Discussion:
is ether still used?
(too old to reply)
Jake Blues
2007-06-15 03:15:52 UTC
Permalink
When I was a very young kid, I remember going into surgery, and having that
rubber mask placed over my face with ether being pumped through it. Either
they didn't give me enough pre-op tranquilizer or something, but I was fully
aware of what was going on. I remember crying, and desperately trying to get
my head away from that awful smell, and wondering why these friendly adults
kept pushing my face back into the mask. Anyone who has smelled ether can
relate. There are very few events in my life I could classify as traumatic,
but that was one of them. Even today, when someone opens a bottle of any
type of ether, or fingernail polish remover, or some types of alcohol ----
BAM! flashback.

Conversely, I had a surgery about 20 years ago. I was maybe 13 at the time,
and I asked my anesthetist if he was planning on giving me that damn ether.
He was taken aback. "Ether?! That stuff'll kill you!," he said. He hooked up
an IV, injected sodium pentethal, a standard preop barbiturate, and it
worked jjust fine.

But how often is ether used now? It's a very dangerous substance to work
with, easy to overdose the patient.
Not Sure
2007-06-15 03:51:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jake Blues
When I was a very young kid, I remember going into surgery, and
having that rubber mask placed over my face with ether being pumped
through it. Either they didn't give me enough pre-op tranquilizer or
something, but I was fully aware of what was going on. I remember
crying, and desperately trying to get my head away from that awful
smell, and wondering why these friendly adults kept pushing my face
back into the mask. Anyone who has smelled ether can relate. There
are very few events in my life I could classify as traumatic, but
that was one of them. Even today, when someone opens a bottle of any
type of ether, or fingernail polish remover, or some types of alcohol
---- BAM! flashback.
Conversely, I had a surgery about 20 years ago. I was maybe 13 at the
time, and I asked my anesthetist if he was planning on giving me that
damn ether. He was taken aback. "Ether?! That stuff'll kill you!," he
said. He hooked up an IV, injected sodium pentethal, a standard preop
barbiturate, and it worked jjust fine.
But how often is ether used now? It's a very dangerous substance to
work with, easy to overdose the patient.
Ask the Ether Bunny.
--
Iam Notsure
a***@yahoo.com
2007-06-15 14:24:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Not Sure
Post by Jake Blues
When I was a very young kid, I remember going into surgery, and
having that rubber mask placed over my face with ether being pumped
through it. Either they didn't give me enough pre-op tranquilizer or
something, but I was fully aware of what was going on. I remember
crying, and desperately trying to get my head away from that awful
smell, and wondering why these friendly adults kept pushing my face
back into the mask. Anyone who has smelled ether can relate. There
are very few events in my life I could classify as traumatic, but
that was one of them. Even today, when someone opens a bottle of any
type of ether, or fingernail polish remover, or some types of alcohol
---- BAM! flashback.
Conversely, I had a surgery about 20 years ago. I was maybe 13 at the
time, and I asked my anesthetist if he was planning on giving me that
damn ether. He was taken aback. "Ether?! That stuff'll kill you!," he
said. He hooked up an IV, injected sodium pentethal, a standard preop
barbiturate, and it worked jjust fine.
But how often is ether used now? It's a very dangerous substance to
work with, easy to overdose the patient.
Ask the Ether Bunny.
In the operating room at my local hospital, there was a sign on a door
that said
"Etherized employees only"
Walter Traprock
2007-06-15 06:49:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jake Blues
When I was a very young kid, I remember going into surgery, and having that
rubber mask placed over my face with ether being pumped through it. Either
they didn't give me enough pre-op tranquilizer or something, but I was fully
aware of what was going on. I remember crying, and desperately trying to get
my head away from that awful smell, and wondering why these friendly adults
kept pushing my face back into the mask. Anyone who has smelled ether can
relate. There are very few events in my life I could classify as traumatic,
but that was one of them. Even today, when someone opens a bottle of any
type of ether, or fingernail polish remover, or some types of alcohol ----
BAM! flashback.
Conversely, I had a surgery about 20 years ago. I was maybe 13 at the time,
and I asked my anesthetist if he was planning on giving me that damn ether.
He was taken aback. "Ether?! That stuff'll kill you!," he said. He hooked up
an IV, injected sodium pentethal, a standard preop barbiturate, and it
worked jjust fine.
But how often is ether used now? It's a very dangerous substance to work
with, easy to overdose the patient.
Don't get ether and chloroform confused, each is considered very
dangerous for different reasons, overdosing for chloroform, and
fire hazard for ether. Chloroform supposedly smells better than
ether, which means ether must really smell bad as I hate the smell
of chloroform. If ether is anything like chloroform or nitrous
oxide, than there's no point in me trying it as the above substances
are incapable of producing a pleasurable effect in me, just like pot,
a common condition, I suspect.

Oh, about anethesia, nitrous is an aid to stuff put in your arm,
perhaps, but isn't all that funny.
Cheetah
2007-06-15 19:21:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jake Blues
When I was a very young kid, I remember going into surgery, and
having that rubber mask placed over my face with ether being pumped
through it. Either they didn't give me enough pre-op tranquilizer or
something, but I was fully aware of what was going on. I remember
crying, and desperately trying to get my head away from that awful
smell, and wondering why these friendly adults kept pushing my face
back into the mask. Anyone who has smelled ether can relate. There
are very few events in my life I could classify as traumatic, but
that was one of them. Even today, when someone opens a bottle of any
type of ether, or fingernail polish remover, or some types of alcohol
---- BAM! flashback.
I had ether in 1946 when I had my tonsils out. I remember it well
because it was bad. I had terrible nightmares while under the influence.

They gave me ether again in 1959 when I was in labor and the doctor
wasn't there yet to deliver my child. This time, it was only whiffs to
ease the pangs and prevent the birth.

Since then I have always asked before surgery if they were planning to
give me ether, and, basically, the answer is always "No, we don't use
that anymore."

HTH,

--
Cheetah
Post by Jake Blues
Conversely, I had a surgery about 20 years ago. I was maybe 13 at the
time, and I asked my anesthetist if he was planning on giving me that
damn ether. He was taken aback. "Ether?! That stuff'll kill you!," he
said. He hooked up an IV, injected sodium pentethal, a standard preop
barbiturate, and it worked jjust fine.
But how often is ether used now? It's a very dangerous substance to
work with, easy to overdose the patient.
Blinky the Shark
2007-06-15 22:24:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheetah
I had ether in 1946 when I had my tonsils out. I remember it well
because it was bad. I had terrible nightmares while under the influence.
They gave me ether again in 1959 when I was in labor and the doctor
wasn't there yet to deliver my child. This time, it was only whiffs to
ease the pangs and prevent the birth.
Since then I have always asked before surgery if they were planning to
give me ether, and, basically, the answer is always "No, we don't use
that anymore."
...and stuff you full of laudanum.
--
Blinky RLU 297263
Killing all posts from Google Groups
The Usenet Improvement Project: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
Bill Turlock
2007-06-15 23:05:49 UTC
Permalink
Sure, in the net.


Bill "I can't believe it took so long!" Turlock
Jake Blues
2007-06-16 00:21:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Turlock
Sure, in the net.
Bill "I can't believe it took so long!" Turlock
Ethernet? I read the wikipedia article about it. I could keep up with some
of it, but not all. I guess the key to understanding it is study, study,
study, like anything else. If you know enough about this stuff, you could
land a high-paying job as a computer tech or programmer. Surely that's one
market that isn't flooded, -- yet.
Rich Clancey
2007-06-16 10:29:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jake Blues
But how often is ether used now? It's a very dangerous substance to work
with, easy to overdose the patient.
A couple of years ago at Mass General Hospital, where ether
was first used, somebody opened a closet which hadn't been opened in
something like a century. In it they found boxes of what they figure
was the original batch of ether. It was stored in glass bottles
sealed with wax. The thought of bringing ether anywhere near the
temperature of melted wax is pretty frightening.
--
rich clancey ***@bahleevyoome.world.std.com
"Shun those who deny we have eyes in order to see, and instead say we
see because we happen to have eyes." -- Leibniz
x***@gmail.com
2007-06-16 20:25:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich Clancey
Post by Jake Blues
But how often is ether used now? It's a very dangerous substance to work
with, easy to overdose the patient.
A couple of years ago at Mass General Hospital, where ether
was first used, somebody opened a closet which hadn't been opened in
something like a century. In it they found boxes of what they figure
was the original batch of ether. It was stored in glass bottles
sealed with wax. The thought of bringing ether anywhere near the
temperature of melted wax is pretty frightening.
I wouldn't want to immerse the whole bottle in a molten wax bath, but just
sealing the neck wouldn't bother me much. But the thought of the peroxide
risks involved in 160 year old bottles of ether makes me shudder.

Xho
--
-------------------- http://NewsReader.Com/ --------------------
Usenet Newsgroup Service $9.95/Month 30GB
Greg Goss
2007-06-16 21:12:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich Clancey
Post by Jake Blues
But how often is ether used now? It's a very dangerous substance to work
with, easy to overdose the patient.
A couple of years ago at Mass General Hospital, where ether
was first used, somebody opened a closet which hadn't been opened in
something like a century. In it they found boxes of what they figure
was the original batch of ether. It was stored in glass bottles
sealed with wax. The thought of bringing ether anywhere near the
temperature of melted wax is pretty frightening.
My roommate and I went out with a couple of cans of ether offering to
help stranded motorists start their cars in -44 degree temperatures.
I backed out from his idea after we successfully put out the fire that
we set in one customer's car.

At least I think that the "starting fluid" was ether. It's been a
very long time since 1979.
--
Tomorrow is today already.
Greg Goss, 1989-01-27
Hactar
2007-06-17 01:08:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Rich Clancey
Post by Jake Blues
But how often is ether used now? It's a very dangerous substance to work
with, easy to overdose the patient.
A couple of years ago at Mass General Hospital, where ether
was first used, somebody opened a closet which hadn't been opened in
something like a century. In it they found boxes of what they figure
was the original batch of ether. It was stored in glass bottles
sealed with wax. The thought of bringing ether anywhere near the
temperature of melted wax is pretty frightening.
My roommate and I went out with a couple of cans of ether offering to
help stranded motorists start their cars in -44 degree temperatures.
I backed out from his idea after we successfully put out the fire that
we set in one customer's car.
At least I think that the "starting fluid" was ether. It's been a
very long time since 1979.
I believe it still is.
--
-eben ***@vTerYizUonI.nOetP
1101000 1110100 1110100 1110000 0111010 0101111 0101111 1110010 1101111
1111001 1100001 1101100 1110100 1111001 0101110 1101101 1101001 1101110
1100101 0101110 1101110 1110101 0111010 0111000 0110001 0101111
r***@bestweb.net
2007-06-16 12:45:48 UTC
Permalink
For anesthetizing humans, sure, gases are still used plenty, and
ether's probably still the most popular of anesthetic gases. Short of
killing you from an OD or exploding, about its only side effect is a
sore throat.

Robert
Walter Traprock
2007-06-16 17:35:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by r***@bestweb.net
For anesthetizing humans, sure, gases are still used plenty, and
ether's probably still the most popular of anesthetic gases. Short of
killing you from an OD or exploding, about its only side effect is a
sore throat.
Ether boils at something like 98 degrees farenheit! And classic texts
on ether are emphatic at its danger in handling, what with it in
gaseous form being five times heavier than air, and stale ether being
even more of a hazard.
Peter Ward
2007-06-17 11:40:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Walter Traprock
Post by r***@bestweb.net
For anesthetizing humans, sure, gases are still used plenty, and
ether's probably still the most popular of anesthetic gases. Short of
killing you from an OD or exploding, about its only side effect is a
sore throat.
Ether boils at something like 98 degrees farenheit! And classic texts
on ether are emphatic at its danger in handling, what with it in
gaseous form being five times heavier than air, and stale ether being
even more of a hazard.
Mmmmm, stale eth....zzzzzzzzzzzz
--
Peter

I'm an alien

email: groups at asylum dot nildram dot co dot uk
groo
2007-06-16 18:56:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by r***@bestweb.net
For anesthetizing humans, sure, gases are still used plenty, and
ether's probably still the most popular of anesthetic gases. Short of
killing you from an OD or exploding, about its only side effect is a
sore throat.
I have a brother-in-law who's an anesthetist. I'll ask him.
--
Eskimo Eskimo Eskimo Eskimo

"The best way to a man's heart is to saw his breast plate open."
Dhubghall
2007-06-19 15:57:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by r***@bestweb.net
For anesthetizing humans, sure, gases are still used plenty, and
ether's probably still the most popular of anesthetic gases. Short of
killing you from an OD or exploding, about its only side effect is a
sore throat.
Pure ether hasn't been used in many years. Most inhalation anesthetics
nowadays are halogenated ethers. Isoflurane and enflurane are to of the
more popular and neither are flammable. There is another one that is
pretty popular but is patented and thus more expensive but I can't
remember the name. At least this was the case 15 years ago when working
in an Anesthesia lab.


Dougall
x
2007-06-19 22:27:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dhubghall
Post by r***@bestweb.net
For anesthetizing humans, sure, gases are still used plenty, and
ether's probably still the most popular of anesthetic gases. Short of
killing you from an OD or exploding, about its only side effect is a
sore throat.
Pure ether hasn't been used in many years. Most inhalation anesthetics
nowadays are halogenated ethers. Isoflurane and enflurane are to of the
more popular and neither are flammable. There is another one that is
pretty popular but is patented and thus more expensive but I can't
remember the name. At least this was the case 15 years ago when working
in an Anesthesia lab.
Dougall
Desflurane? Sevoflurane is becoming popular in veterinary anesthesia.

Delurking to post at least two or three times a decade...
Mike
Les Albert
2007-06-19 22:30:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by x
Desflurane? Sevoflurane is becoming popular in veterinary anesthesia.
Delurking to post at least two or three times a decade...
Gab, gab, gab. Give it a rest.

Les
Snidely
2007-06-19 22:45:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Les Albert
Post by x
Delurking to post at least two or three times a decade...
Gab, gab, gab. Give it a rest.
Skews the stats, doesn't it?

/dps

Loading...