones Make Noise".
--
TAZ
Veronique
2006-01-16 18:51:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wally Sevits
Post by Veronique
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
Almost in complete agreement. Except in the soundtracks of Film Noir
movies, "Saxophones Make Noise".
There is something deeply comforting in seeing both agreement with the
generality and having the exceptions pointed out (eg, "Bolero".)



V.
--
Veronique Chez Sheep
Hactar
2006-01-16 19:45:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Veronique
Post by Wally Sevits
Post by Veronique
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
Almost in complete agreement. Except in the soundtracks of Film Noir
movies, "Saxophones Make Noise".
There is something deeply comforting in seeing both agreement with the
generality and having the exceptions pointed out (eg, "Bolero".)
Saxophone's a relative latecomer (invented in what, 1842?), so there isn't
that much orchestral music written for it.
--
-eben ***@EtaRmpTabYayU.rIr.OcoPm home.tampabay.rr.com/hactar

And we never failed to fail / It was the easiest thing to do -- CSN
bill van
2006-01-16 21:30:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wally Sevits
Post by Veronique
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
Almost in complete agreement. Except in the soundtracks of Film Noir
movies, "Saxophones Make Noise".
Stan Getz, Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Ornette Coleman, John
Coltrane, Charlie Parker, and so many other great jazz players, all
dismissed for playing sax? Sad and strange. You're missing some wondrous
sounds.

bill
Charles Bishop
2006-01-16 22:08:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by Wally Sevits
Post by Veronique
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
Almost in complete agreement. Except in the soundtracks of Film Noir
movies, "Saxophones Make Noise".
Stan Getz, Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Ornette Coleman, John
Coltrane, Charlie Parker, and so many other great jazz players, all
dismissed for playing sax? Sad and strange. You're missing some wondrous
sounds.
This may be the voice of the plebians, but I liked Boots Randolph's sax work.
--
charles
Bob Ward
2006-01-17 01:14:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by bill van
Post by Wally Sevits
Post by Veronique
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
Almost in complete agreement. Except in the soundtracks of Film Noir
movies, "Saxophones Make Noise".
Stan Getz, Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Ornette Coleman, John
Coltrane, Charlie Parker, and so many other great jazz players, all
dismissed for playing sax? Sad and strange. You're missing some wondrous
sounds.
This may be the voice of the plebians, but I liked Boots Randolph's sax work.
One of the best episodes of the Tonight Show I ever saw featured Boots
Randolph, Floyd Cramer, and Chet Atkins jamming together.
John Hatpin
2006-01-16 23:21:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by Wally Sevits
Post by Veronique
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
Almost in complete agreement. Except in the soundtracks of Film Noir
movies, "Saxophones Make Noise".
Stan Getz, Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Ornette Coleman, John
Coltrane, Charlie Parker, and so many other great jazz players, all
dismissed for playing sax? Sad and strange. You're missing some wondrous
sounds.
Paul Gonsalves. Ben Webster. Johnny Hodges. Paul Desmond. Ernie
Royal. Jerry Mulligan. Tony Coe. Harry Carney. Whoever's playing
tenor on that BS&T track I'm listening to right now on Pandora.com.

How anyone can not like that sound ... I dunno, but it's just personal
preferences, presumably.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
Bill Turlock
2006-01-18 03:33:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Hatpin
Post by bill van
Post by Wally Sevits
Post by Veronique
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
Almost in complete agreement. Except in the soundtracks of Film Noir
movies, "Saxophones Make Noise".
Stan Getz, Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Ornette Coleman, John
Coltrane, Charlie Parker, and so many other great jazz players, all
dismissed for playing sax? Sad and strange. You're missing some wondrous
sounds.
Paul Gonsalves. Ben Webster. Johnny Hodges. Paul Desmond. Ernie
Royal. Jerry Mulligan. Tony Coe. Harry Carney. Whoever's playing
tenor on that BS&T track I'm listening to right now on Pandora.com.
How anyone can not like that sound ... I dunno, but it's just personal
preferences, presumably.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
Sometimes, when Desmond's playing, you gotta wonder whether it's a sax
or a flute...
!
John Hatpin
2006-01-18 04:24:18 UTC
Permalink
Bill Turlock wrote:

[Paul Desmond, jazz sax player]
Post by Bill Turlock
Sometimes, when Desmond's playing, you gotta wonder whether it's a sax
or a flute...
!
Indeed. He's got a sublimely gentle tone. And, IMO, he's underrated
as a player generally.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
Bill Turlock
2006-01-18 21:58:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Hatpin
[Paul Desmond, jazz sax player]
Post by Bill Turlock
Sometimes, when Desmond's playing, you gotta wonder whether it's a sax
or a flute...
!
Indeed. He's got a sublimely gentle tone. And, IMO, he's underrated
as a player generally.
Oh really! I don't follow the 'scene', but I'd always thought he had a
stellar rep.
Bill
John Hatpin
2006-01-19 00:07:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Turlock
Post by John Hatpin
[Paul Desmond, jazz sax player]
Post by Bill Turlock
Sometimes, when Desmond's playing, you gotta wonder whether it's a sax
or a flute...
Indeed. He's got a sublimely gentle tone. And, IMO, he's underrated
as a player generally.
Oh really! I don't follow the 'scene', but I'd always thought he had a
stellar rep.
I don't particularly follow any scene either, but I do get the
impression that Desmond is usually considered as that pretty-sounding
sax player who accompanies Brubeck, rather than as the skilled
improviser he is.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
Veronique
2006-01-16 23:30:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by Wally Sevits
Post by Veronique
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
Almost in complete agreement. Except in the soundtracks of Film Noir
movies, "Saxophones Make Noise".
Stan Getz, Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Ornette Coleman, John
Coltrane, Charlie Parker, and so many other great jazz players, all
dismissed for playing sax? Sad and strange. You're missing some wondrous
sounds.
For me, dismissed for playing jazz. The sax is incidental.


(It's the reason I gave up dating: when asked out for an evening of
wine and jazz, I couldn't supress a shudder.)


V.
--
Veronique Chez Sheep
Tim Wright
2006-01-16 23:33:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Veronique
Post by bill van
Post by Wally Sevits
Post by Veronique
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
Almost in complete agreement. Except in the soundtracks of Film Noir
movies, "Saxophones Make Noise".
Stan Getz, Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Ornette Coleman, John
Coltrane, Charlie Parker, and so many other great jazz players, all
dismissed for playing sax? Sad and strange. You're missing some wondrous
sounds.
For me, dismissed for playing jazz. The sax is incidental.
(It's the reason I gave up dating: when asked out for an evening of
wine and jazz, I couldn't supress a shudder.)
V.
--
Veronique Chez Sheep
So, you're against casual sax?
--
Tim W
This space available.
bill van
2006-01-17 00:13:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Veronique
Post by bill van
Post by Wally Sevits
Post by Veronique
Give me bagpipes, give me cello, but keep your saxaphone. Although I'm
sure there's a composition somewhere in which I appreciate it, having
declared my annoyance.
Almost in complete agreement. Except in the soundtracks of Film Noir
movies, "Saxophones Make Noise".
Stan Getz, Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Ornette Coleman, John
Coltrane, Charlie Parker, and so many other great jazz players, all
dismissed for playing sax? Sad and strange. You're missing some wondrous
sounds.
For me, dismissed for playing jazz. The sax is incidental.
(It's the reason I gave up dating: when asked out for an evening of
wine and jazz, I couldn't supress a shudder.)
Wow. Two of my favorite things. (wine and jazz, not shudders.) Have you
heard much jazz and didn't like any of it, or got turned off by
something you didn't like and never looked back?

I honestly can't imagine dismissing a whole category of music. I have
enjoyed at least some of every type I have heard, from medieval music to
hip-hop. My mainstay categories are classical, opera, jazz, blues, rock,
in no particular order.

bill
Veronique
2006-01-17 00:34:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by Veronique
For me, dismissed for playing jazz. The sax is incidental.
(It's the reason I gave up dating: when asked out for an evening of
wine and jazz, I couldn't supress a shudder.)
Wow. Two of my favorite things. (wine and jazz, not shudders.) Have you
heard much jazz and didn't like any of it, or got turned off by
something you didn't like and never looked back?
I played in orchestra (cello) as a sprout. I actually had a very good
friend who was a flutist and also played saxophone-- she tried and
tried (and on my part, I gave it my best open-mindedness) to help me
appreciate jazz. Never took. My conclusion was/is that jazz is more fun
to play than to listen too-- obviously, only my own opinion!
Post by bill van
I honestly can't imagine dismissing a whole category of music. I have
enjoyed at least some of every type I have heard, from medieval music to
hip-hop. My mainstay categories are classical, opera, jazz, blues, rock,
in no particular order.
In the rotation is Mozart's Requiem for classical, some Gregorian
chants for medieval, the Pogues for celtic rock, Dougie MacLean for
celtic celtic, and James McMurtry for bluegrass Americana.


I just can't really listen to jazz. If it's in the backgroud, it
eventually annoys me (though not right away the way rap does.) As far
as wine, I'm not much of a drinker, and somehow I missed out on the
whole wine thing. I've been trying to develop a palate for scotch,
though. (Not appreciating wine and jazz is a little bit like not having
a sense of humor-- I understand that some people enjoy it immensely, it
just doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me.) (Thank heavens I have a
sense of humor.)


V.
--
Veronique
E Brown
2006-01-17 07:44:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Veronique
I played in orchestra (cello) as a sprout. I actually had a very good
friend who was a flutist and also played saxophone-- she tried and
tried (and on my part, I gave it my best open-mindedness) to help me
appreciate jazz. Never took. My conclusion was/is that jazz is more fun
to play than to listen too-- obviously, only my own opinion!
With which I agree. I can appreciate the skill displayed, but jazz
always strikes me as the musical equivalent of calligraphy: it can be
beautiful, it's perfect for some occasions, but fussy and
over-elaborate for the most part. I listen to everything else without
qualm (heck, I was listening to X's "The Hungry Wolf in the car today)
- jazz usually has me reaching for the dial.
epbrown
John Hatpin
2006-01-17 16:32:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by E Brown
Post by Veronique
I played in orchestra (cello) as a sprout. I actually had a very good
friend who was a flutist and also played saxophone-- she tried and
tried (and on my part, I gave it my best open-mindedness) to help me
appreciate jazz. Never took. My conclusion was/is that jazz is more fun
to play than to listen too-- obviously, only my own opinion!
With which I agree. I can appreciate the skill displayed, but jazz
always strikes me as the musical equivalent of calligraphy: it can be
beautiful, it's perfect for some occasions, but fussy and
over-elaborate for the most part. I listen to everything else without
qualm (heck, I was listening to X's "The Hungry Wolf in the car today)
- jazz usually has me reaching for the dial.
Oddly enough, I almost completely agree with both of you, but love
jazz and play jazz piano. An hour ago, I told Pandora.com to play
jazz and right now, I'm listening to "Tropicana Nights" by Paquito
D'Rivera and it's excellent. Whoa, Nat Adderley's just come up.
"Tadd". Wow.

Anyway, yes, I'm far less surprised by both of your anti-jazz
sentiments than I am by meeting non-musicians who are heavily into
jazz. How can you get anything out of the music without understanding
what's put into it?

For example, our lovely neighbour Annie loves jazz. She'll call round
and tell me about an album by Miles she's just bought, and I'll think
"why does she enjoy it"? I don't have the same thoughts about any
other musical style.

My WAG is it's because I came to jazz as a musician and continue to
view it through a musician's eyes, even when I'm just sitting
listening to it. It's quite strange and unreasonable, but that's how
it is.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
bill van
2006-01-17 22:39:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Hatpin
Anyway, yes, I'm far less surprised by both of your anti-jazz
sentiments than I am by meeting non-musicians who are heavily into
jazz. How can you get anything out of the music without understanding
what's put into it?
For example, our lovely neighbour Annie loves jazz. She'll call round
and tell me about an album by Miles she's just bought, and I'll think
"why does she enjoy it"? I don't have the same thoughts about any
other musical style.
My WAG is it's because I came to jazz as a musician and continue to
view it through a musician's eyes, even when I'm just sitting
listening to it. It's quite strange and unreasonable, but that's how
it is.
It's not only unreasonable but it's insulting. For heaven's sake, how
many things do you enjoy watching or reading or listening to or eating
or drinking or reading Usenet on that you can't produce yourself? And
does that somehow make your enjoyment of them illegitimate?

You've just told me that my delight in a musical form I've been
listening to for 40 years does not measure up to yours because I don't
play it. (leaves the room, muttering darkly.)

bill
John Hatpin
2006-01-17 23:25:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by John Hatpin
Anyway, yes, I'm far less surprised by both of your anti-jazz
sentiments than I am by meeting non-musicians who are heavily into
jazz. How can you get anything out of the music without understanding
what's put into it?
For example, our lovely neighbour Annie loves jazz. She'll call round
and tell me about an album by Miles she's just bought, and I'll think
"why does she enjoy it"? I don't have the same thoughts about any
other musical style.
My WAG is it's because I came to jazz as a musician and continue to
view it through a musician's eyes, even when I'm just sitting
listening to it. It's quite strange and unreasonable, but that's how
it is.
It's not only unreasonable but it's insulting.
"Insulting"? For heaven's sake, read for clarity.
Post by bill van
For heaven's sake, how
many things do you enjoy watching or reading or listening to or eating
or drinking or reading Usenet on that you can't produce yourself? And
does that somehow make your enjoyment of them illegitimate?
No, and nowhere did I say that non-musicians' appreciation of jazz is
illegitimate either.
Post by bill van
You've just told me that my delight in a musical form I've been
listening to for 40 years does not measure up to yours because I don't
play it. (leaves the room, muttering darkly.)
I'm not insulting any jazz lover. I'm just saying that I can
understand why Veronique and Emmanuel don't enjoy jazz, 'cos it's hard
stuff to get into, and explaining that, in fact, I'm surprised and
delighted when non-musicians turn out to be jazz fans.

No comparison between you and me, no judgements, no "measure up to".

What is insulting about that, pray?
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
bill van
2006-01-18 00:25:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Hatpin
Post by bill van
Post by John Hatpin
Anyway, yes, I'm far less surprised by both of your anti-jazz
sentiments than I am by meeting non-musicians who are heavily into
jazz. How can you get anything out of the music without understanding
what's put into it?
For example, our lovely neighbour Annie loves jazz. She'll call round
and tell me about an album by Miles she's just bought, and I'll think
"why does she enjoy it"? I don't have the same thoughts about any
other musical style.
My WAG is it's because I came to jazz as a musician and continue to
view it through a musician's eyes, even when I'm just sitting
listening to it. It's quite strange and unreasonable, but that's how
it is.
It's not only unreasonable but it's insulting.
"Insulting"? For heaven's sake, read for clarity.
I did. You wrote, "How can you get anything out of the music without
understanding what's put into it?" And you don't see how your neighbour,
who doesn't play jazz, can enjoy it.
Post by John Hatpin
Post by bill van
For heaven's sake, how
many things do you enjoy watching or reading or listening to or eating
or drinking or reading Usenet on that you can't produce yourself? And
does that somehow make your enjoyment of them illegitimate?
No, and nowhere did I say that non-musicians' appreciation of jazz is
illegitimate either.
Post by bill van
You've just told me that my delight in a musical form I've been
listening to for 40 years does not measure up to yours because I don't
play it. (leaves the room, muttering darkly.)
I'm not insulting any jazz lover. I'm just saying that I can
understand why Veronique and Emmanuel don't enjoy jazz, 'cos it's hard
stuff to get into, and explaining that, in fact, I'm surprised and
delighted when non-musicians turn out to be jazz fans.
That last part wasn't in your original post. You wrote that you couldn't
see how non-players can enjoy listening to jazz, since they don't know
what goes into it.
Post by John Hatpin
No comparison between you and me, no judgements, no "measure up to".
What is insulting about that, pray?
I got a strong sense from your original post of, "you can't possibly
appreciate jazz the way I do because you don't play it."

I'm glad to see you saying now that you're delighted when non-musicians
enjoy jazz, so let's chalk it up to a misunderstanding.

bill
John Hatpin
2006-01-18 03:19:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by bill van
I'm glad to see you saying now that you're delighted when non-musicians
enjoy jazz, so let's chalk it up to a misunderstanding.
A big misunderstanding. I was describing my surprise that so many
people enjoy jazz without understanding how it works, and you seemed
to take that as some kind of proscriptive statement that people
*shouldn't* understand jazz unless they're players themselves. I
don't know why you read it that way - maybe I didn't phrase what I was
saying very well.

The main thrust of my statement was that I think I can understand why
Veronique and Emanuel don't like jazz - in fact, it surprises me that
so many people do.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
Bob Ward
2006-01-17 23:46:14 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 16:32:52 +0000, John Hatpin
Post by John Hatpin
Post by E Brown
Post by Veronique
I played in orchestra (cello) as a sprout. I actually had a very good
friend who was a flutist and also played saxophone-- she tried and
tried (and on my part, I gave it my best open-mindedness) to help me
appreciate jazz. Never took. My conclusion was/is that jazz is more fun
to play than to listen too-- obviously, only my own opinion!
With which I agree. I can appreciate the skill displayed, but jazz
always strikes me as the musical equivalent of calligraphy: it can be
beautiful, it's perfect for some occasions, but fussy and
over-elaborate for the most part. I listen to everything else without
qualm (heck, I was listening to X's "The Hungry Wolf in the car today)
- jazz usually has me reaching for the dial.
Oddly enough, I almost completely agree with both of you, but love
jazz and play jazz piano. An hour ago, I told Pandora.com to play
jazz and right now, I'm listening to "Tropicana Nights" by Paquito
D'Rivera and it's excellent. Whoa, Nat Adderley's just come up.
"Tadd". Wow.
Anyway, yes, I'm far less surprised by both of your anti-jazz
sentiments than I am by meeting non-musicians who are heavily into
jazz. How can you get anything out of the music without understanding
what's put into it?
For example, our lovely neighbour Annie loves jazz. She'll call round
and tell me about an album by Miles she's just bought, and I'll think
"why does she enjoy it"? I don't have the same thoughts about any
other musical style.
My WAG is it's because I came to jazz as a musician and continue to
view it through a musician's eyes, even when I'm just sitting
listening to it. It's quite strange and unreasonable, but that's how
it is.
Did I miss something? I've not seen any way to tell Pandora to play a
particular genre directly - only by specifying songs or artists who
fit the style.

I don't agree that you have to be a musician to enjoy jazz, any more
than you have to be a chef to enjoy fine food, or a brewer to enjoy
beer. How popular would football (or any sport, for that matter) be
if you had to know the mechanics behind it?
Greg Johnson
2006-01-18 00:36:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Ward
On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 16:32:52 +0000, John Hatpin
Post by John Hatpin
Anyway, yes, I'm far less surprised by both of your anti-jazz
sentiments than I am by meeting non-musicians who are heavily into
jazz. How can you get anything out of the music without understanding
what's put into it?
For example, our lovely neighbour Annie loves jazz. She'll call round
and tell me about an album by Miles she's just bought, and I'll think
"why does she enjoy it"? I don't have the same thoughts about any
other musical style.
My WAG is it's because I came to jazz as a musician and continue to
view it through a musician's eyes, even when I'm just sitting
listening to it. It's quite strange and unreasonable, but that's how
it is.
Did I miss something? I've not seen any way to tell Pandora to play a
particular genre directly - only by specifying songs or artists who
fit the style.
I don't agree that you have to be a musician to enjoy jazz, any more
than you have to be a chef to enjoy fine food, or a brewer to enjoy
beer. How popular would football (or any sport, for that matter) be
if you had to know the mechanics behind it?
Saying "I don't see why they enjoy it" is not saying "They must be lying
when they claim to enjoy it". I don't understand why so many people love
football, but that doesn't mean I think they don't exist.
--
Greg Johnson
John Hatpin
2006-01-18 03:27:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Greg Johnson
Post by Bob Ward
On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 16:32:52 +0000, John Hatpin
I don't agree that you have to be a musician to enjoy jazz, any more
than you have to be a chef to enjoy fine food, or a brewer to enjoy
beer. How popular would football (or any sport, for that matter) be
if you had to know the mechanics behind it?
Saying "I don't see why they enjoy it" is not saying "They must be lying
when they claim to enjoy it". I don't understand why so many people love
football, but that doesn't mean I think they don't exist.
At least someone understood what I was saying!
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
John Hatpin
2006-01-18 03:25:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Ward
Did I miss something? I've not seen any way to tell Pandora to play a
particular genre directly - only by specifying songs or artists who
fit the style.
Yes, that's how I've done it. Just put into a channel the people who
play in a genre or sub-genre. For example, I have two channels
playing soul music - one has Tower of Power and Average White Band and
Stevie Wonder and so on, the other more of the late-night stuff like
Barry White and Donny Hathaway, which is more my wife's cup of tea.
Post by Bob Ward
I don't agree that you have to be a musician to enjoy jazz, any more
than you have to be a chef to enjoy fine food, or a brewer to enjoy
beer. How popular would football (or any sport, for that matter) be
if you had to know the mechanics behind it?
Since you and Bill Van have read that into it, it's obviously my
ill-chosen wording. I'm not saying that you have to be a musician to
enjoy jazz, just that I keep being surprised that non-musicians do so,
and regard that surprise as a quirk of my own past.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
Bill Turlock
2006-01-18 03:42:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Hatpin
Post by Bob Ward
Did I miss something? I've not seen any way to tell Pandora to play a
particular genre directly - only by specifying songs or artists who
fit the style.
Yes, that's how I've done it. Just put into a channel the people who
play in a genre or sub-genre. For example, I have two channels
playing soul music - one has Tower of Power and Average White Band and
Stevie Wonder and so on, the other more of the late-night stuff like
Barry White and Donny Hathaway, which is more my wife's cup of tea.
Post by Bob Ward
I don't agree that you have to be a musician to enjoy jazz, any more
than you have to be a chef to enjoy fine food, or a brewer to enjoy
beer. How popular would football (or any sport, for that matter) be
if you had to know the mechanics behind it?
Since you and Bill Van have read that into it, it's obviously my
ill-chosen wording. I'm not saying that you have to be a musician to
enjoy jazz, just that I keep being surprised that non-musicians do so,
and regard that surprise as a quirk of my own past.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
FWIW, John, I got your meaning right away, and yet when offens(c)e was
taken, I could see their point of view.
Bill
Bob Ward
2006-01-18 05:53:45 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 18 Jan 2006 03:25:36 +0000, John Hatpin
Post by John Hatpin
Post by Bob Ward
Did I miss something? I've not seen any way to tell Pandora to play a
particular genre directly - only by specifying songs or artists who
fit the style.
Yes, that's how I've done it. Just put into a channel the people who
play in a genre or sub-genre. For example, I have two channels
playing soul music - one has Tower of Power and Average White Band and
Stevie Wonder and so on, the other more of the late-night stuff like
Barry White and Donny Hathaway, which is more my wife's cup of tea.
Post by Bob Ward
I don't agree that you have to be a musician to enjoy jazz, any more
than you have to be a chef to enjoy fine food, or a brewer to enjoy
beer. How popular would football (or any sport, for that matter) be
if you had to know the mechanics behind it?
Since you and Bill Van have read that into it, it's obviously my
ill-chosen wording. I'm not saying that you have to be a musician to
enjoy jazz, just that I keep being surprised that non-musicians do so,
and regard that surprise as a quirk of my own past.
No harm, no foul - sometimes it helps to get some feedback to make
sure that cultural differences don't interfere with the meaning.

Speaking of cultural differences, I'm curious - do the differences in
driving translate to pedestrian traffic as well? Over here, we tend
to keep to the right on the streets and on the sidewalks (pavement
there, I guess?) Also, it seems that the normal flow in shopping
seems to be counter-clockwise - it feels more natural (to me, at
least) to turn right when entering a store to browse, then serpentine
through the store from one end to the other.
John Hatpin
2006-01-18 17:12:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Ward
Speaking of cultural differences, I'm curious - do the differences in
driving translate to pedestrian traffic as well? Over here, we tend
to keep to the right on the streets and on the sidewalks (pavement
there, I guess?)
Yes, "pavement" - "sidewalk" is never used.

I've not noticed any particular left/right thing in pedestrian flow -
people just go where there's space.
Post by Bob Ward
Also, it seems that the normal flow in shopping
seems to be counter-clockwise - it feels more natural (to me, at
least) to turn right when entering a store to browse, then serpentine
through the store from one end to the other.
I can't remember which way it works, but retail psychologists
recommend that shops - at least the large ones - be laid out according
to our natural, subconscious inclination to turn in one direction
rather than the other. Of course, they don't do that to make it more
convenient, but to try to force us towards the produce.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
Hactar
2006-01-18 19:31:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Hatpin
Post by Bob Ward
Speaking of cultural differences, I'm curious - do the differences in
driving translate to pedestrian traffic as well? Over here, we tend
to keep to the right on the streets and on the sidewalks (pavement
there, I guess?)
Yes, "pavement" - "sidewalk" is never used.
I've not noticed any particular left/right thing in pedestrian flow -
people just go where there's space.
I have -- there's a (weak) tendency to walk on the right. Mind, there are
lots of people who just walk wherever, but I'd say 60%-70% stick to the
right in the mall, which is more than you'd expect by random chance.
Post by John Hatpin
Post by Bob Ward
Also, it seems that the normal flow in shopping
seems to be counter-clockwise - it feels more natural (to me, at
least) to turn right when entering a store to browse, then serpentine
through the store from one end to the other.
If you're on the RHS, a right turn is easier. This leads to a CCW path.
Post by John Hatpin
I can't remember which way it works, but retail psychologists
recommend that shops - at least the large ones - be laid out according
to our natural, subconscious inclination to turn in one direction
rather than the other. Of course, they don't do that to make it more
convenient, but to try to force us towards the produce.
When I have the choice of taking the passage to the left or a similar one
to the right, I always choose the left, as it's less crowded.
--
-eben ***@EtaRmpTabYayU.rIr.OcoPm home.tampabay.rr.com/hactar

Hi! I'm a .sig virus! Copy me to your .sig!
Tim Wright
2006-01-18 22:23:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hactar
Post by John Hatpin
Post by Bob Ward
Speaking of cultural differences, I'm curious - do the differences in
driving translate to pedestrian traffic as well? Over here, we tend
to keep to the right on the streets and on the sidewalks (pavement
there, I guess?)
Yes, "pavement" - "sidewalk" is never used.
I've not noticed any particular left/right thing in pedestrian flow -
people just go where there's space.
I have -- there's a (weak) tendency to walk on the right. Mind, there are
lots of people who just walk wherever, but I'd say 60%-70% stick to the
right in the mall, which is more than you'd expect by random chance.
Post by John Hatpin
Post by Bob Ward
Also, it seems that the normal flow in shopping
seems to be counter-clockwise - it feels more natural (to me, at
least) to turn right when entering a store to browse, then serpentine
through the store from one end to the other.
If you're on the RHS, a right turn is easier. This leads to a CCW path.
All right hand turns would lead to a CLOCKWISE path. A CCW path would
be left handed turns.
Post by Hactar
Post by John Hatpin
I can't remember which way it works, but retail psychologists
recommend that shops - at least the large ones - be laid out according
to our natural, subconscious inclination to turn in one direction
rather than the other. Of course, they don't do that to make it more
convenient, but to try to force us towards the produce.
When I have the choice of taking the passage to the left or a similar one
to the right, I always choose the left, as it's less crowded.
--
Tim W
This space available.
Hactar
2006-01-18 23:34:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim Wright
Post by Hactar
Post by Bob Ward
Also, it seems that the normal flow in shopping
seems to be counter-clockwise - it feels more natural (to me, at
least) to turn right when entering a store to browse, then serpentine
through the store from one end to the other.
If you're on the RHS, a right turn is easier. This leads to a CCW path.
All right hand turns would lead to a CLOCKWISE path. A CCW path would
be left handed turns.
*slaps forehead* Right. What I meant to say was that if you're on the
RHS, and follow the wall of products nearest you, you'll end up going CCW.
That is, assuming the products are all in one continuous path.
--
-eben ***@EtaRmpTabYayU.rIr.OcoPm home.tampabay.rr.com/hactar

Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and
I'm not sure about the former." - Albert Einstein
Tim Wright
2006-01-19 00:37:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hactar
Post by Tim Wright
Post by Hactar
Post by Bob Ward
Also, it seems that the normal flow in shopping
seems to be counter-clockwise - it feels more natural (to me, at
least) to turn right when entering a store to browse, then serpentine
through the store from one end to the other.
If you're on the RHS, a right turn is easier. This leads to a CCW path.
All right hand turns would lead to a CLOCKWISE path. A CCW path would
be left handed turns.
*slaps forehead* Right. What I meant to say was that if you're on the
RHS, and follow the wall of products nearest you, you'll end up going CCW.
That is, assuming the products are all in one continuous path.
I'll buy that. That's how guys navigate malls.
--
Tim W
This space available.
Bill Turlock
2006-01-18 22:03:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Ward
On Wed, 18 Jan 2006 03:25:36 +0000, John Hatpin
Post by John Hatpin
Post by Bob Ward
Did I miss something? I've not seen any way to tell Pandora to play a
particular genre directly - only by specifying songs or artists who
fit the style.
Yes, that's how I've done it. Just put into a channel the people who
play in a genre or sub-genre. For example, I have two channels
playing soul music - one has Tower of Power and Average White Band and
Stevie Wonder and so on, the other more of the late-night stuff like
Barry White and Donny Hathaway, which is more my wife's cup of tea.
Post by Bob Ward
I don't agree that you have to be a musician to enjoy jazz, any more
than you have to be a chef to enjoy fine food, or a brewer to enjoy
beer. How popular would football (or any sport, for that matter) be
if you had to know the mechanics behind it?
Since you and Bill Van have read that into it, it's obviously my
ill-chosen wording. I'm not saying that you have to be a musician to
enjoy jazz, just that I keep being surprised that non-musicians do so,
and regard that surprise as a quirk of my own past.
No harm, no foul - sometimes it helps to get some feedback to make
sure that cultural differences don't interfere with the meaning.
Speaking of cultural differences, I'm curious - do the differences in
driving translate to pedestrian traffic as well? Over here, we tend
to keep to the right on the streets and on the sidewalks (pavement
there, I guess?) Also, it seems that the normal flow in shopping
seems to be counter-clockwise - it feels more natural (to me, at
least) to turn right when entering a store to browse, then serpentine
through the store from one end to the other.
Huh?! Not in my world!
That's one of my pet peeves--the fact that we do have a standard, yet
IME no one follows it. I'm always bumping into people who, when there's
a choice, make the wrong one, and then there's alway someone who'll cut
a corner shot without regard for anyone who might be coming around the
corner, unseen.

Bill
unknown
2006-01-19 06:07:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Ward
do the differences in
driving translate to pedestrian traffic as well? Over here, we tend
to keep to the right on the streets and on the sidewalks
I've tried to pay some attention to this question when traveling in
drive-left countries. My unscientific observation is that Americans
tend to keep right rather noticeably, Western Europe and China a little
less markedly. In the left-drive countries I've visited (Australia, NZ,
Japan, UK), there seems to be no clear pattern to where people walk.
bill van
2006-01-19 06:26:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
Post by Bob Ward
do the differences in
driving translate to pedestrian traffic as well? Over here, we tend
to keep to the right on the streets and on the sidewalks
I've tried to pay some attention to this question when traveling in
drive-left countries. My unscientific observation is that Americans
tend to keep right rather noticeably, Western Europe and China a little
less markedly. In the left-drive countries I've visited (Australia, NZ,
Japan, UK), there seems to be no clear pattern to where people walk.
One of the subtle details of the Vancouver ethnic mix is that people who
grew up here -- including many of Asian descent -- walk on the right,
but some of the more recent arrivals, also of Asian descent, walk on the
left. Not sure if that's because some of them grew up driving left, or
whether walking on the left side of the sidewalk is something that
happens in some places regardless of whether people drive left.

bill

Bill Turlock
2006-01-18 03:38:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Hatpin
Post by E Brown
Post by Veronique
I played in orchestra (cello) as a sprout. I actually had a very good
friend who was a flutist and also played saxophone-- she tried and
tried (and on my part, I gave it my best open-mindedness) to help me
appreciate jazz. Never took. My conclusion was/is that jazz is more fun
to play than to listen too-- obviously, only my own opinion!
With which I agree. I can appreciate the skill displayed, but jazz
always strikes me as the musical equivalent of calligraphy: it can be
beautiful, it's perfect for some occasions, but fussy and
over-elaborate for the most part. I listen to everything else without
qualm (heck, I was listening to X's "The Hungry Wolf in the car today)
- jazz usually has me reaching for the dial.
Oddly enough, I almost completely agree with both of you, but love
jazz and play jazz piano. An hour ago, I told Pandora.com to play
jazz and right now, I'm listening to "Tropicana Nights" by Paquito
D'Rivera and it's excellent. Whoa, Nat Adderley's just come up.
"Tadd". Wow.
Anyway, yes, I'm far less surprised by both of your anti-jazz
sentiments than I am by meeting non-musicians who are heavily into
jazz. How can you get anything out of the music without understanding
what's put into it?
Okay, and music. My parents also gave me the gift of music.
Post by John Hatpin
For example, our lovely neighbour Annie loves jazz. She'll call round
and tell me about an album by Miles she's just bought, and I'll think
"why does she enjoy it"? I don't have the same thoughts about any
other musical style.
My WAG is it's because I came to jazz as a musician and continue to
view it through a musician's eyes, even when I'm just sitting
listening to it. It's quite strange and unreasonable, but that's how
it is.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
MWB
2006-01-16 04:28:40 UTC
Permalink
A set of drums and a bunch of kids.



Mark
Tony Myers (As seen near TV)
2006-01-16 04:36:22 UTC
Permalink
I don't give a damn about any trumpet playing band
M C Hamster
2006-01-16 04:37:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
Trumpets. Brass in general.
--
M C Hamster "Big Wheel Keep on Turnin'" -- Creedence Clearwater Revival
Bill Bonde ('Soli Deo Gloria')
2006-01-16 04:58:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
Squeaky violin.
--
"He named his second child Jim after the horse that had brought him to
Washington. He caught his son one day writing 'James' on his lessons,
and he told the boy without raising his voice that if he had wanted to
name him 'James', that is what he would have done." -+Edward P. Jones,
"The Known World"
Richard R. Hershberger
2006-01-16 14:40:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Bonde ('Soli Deo Gloria')
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
Squeaky violin.
And I thought I was the only one... Works for solo, or especially
unaccompanied, violin are often quite squeaky and annoying, even when
played Renouned Violinists. I had come to the conclusion that I just
didn't care for solo violin, when I attended a recital by Hilary Hahn.
(Yes, these aren't entirely consistent.) She did a chunk of one of
Bach's partitas, and it was absolutely gorgeous. And not at all
squeaky. So I don't know if the squeakiness is a conscious choice of
performance style, something that many violinists can't get rid of, or
what.

On a somewhat different topic, that of most interesting instrument
combinations, the Philadelphia mummers string band is a musical form[1]
based on saxophones and banjos, often with a glockenspiel thrown in and
sometimes with other optional instrument combinations. It is the only
place I have ever seen the marching double bass. If I could only
listen to one musical form, this wouldn't be it. But it is an
interesting way to spend New Year's Day.

Richard R. Hershberger

[1] Some would deny them this status.
Peter Ward
2006-01-16 17:09:43 UTC
Permalink
On 16 Jan 2006 06:40:11 -0800, "Richard R. Hershberger"
Post by Richard R. Hershberger
Post by Bill Bonde ('Soli Deo Gloria')
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
Squeaky violin.
And I thought I was the only one... Works for solo, or especially
unaccompanied, violin are often quite squeaky and annoying, even when
played Renouned Violinists.
Lark Ascending, for example, is a particularly unpleasant sounding
piece played on the violin.

I don't like solo violin, and detest string quartets due to the sound
(the music may well be superb, I won't be listening). I am not keen
on massed strings, either. However, I like a good fiddle[1]. There
is a world of difference between a violin and a fiddle, even when they
are one and the same instrument.

[1] Now, take that out of context.
--
Peter

I'm an alien

e-mail: groups at asylum dot nildram dot co dot uk
Bob Ward
2006-01-17 01:11:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Ward
On 16 Jan 2006 06:40:11 -0800, "Richard R. Hershberger"
Post by Richard R. Hershberger
Post by Bill Bonde ('Soli Deo Gloria')
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
Squeaky violin.
And I thought I was the only one... Works for solo, or especially
unaccompanied, violin are often quite squeaky and annoying, even when
played Renouned Violinists.
Lark Ascending, for example, is a particularly unpleasant sounding
piece played on the violin.
I don't like solo violin, and detest string quartets due to the sound
(the music may well be superb, I won't be listening). I am not keen
on massed strings, either. However, I like a good fiddle[1]. There
is a world of difference between a violin and a fiddle, even when they
are one and the same instrument.
[1] Now, take that out of context.
PBS (American Public Broadcast System) had a concert as one of their
fundraisers - Celtic Woman, featuring four soloists and an amazing
fiddle player. Go to www.celticwoman.com, enter the site, and click
on soundbites. For a better version that requires Macromedia Flash, go
to http://www.manhattanrecords.com/cwplayer/. If you like Celtic
Music, or good Irish fiddle music, this might appeal to you.
Peter Ward
2006-01-17 15:38:15 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 01:11:25 GMT, Bob Ward <***@email.com>
posted....

[snip snip snip]
Post by Bob Ward
PBS (American Public Broadcast System) had a concert as one of their
fundraisers - Celtic Woman, featuring four soloists and an amazing
fiddle player. Go to www.celticwoman.com, enter the site, and click
on soundbites. For a better version that requires Macromedia Flash, go
to http://www.manhattanrecords.com/cwplayer/. If you like Celtic
Music, or good Irish fiddle music, this might appeal to you.
Noted, thanks.
--
Peter

I'm an alien

e-mail: groups at asylum dot nildram dot co dot uk
John Hatpin
2006-01-16 05:40:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
I was about to reply that I don't like the sound of amplified,
distorted feedback guitar, but then remembered the joy I've had
listening to Carlos Santana and Frank Zappa and so on.

So, my reply: amplified, distorted feedback guitar, unless it's played
by someone anything like Santana or Zappa.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
Tony Myers (As seen near TV)
2006-01-16 06:52:35 UTC
Permalink
wait, do dental instruments count?
Bill Turlock
2006-01-16 07:24:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Myers (As seen near TV)
wait, do dental instruments count?
just the wazzoo
Thomas Canty
2006-01-16 08:55:45 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 19:41:06 -0800, Bill Turlock <"Bill
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
Any instrument that's played badly. As long as the musician playing it
knows what they're doing, I can't think of any instrument in
particular that I don't like.
Charles Wm. Dimmick
2006-01-16 12:49:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
My four favourite instruments are harp, cello, flute, and oboe.
After that come violin and organ.
My least favourite is that thing drummers do with that funny
whisk broom.

Charles
Glenn Dowdy
2006-01-17 19:13:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles Wm. Dimmick
My least favourite is that thing drummers do with that funny
whisk broom.
"brushes"

http://www.vater.com/newproducts/brushes_specialty.cfm

What don't you like about them?

Glenn D.
Charles Wm. Dimmick
2006-01-17 19:23:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Glenn Dowdy
Post by Charles Wm. Dimmick
My least favourite is that thing drummers do with that funny
whisk broom.
"brushes"
http://www.vater.com/newproducts/brushes_specialty.cfm
What don't you like about them?
I find the sound distracting. It [in my opinion] takes
away from the sound of the music.

Charles
TedTheCat
2006-01-18 01:32:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles Wm. Dimmick
My four favourite instruments are harp, cello, flute, and oboe.
After that come violin and organ.
Cowbell. I can't get enough cowbell. I've got a fever and the only
prescription is more cowbell.
h***@gmail.com
2006-01-18 01:45:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by TedTheCat
Post by Charles Wm. Dimmick
My four favourite instruments are harp, cello, flute, and oboe.
After that come violin and organ.
Cowbell. I can't get enough cowbell. I've got a fever and the only
prescription is more cowbell.
It's time to get America back on track.

http://www.walken2008.com/index.html
--
Huey
TedTheCat
2006-01-18 23:45:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by TedTheCat
Post by Charles Wm. Dimmick
My four favourite instruments are harp, cello, flute, and oboe.
After that come violin and organ.
Cowbell. I can't get enough cowbell. I've got a fever and the only
prescription is more cowbell.
It's time to get America back on track.
http://www.walken2008.com/index.html
"Peace, Prosperity and More Cowbell"

Thanks for the link.
Dana Carpender
2006-01-18 23:55:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by TedTheCat
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by TedTheCat
Post by Charles Wm. Dimmick
My four favourite instruments are harp, cello, flute, and oboe.
After that come violin and organ.
Cowbell. I can't get enough cowbell. I've got a fever and the only
prescription is more cowbell.
It's time to get America back on track.
http://www.walken2008.com/index.html
"Peace, Prosperity and More Cowbell"
Thanks for the link.
He can't be serious, or he'd have picked better photos.

Dana
Alistair Gale
2006-01-19 00:32:57 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 18 Jan 2006 23:55:13 GMT, Dana Carpender
Post by Dana Carpender
Post by TedTheCat
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by TedTheCat
Post by Charles Wm. Dimmick
My four favourite instruments are harp, cello, flute, and oboe.
After that come violin and organ.
Cowbell. I can't get enough cowbell. I've got a fever and the only
prescription is more cowbell.
It's time to get America back on track.
http://www.walken2008.com/index.html
"Peace, Prosperity and More Cowbell"
Thanks for the link.
He can't be serious, or he'd have picked better photos.
He puts his pants on just like the rest of you - one leg at a time.
Except, once his pants are on, he makes gold records!
--
alistair
Xt' Tapalatakettle
2006-01-19 03:51:01 UTC
Permalink
The Electric Triangle

Umm, Band name!
--
Xt' Tapalatakettle
Now with 30% more subliminal messages.
Jim Shaffer
2006-01-16 22:16:30 UTC
Permalink
I suppose it's because of hearing too many poor public school ones,
but I can't stand marching bands.
bill van
2006-01-16 22:53:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Shaffer
I suppose it's because of hearing too many poor public school ones,
but I can't stand marching bands.
And it's even harder to make them sit.
Bill Bonde ('Soli Deo Gloria')
2006-01-16 23:23:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Shaffer
I suppose it's because of hearing too many poor public school ones,
but I can't stand marching bands.
Even those playing on TV for major bowl games are difficult to follow, I
think. I'm going, I know that song from somewhere, hi ho, it's some kind
of Jingle Bells!
--
"He named his second child Jim after the horse that had brought him to
Washington. He caught his son one day writing 'James' on his lessons,
and he told the boy without raising his voice that if he had wanted to
name him 'James', that is what he would have done." -+Edward P. Jones,
"The Known World"
John Hatpin
2006-01-16 23:29:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Shaffer
I suppose it's because of hearing too many poor public school ones,
but I can't stand marching bands.
As an ex-trumpet player (yes, I played ex-trumpet), I can understand
that. It's damned hard to play a brass instrument while you're
walking around, legs moving and stuff, in variable temperatures, with
your sheet music clipped to some silly little stand stuck onto your
instrument.

Plus, the music they write for marching bands is really crap. I mean,
it's absolutely awful. Sousa was just the best of a very bad bunch,
and even he wasn't exactly Mozart, y'know?

I'm sometimes astounded by how very bad army marching bands are.
You'd think they'd be pretty skilled, in the same way gunners or
infantrymen or tank-drivers can do their stuff, but it doesn't seem to
apply to music.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
Bill Bonde ('Soli Deo Gloria')
2006-01-16 23:36:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Hatpin
Post by Jim Shaffer
I suppose it's because of hearing too many poor public school ones,
but I can't stand marching bands.
As an ex-trumpet player (yes, I played ex-trumpet), I can understand
that. It's damned hard to play a brass instrument while you're
walking around, legs moving and stuff, in variable temperatures, with
your sheet music clipped to some silly little stand stuck onto your
instrument.
Stringed instruments would be worse, dragging around your cello leaving
an ugly groove in the astroturf.
Post by John Hatpin
Plus, the music they write for marching bands is really crap. I mean,
it's absolutely awful. Sousa was just the best of a very bad bunch,
and even he wasn't exactly Mozart, y'know?
What tends to work well is percussion.
--
"He named his second child Jim after the horse that had brought him to
Washington. He caught his son one day writing 'James' on his lessons,
and he told the boy without raising his voice that if he had wanted to
name him 'James', that is what he would have done." -+Edward P. Jones,
"The Known World"
mike muth
2006-01-17 17:22:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Hatpin
Plus, the music they write for marching bands is really crap. I mean,
it's absolutely awful. Sousa was just the best of a very bad bunch,
and even he wasn't exactly Mozart, y'know?
I have sheet music lying about* for arrangements by composers who might
surprise you -Handel, Haydn, Liszt, Beethoven, Strauss.

(*Well, filed away in a cabinet about 160 miles from here.)

Beethoven did arrangements for 25 Scottish songs, including Highland
Laddie (which I've also heard used as Christmas music).

IMHO, the best march music is simple, arranged for a relatively small
number of instruments, and not played by a school band.

Mike
stuthehistoryguy/Arminius
2006-01-16 22:21:00 UTC
Permalink
I still have nightmares about dulcimers. Oh, the humanity!
Robert Crowe
2006-01-18 21:34:24 UTC
Permalink
On 16 Jan 2006 14:21:00 -0800, the alleged stuthehistoryguy/Arminius,
Post by stuthehistoryguy/Arminius
I still have nightmares about dulcimers. Oh, the humanity!
Which type, mountain or hammered?

I've a 15/14, quad strung, of the hammered type, and am wanting a 19/18.
However it'll cost me about *three FSCKing thousand dollars!!!1!1!!*.

...and what's so nightmarish about <http://tinyurl.com/7qrno>[1], other
than the electric guitar part?

Regards,
Rob

[1] <http://www.realhickorywind.com/Morrison's%20Jig.mp3>
--
"Using Windows in place of a real operating system is like bringing
a knife to a tactical nuclear exchange."

-- James Riden in the Scary Devil Monastery
Charles Wm. Dimmick
2006-01-18 23:51:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Crowe
On 16 Jan 2006 14:21:00 -0800, the alleged stuthehistoryguy/Arminius,
Post by stuthehistoryguy/Arminius
I still have nightmares about dulcimers. Oh, the humanity!
Which type, mountain or hammered?
I've a 15/14, quad strung, of the hammered type, and am wanting a 19/18.
However it'll cost me about *three FSCKing thousand dollars!!!1!1!!*.
My brother George has a hammered dulcimer, somewhat similar to
a zither, that came over from Germany sometime in the 19th.
century. I haven't seen it in years, so don't know how many
strings it has. However, 15/14 sounds about right.

Charles
John Hatpin
2006-01-19 01:07:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles Wm. Dimmick
My brother George has a hammered dulcimer
ObSpikeJones: "Oh, I just can't carry on without my brother George!"
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
Boron Elgar
2006-01-19 01:42:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Crowe
On 16 Jan 2006 14:21:00 -0800, the alleged stuthehistoryguy/Arminius,
Post by stuthehistoryguy/Arminius
I still have nightmares about dulcimers. Oh, the humanity!
Which type, mountain or hammered?
I've a 15/14, quad strung, of the hammered type, and am wanting a 19/18.
However it'll cost me about *three FSCKing thousand dollars!!!1!1!!*.
I have a Folkcraft 16/15 sitting here with an incredible handcarved
stand if you 're buying.....it's mighty purty....but only double
strung.

Boron
stuthehistoryguy/Arminius
2006-01-16 22:21:06 UTC
Permalink
I still have nightmares about dulcimers. Oh, the humanity!
Lord Jubjub
2006-01-17 00:28:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
Bill
accordian for the most part
Peter Boulding
2006-01-17 16:05:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Turlock
What's yers?
Favourite: guitars - of all kinds, most definitely including the Kind Hated
By Hatpin.

Least favourite: stylophone.
--
Regards
Peter Boulding
***@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk (to e-mail, remove "UNSPAM")
Fractal music & images: http://www.pboulding.co.uk/
Hactar
2006-01-17 18:28:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Boulding
Post by Bill Turlock
What's yers?
Favourite: guitars - of all kinds, most definitely including the Kind Hated
By Hatpin.
Least favourite: stylophone.
WTF's a stylophone -- someone who talks about fashion?
--
-eben ***@EtaRmpTabYayU.rIr.OcoPm home.tampabay.rr.com/hactar
SAGITTARIUS: All your friends are laughing behind your back... kill
them. Take down all those naked pictures of Ernest Borgnine you've got
hanging in your den. -- Weird Al, _Your Horoscope for Today_
Peter Boulding
2006-01-17 18:54:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hactar
WTF's a stylophone -- someone who talks about fashion?
If only.

The Stylophone was a small and very crude one-note-at-a-time synthesizer,
popular as a child's toy instrument in the 1970s (and plugged in the UK by
Rolf Harris) that you played by completing circuits by touching a metal
"stylus" to one of a small number of metal keys. Millions of the bloody
things were sold.

A 1.9MB mp3 version of They Might Be Giants' "Particle Man" - featuring a
Stylophone - can be downloaded from
<http://www.tmbw.net/mp3/They%20Might%20Be%20Giants%20-%20Particle%20Man%20(Stylophone).mp3>.

Given the nature of the instrument, the Stylophone player on the above track
displays considerable virtuosity, but in providing the above link I accept
no responsibility whatever for its effect on the sanity or emotional
wellbeing of anyone who possesses even the faintest degree of musical
sensitivity.
--
Regards
Peter Boulding
***@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk (to e-mail, remove "UNSPAM")
Fractal music & images: http://www.pboulding.co.uk/
John Hatpin
2006-01-17 22:03:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Boulding
The Stylophone was a small and very crude one-note-at-a-time synthesizer,
popular as a child's toy instrument in the 1970s (and plugged in the UK by
Rolf Harris) that you played by completing circuits by touching a metal
"stylus" to one of a small number of metal keys. Millions of the bloody
things were sold.
And, for the music geeks among us, it used a plain, unfiltered square
wave to generate its beautiful tones. In other words, it buzzed.

But it was cheap, and it was the best of the class until Casio
released those little white mini-synths in, what, 1980 or so? They
were fun: a sequencer and ADSR control built-in, plus an actual sort
of keyboard thing and a selection of tawdry rhythms. I have one
somewhere.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
Bill Turlock
2006-01-18 03:51:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Hatpin
Post by Peter Boulding
The Stylophone was a small and very crude one-note-at-a-time synthesizer,
popular as a child's toy instrument in the 1970s (and plugged in the UK by
Rolf Harris) that you played by completing circuits by touching a metal
"stylus" to one of a small number of metal keys. Millions of the bloody
things were sold.
And, for the music geeks among us, it used a plain, unfiltered square
wave to generate its beautiful tones. In other words, it buzzed.
But it was cheap, and it was the best of the class until Casio
released those little white mini-synths in, what, 1980 or so? They
were fun: a sequencer and ADSR control built-in, plus an actual sort
of keyboard thing and a selection of tawdry rhythms. I have one
somewhere.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
I bought one of those for myself for Christmas, '86. Took it home, put a
roast of beef in the oven, then started doodling with the kbd. Looked up
15 minutes later (subjective time) to discover that the roast was done.
I don't often use the opposite side of my brain. I can't get my
intellect of of the way when I'm trying to do music, I guess I
understand why some musicians are fond of herbal substances, etc.

Bill
John Hatpin
2006-01-18 04:50:35 UTC
Permalink
[...]
Post by Bill Turlock
Post by John Hatpin
But it was cheap, and it was the best of the class until Casio
released those little white mini-synths in, what, 1980 or so? They
were fun: a sequencer and ADSR control built-in, plus an actual sort
of keyboard thing and a selection of tawdry rhythms. I have one
somewhere.
I bought one of those for myself for Christmas, '86. Took it home, put a
roast of beef in the oven, then started doodling with the kbd. Looked up
15 minutes later (subjective time) to discover that the roast was done.
I don't often use the opposite side of my brain. I can't get my
intellect of of the way when I'm trying to do music, I guess I
understand why some musicians are fond of herbal substances, etc.
It's incredible how quickly time passes when you're getting into
playing music. Unless you're forced by circumstances to play bad
music, in which case it drags amazingly. I feel sorry for drummers,
who *have* to remove their watches in order to play properly (never
really needed to do that for keyboards, but did because it just felt
better).

As for the side-of-the-brain thing, it's something you acquire with
practice. At first, you're thinking about every damned thing you do,
then you learn not to think, and it suddenly gets better.

Enduring memory: as a fledgeling jazz pianist, getting up on stage at
this pub on jazz night:

Loading Image...

Suddenly, I realised that, instead of viewing the piano keyboard as
being composed of notes such as A, C#, Bb and so on, I could view it
as something like a blank canvas, stretching from one end of the
keyboard to the other. That was a case of discarding logical,
analytical, intellectual thought, and replacing it with a relaxed
feeling of complete control and freedom. An epiphany, that was.

From that day on, I allowed my brain to control my fingers
subconsciously (it actually feels as if your fingers are thinking for
themselves, a common analogy), freeing my conscious brain for more of
a kind of strategic role, and I became what I'd describe as a "proper"
player.

The psychology of musicianship is intruiging, and I think you're
right to make the connection with "herbal substances". They help to
free your mind from intellectual considerations, and hence in some
ways, can greatly improve your playing. In the right dosage, they
don't make you stupid or slow or anything, just give you freedom to
explore your subconscious and interpret your feelings through your
instrument without hindrance.

Times like this, I miss the cannabis. I haven't smoked it for many
years now, and probably couldn't handle it if I tried.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
bill van
2006-01-18 05:51:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Hatpin
Times like this, I miss the cannabis. I haven't smoked it for many
years now, and probably couldn't handle it if I tried.
Not to counsel you to do anything illegal, but I'm close to someone who
uses it medicinally to relieve some of the symptoms of an awful illness,
and once or twice a month I'll join her and we'll enjoy a malt, listen
to some good music, and talk. It still opens up some mental pathways and
can be quite enjoyable, especially with the music.

The main thing to keep in mind is that today's herb is many times more
powerful than the stuff we smoked many years ago, and to limit your
intake accordingly. Like by 90 per cent or so. Not smoking it at all is
of course a viable option.

bill
John Hatpin
2006-01-18 17:15:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by John Hatpin
Times like this, I miss the cannabis. I haven't smoked it for many
years now, and probably couldn't handle it if I tried.
Not to counsel you to do anything illegal, but I'm close to someone who
uses it medicinally to relieve some of the symptoms of an awful illness,
and once or twice a month I'll join her and we'll enjoy a malt, listen
to some good music, and talk. It still opens up some mental pathways and
can be quite enjoyable, especially with the music.
The main thing to keep in mind is that today's herb is many times more
powerful than the stuff we smoked many years ago, and to limit your
intake accordingly. Like by 90 per cent or so. Not smoking it at all is
of course a viable option.
The main reason I don't smoke cannabis any more is because it
exacerbates my anxiety/panic condition. It may even have been a
partial cause of it.
--
John Hatpin, in the kitchen, with the laptop.
Dover Beach
2006-01-18 18:35:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by John Hatpin
Times like this, I miss the cannabis. I haven't smoked it for many
years now, and probably couldn't handle it if I tried.
Not to counsel you to do anything illegal, but I'm close to someone
who uses it medicinally to relieve some of the symptoms of an awful
illness, and once or twice a month I'll join her and we'll enjoy a
malt, listen to some good music, and talk. It still opens up some
mental pathways and can be quite enjoyable, especially with the music.
The main thing to keep in mind is that today's herb is many times more
powerful than the stuff we smoked many years ago, and to limit your
intake accordingly. Like by 90 per cent or so. Not smoking it at all
is of course a viable option.
I've seen that claim challenged. Slate did an article a few years ago:

"The Myth of Potent Pot

The drug czar's latest reefer madness: He claims that marijuana is 30
times more powerful than it used to be."

http://www.slate.com/id/2074151/
--
Dover
bill van
2006-01-19 02:04:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dover Beach
Post by bill van
Post by John Hatpin
Times like this, I miss the cannabis. I haven't smoked it for many
years now, and probably couldn't handle it if I tried.
Not to counsel you to do anything illegal, but I'm close to someone
who uses it medicinally to relieve some of the symptoms of an awful
illness, and once or twice a month I'll join her and we'll enjoy a
malt, listen to some good music, and talk. It still opens up some
mental pathways and can be quite enjoyable, especially with the music.
The main thing to keep in mind is that today's herb is many times more
powerful than the stuff we smoked many years ago, and to limit your
intake accordingly. Like by 90 per cent or so. Not smoking it at all
is of course a viable option.
"The Myth of Potent Pot
The drug czar's latest reefer madness: He claims that marijuana is 30
times more powerful than it used to be."
http://www.slate.com/id/2074151/
Kind of straw-mannish. Your cite knocks down an anti-drug campaigner's
claim about pot being dangerous because it is 30 times stronger now. My
statement was that today's pot is much stronger than it used to be --
which is upheld by the knock-down article -- and that if John was to
smoke any now (which he apparently does not intend to do), he should try
a much smaller quantity than he used to smoke, which is also supported
in the knock-down article. It says kids today are not getting more
stoned because they are smoking less at a time.

You can certainly quibble about the numbers. I can't prove that pot is x
times stronger than it used to be. But I have smoked it in the 1960s,
70s, 80s, 90s and a couple of weeks ago. My experience is that it is
much stronger than it used to be, by and large, and where I used to
smoke as much as a fat joint to get off, now it takes me three or four
tokes -- a fraction of a thin joint -- to get to where I'm going.

bill
Dover Beach
2006-01-19 02:15:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by Dover Beach
Post by bill van
Post by John Hatpin
Times like this, I miss the cannabis. I haven't smoked it for
many years now, and probably couldn't handle it if I tried.
Not to counsel you to do anything illegal, but I'm close to someone
who uses it medicinally to relieve some of the symptoms of an awful
illness, and once or twice a month I'll join her and we'll enjoy a
malt, listen to some good music, and talk. It still opens up some
mental pathways and can be quite enjoyable, especially with the music.
The main thing to keep in mind is that today's herb is many times
more powerful than the stuff we smoked many years ago, and to limit
your intake accordingly. Like by 90 per cent or so. Not smoking it
at all is of course a viable option.
"The Myth of Potent Pot
The drug czar's latest reefer madness: He claims that marijuana is 30
times more powerful than it used to be."
http://www.slate.com/id/2074151/
Kind of straw-mannish. Your cite knocks down an anti-drug campaigner's
claim about pot being dangerous because it is 30 times stronger now.
My statement was that today's pot is much stronger than it used to be
-- which is upheld by the knock-down article -- and that if John was
to smoke any now (which he apparently does not intend to do), he
should try a much smaller quantity than he used to smoke, which is
also supported in the knock-down article. It says kids today are not
getting more stoned because they are smoking less at a time.
You can certainly quibble about the numbers. I can't prove that pot is
x times stronger than it used to be. But I have smoked it in the
1960s, 70s, 80s, 90s and a couple of weeks ago. My experience is that
it is much stronger than it used to be, by and large, and where I used
to smoke as much as a fat joint to get off, now it takes me three or
four tokes -- a fraction of a thin joint -- to get to where I'm going.
bill
okeydokey. I agree the article was basically saying, "it's not THAT
much stronger, it's just stronger." I think the last time I looked into
the subject was about 1986, and per usual I got sick and then fell
asleep. Ever the fun date.
--
Dover
bill van
2006-01-19 04:58:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dover Beach
okeydokey. I agree the article was basically saying, "it's not THAT
much stronger, it's just stronger." I think the last time I looked into
the subject was about 1986, and per usual I got sick and then fell
asleep. Ever the fun date.
Too bad, but no disaster. I've never been one of those folks who thought
everybody ought to smoke dope to make the universe a better place.

My reaction to non-stupefying doses [1] has generally been to become
more animated and engage in word and concept play, which can be fun if
others are in the same mood.

bill

[1] Once when hot-knifing hash oil, otoh, I was struck dumb and unable
to move from my spot for two or three hours. That was less fun. But it
happened around 35 years ago and I got over it.
John Hatpin
2006-01-19 05:05:27 UTC
Permalink
Dover Beach wrote:

[cannabis/marijuana]
Post by Dover Beach
okeydokey. I agree the article was basically saying, "it's not THAT
much stronger, it's just stronger." I think the last time I looked into
the subject was about 1986, and per usual I got sick and then fell
asleep. Ever the fun date.
I'll bet you're a truly fun date, but then I don't judge dates by
their ability to handle drugs. Or alcohol or tobacco, for that matter
(as if they're not drugs too).

Of course, now I'm married, and am a committed monogamist, that's a
moot point.
groo
2006-01-18 20:25:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Turlock
What's yers?
I dislike virtually all accordion music. I can tolerate bagpipes only at a
great distance. I once had the misfortune of walking through the area at a
bagpipe competition where all of the various groups were warming up. It
sounded as if every cat on earth was having its tail pulled.
--
"My folks deny it, but I'm pretty sure I spent the night duct-taped to the
fridge once. It was warm and had a soothing hum." - Xho on afca
Hactar
2006-01-18 23:18:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by groo
Post by Bill Turlock
What's yers?
I dislike virtually all accordion music.
My sister plays in an accordion-banjo duo. They actually get gigs.
--
-eben ***@EtaRmpTabYayU.rIr.OcoPm home.tampabay.rr.com/hactar

Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and
I'm not sure about the former." - Albert Einstein
Bob Ward
2006-01-19 06:09:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hactar
Post by groo
Post by Bill Turlock
What's yers?
I dislike virtually all accordion music.
My sister plays in an accordion-banjo duo. They actually get gigs.
Definition of the most deluded person in thje world: A banjo player
with a beeper...
TedTheCat
2006-01-18 23:51:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
I don't care for the diddley bow, but I do like Bo Diddley.
TedTheCat
2006-01-18 23:51:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Turlock
Some pundit, I forget who, a long time ago, opined that he hated the
sound of the piano. Me, if you asked me to name my favorite, or even my
_least_ favorite synphony orchestra instrument, I couldn't. I like 'em
all just as good. They're all part of the whole, and the whole is a good
thing. If I could play a stringed instrument it'd be the 'cello, though.
But anyway, the other day I heard some composition for two pianos, four
hands. Thinking back to whatever guy it was who said he didn't like the
piano, I suddenly flashed on the fact that, for me, one piano is enough.
I don't like the sound of two pianos, it's annoying.
What's yers?
I don't care for the diddley bow, but I do like Bo Diddley.
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